Lightroom CC is not Lightroom.

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  • Updated 1 year ago
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The new Lightroom CC is like trying to foist Photoshop Express on us in place of proper Photoshop. It's jamming a mobile app into a desktop environment. We've lost easily navigable tabs; the histogram is less prevalent and clear. Forget trying to manage a catalogue in this new app. This is not an app for professionals like the one most of us have come to trust.

For those of us with a huge amount of experience in Lightroom proper, this is massively concerning. The redesignation of Lightroom proper as "Classic" signals that it's on the way out (as has been the case for nearly every other software out there that's seen a subversion and redesignation). This move has lost Adobe a lot of my trust, and I'm really worried about having to figure out a new catalogue manager if support for Lightroom "Classic" is pulled out from under us.
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Jennifer Putman

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  • Concerned

Posted 1 year ago

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Jack Nilles

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Hear! Hear! Maybe Classic is part of a plan to shift us all to ON1. Classic surely seems unduly beset with bugs; it's at its alpha stage.
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John Campbell

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"You dont loose desktop version of Lightroom (now Classic) so what’s the problem? They have added an early version of a cloud based program, that you dont have to use at all."

The problem is Adobe is sending a clear signal that the professional desktop user is no longer their focus. Their new customer is the casual user who doesn't mind paying for the app subscription plus paying for cloud storage. A mobile/cloud strategy may work for them but professionals who generate lots of large files sometimes on a daily basis do not want to have to upload them to the cloud just to use Adobe's app. 

Both the new Photoshop and Lightroom versions are full of bugs and slower than their previous versions. It appears Adobe does not have the resources or the desire to develop or support apps for professionals while changing their focus to dumbed-down mobile versions.
The question is as a professional user do I continue to invest my time and money into a product that clearly will not support my needs in the future or do I jump ship and find a alternative? 
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Dave Pearce

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LR has always had bugs, and Adobe have always tried to fix them, what makes you think they wont continue this?
While Adobe might be sending out 'signal's, how does this effect those who have no need for the cloud based stuff?  Not speculation, but now and in the real world. We are all grown ups and surely can ignore or dont buy in to a service we dont want, and just continue working how we are used to.
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John Campbell

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Fair point but how long will you current workflow work? The concern is that Classic will no longer be updated as all Adobe's efforts will be focused on their mobile strategy. Which means that the "bugs" may not get fixed, new functionality will not be developed, new cameras will not be supported and the app in general not updated to keep up with updated operating systems. What happens when Adobe shuts down the Lightroom Classic subscription service?  Your only choice will be to move all your files to Adobe's cloud in order to work with the new Lightroom or migrate to something different.  

We don't know what Adobe's roadmap is for supporting professional users but anyone who used Apple's Aperture understands the just because a large company  seems to be dedicated to the pro user doesn't mean that they will not pull the plug on their customer base to pursue what they see as a more profitable market share.

Cloud strategies are sketchy at best. Many of us don't want to be tied into paying for storage fee just to use a companies app. Running files back and forth to the cloud may work for casual users but for professionals with huge image libraries it's impractical. 

To answer your question "... and just continue working how we are used to." may not be a option for very long.
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Dave Pearce

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Lots of speculation though. I do actually agree with a lot of it, but at the moment there is nothing to worry about.
If you used something before LR came along then you have already changed your workflow once, and seem to be ok at the moment, so who knows what small or large changes we will need to make in the future.
One thing i do know is as more features are added our workflows are already changing, all be it in small stages. Everything changes over time, sometimes we have to go with the flow because there is no option, sometimes its because we want to as we are offered something better.
When Adobe first went to CC a lot of people were up in arms, yet a few years down the line i bet most of those people are still using Adobe software. The choice to go elsewhere is always there, but if you want a certain product or service you stump up and pay for it. Prices and costs always go up, its how the world works. 
All IMO of course.

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anssik

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I've been waiting proper metadata management between LR Mobile and LR CC 2015. The solution behind the Adobe curtains? A new LR desktop app that has focus on consumers, not professionals. That's no good. Consumers do not need full-scale metadata sync as professionals.

So Adobe chose to not implement proper metadata syncing (keywords) between LR Classic CC and LR Mobile.

That's not a situation where professionals would NOT lose something because of the new LR CC focusing on consumers. Professionals have lost the priority in Adobe's plans and that is worrisome.
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scott moore

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I see what they're trying to do, but I don't like it. First, I don't want or need Adobe to host all my photos in the cloud. I watched a video yesterday that said you could buy 1TB of storage from Adobe for $10 a month, but then I searched and couldn't find any way to add storage for Adobe Lightrooom CC. 

But, even if I do add storage (which I won't), I don't want my entire Lightroom catalog on my phone and tablet, as it would eat up too much storage on my devices, and I'd have to purchase duplicate storage from Apple as my devices fill up with gigabytes of data. 

I think Lightoom CC is a bust, even if they port all the features over. They already have Lightoom Mobile for the iPad and iPhone, and when you create mobile collections in Lightroom "Classic" CC, they also appear on devices when you open Lightroom CC. 

I don't need it ALL in the cloud, and I don't want ALL of it in the cloud. Not until my iPad and iPhone have 4TB of flash. 
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Selondon

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I only have 70ish GB up there Scott and it takes up less than 1GB on my phone, plus the cache can be cleared to make that smaller. Depends how much you edit etc.
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catherine Lucas

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There is a lot of doom thinking going on... Applications change and we change along with them. It does not make sense for me that Adobe would stop the desktop version. Newspapers, magazines, Ad agencies all use PS... Why would Adobe kill their golden calf? Stop the whining already, try to evolve with the application. There is waaaayyy tooooo much money involved for Adobe to kill of their desktop version... 
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anssik

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Catherene, Adobe may very well have people doing business decisions focusing on volume (consumers) instead of professional needs. They've shown that us now as LR has become refocused to suit consumer workflows instead of professionals.

So yes, they are willing to do stupid decisions from professional point of view. Instead of streamlining LR workflows between desktop, mobile and web, they've introduced more complex system that has two desktop apps that are not equally in sync with mobile and web apps.

They've decided to compete agains Apple Photos and Google Photos, they will prioritise on consumer workflows instead of professionals.

That's it. Can't be more clear. They are willing to have a more complex system to gain more volume from consumers.
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scott moore

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I would have to agree with the majority sentiment in this thread after spending a couple of days really digging into LR CC. LR CC is not even a thing. It's not even an option. Should it become the only option, I'll have to find another program to manage my raw photos and do bulk editing. It's massively flawed. 
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Dave Pearce

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So was LR v.1 all those years ago.
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scott moore

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The difference is that it was a brand new product. This is not what we expect from a mature product. It’s massively flawed and poorly thought out.
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Butch_M

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Of course Lr v1 was not what we have today ... but it certainly was far from being 'massively flawed' ... 

The problem really isn't that Lightroom CC is a bad product ... though it indeed has a ling way to go to be viable for many advanced users ... the 'massive flaw' is Adobe's failure in properly communicating this new apps place in the lineup, how it can be beneficial to end users and detailing in a better way what if any impact it will have on Lightroom Classic.

Adobe dropped the ball in a big way. Plain and simple.
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Carlos Oliveras

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A survey on how current customers feel about switching from LR "Classic" to the all-new LR CC:

https://lightroomkillertips.com/lightroom-name-change-tip-lightroom-classiccc-survey-results/

Not necessarily to be taken as the universal truth, but definitely food for thought, isn't it?