Lightroom Classic: Calibration profiles missing

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I run LR CC Classic, and process photos from a Sony A7 camera.  All along, I have been able to go down to the bottom of the Develop panel, to the Calibration section, and select the various profiles available to the camera (Landscape, Vivid, etc).  Starting about a week ago (I think there was an update to the program, can't remember?), they are no longer there.  All I have are Process selections for Version 1, Version 2, Version 3, and Version 4.

Where did they go, and how can I get them back?
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Mark Fleming

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Posted 6 months ago

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Ellis Vener

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They are now at the top of the Basic panel
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Salty

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Thank you!!!!
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PJS

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Not only have they moved to the much better location but there are loads more AND for many you can adjust the opacity of the profile.
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Mark Fleming

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Thank you, I didn't see that! A better spot for it, for sure.

But I see that the options are Abode Landscape, Adobe Vivid, Adobe Color, etc.  I could swear it used to say Camera Landscape, Camera Vivid, Camera Color, etc.  Isn't this true?  And if so, did they just change the wording and it's the same thing? Or is it Adobe simulating the camera's profile?
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Johan Elzenga, Champion

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Click the icon with the four squares. That will give you a profile browser. You will see that there are many more profiles, including profiles that simulate camera settings.
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Victoria Bampton - Lightroom Queen, Champion

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Click the 4 squares to the right of the pop-up to see the full browser. You'll find your profiles in the Camera Matching folder and if you click the star in the corner, you can get them to show up in the pop-up.
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Mark Fleming

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Got it!  Thanks everyone for the quick answers.
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Doug Crist

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I see all of this, and although some look better than others, they are all still very dark.  Will I have to add in other settings to get them up where I think they need to be?  This is why I almost never shoot in RAW.  It takes forever to get the images to look anywhere near decent.
Thanks for any help,
Doug
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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If you are shooting using a special camera mode: a general AutoFix, or a Dynamic Range setting, or an sLog video profile, then the raw data may be dark even though what the camera produces in its own JPGs looks ok. 

It isn't that LR is doing something wrong, or the LR profiles are bad, it is that you have your camera set to produce underexposed raws and the camera is changing them to look ok in its own JPGs.

If you intend to use software that isn't from your camera manufacturer, i.e. LR, then set your camera to take more appropriately exposed photos.  LR won't know about your camera's auto-fix, or DR, or sLog adjustments as it deals with the raw data and allows YOU to adjust things from there.

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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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And if you are not using any special camera modes, then perhaps the display on your computer is set too dark, and you can run through the OS calibration procedure.

It would be interesting to see an example of a raw that you see as too dark, if you could upload one to somewhere like dropbox or googledrive or onedrive and post a public download link, here.

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James Hess

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Perhaps it's time for you to consider customizing your raw defaults as well as your shooting habits when shooting raw images.
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Doug Crist

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That sounds like good advice.  By 'customizing raw defaults' do you mean just setting up a user preset and just apply that on import for raw images?  Or is there more to it than that?
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James Hess

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If the raw images are consistently underexposed, I would consider adjusting a newly imported raw image that represents one of your "typical" images so that it looks the way you would want it to appear when it is first imported. That would include adjusting the exposure among other settings. Don't worry about things that might be specific to that particular image. Then I would save new camera defaults. From that point forward, those defaults will be applied whenever raw images are imported or whenever you click on the reset button. That's one way to do it. Another way would be to create a user preset that could be applied. Personally, I prefer to customize the camera defaults.