Lightroom CC / 6 Photo Merge Settings not transferring in HDR and Panorama Merges

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Tried the panorama feature in LR6 to find out that it doesn't import all the settings for the raw file, tried a pano with a landscape, it discarded the gradients that were over the sky area. Also applying a gradient on the resulting DNG turned the sky grey and using the hue and color sliders only afected the exposure of the gradient, not the color. Had the previous pano version done in photoshop to compare. Any ideas?
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Alex Busuioceanu

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Posted 4 years ago

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Rikk Flohr, Official Rep

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Official Response
Today, this is how Panorama and HDR settings transfers work. As always, this behavior is subject to change:

Please note that the settings that are copied over will differ between the HDR and Panorama cases.

For a Panorama, the merge tool is changing geometric attributes, and will therefore not copy over existing geometric settings such as Lens Corrections/Upright (with the exception of Defringe settings).

For HDR, the merge tool is expanding tonal range, so existing primary tone settings (such as Exposure, Contrast, Highlights, Shadows, Whites, and Blacks) are not copied over.

Settings cleared for both the HDR & Pano cases:
- Local Corrections
- Red Eye
- Spot Healing
- Upright
- Crop

Settings that are copied over (with some exceptions):
- Basic Panel (except primary tone adjustments for HDR)
- Tone Curves (HDR no, Pano yes)
- HSL/Color/B&W
- Split Toning
- Detail Panel
- Lens Correction (HDR yes, Pano only Defringe)
- Effects Panel
- Camera Calibration (except Process Version, which must always be current for HDR)

I hope this helps.
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Rikk Flohr, Official Rep

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Update: As of CC2015.5/6.5, Spot Healing is now retained for Panoramas. 
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Alex Busuioceanu

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Then it remains a tool for amateur photographers. It should take into consideration adjustments like gradient filters. I can understand why you would dismiss local adjustments like brushes, but not gradients.

Of course some people will say use photoshop to get desired result but that beats the point of having panos in LR

Also why is the resulting dng file impacted so badly by local adjustments? The psd obtained by photoshop handles the adjustments better (gray cast on the gradient with no posibility to add tint or hue)
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Eric Chan, Camera Raw Engineer

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Official Response
Local corrections applied to one of the source images doesn't make sense once the image has been stitched into a pano. The geometry of the two images is completely different. If you like, you can sync local adjustments from one of your sources to the final merged result, but most likely the results won't look good.

The intended and recommended workflow is to merge images first, then edit the result (not the other way around).
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Evan Robinson

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Lightroom clearly knows how the geometry of each individual image is mapped into the panorama. And therefore knows exactly how each local correction should be mapped into the panorama. As for whether or not local corrections make sense in the panorama, that's a decision that the photographer should make, not the software. It's FAR faster to make corrections in individual images than in a giant panorama, and Lightroom is not very reliable in accurately showing local corrections in a panorama at 28K x 6K, with very slow redraw speeds and incorrect redraw in many cases.

If the user has made the decision to modify individual images and then combine them into a panorama, Lightroom should respect those changes. At the very worst, Lightroom could request guidance with a dialog (or checkbox) indicating the ability to include or not include corrections made on input images.
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Alex Busuioceanu

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Then how come it works so good exported out of lightroom and stiched in photoshop? You should leave it to the photographer to choose wether he applies a gradient or not, and then syncs all the source materials. It has nothing to do with the geometry of the photo. The gradient is applied at the same level in all the images.
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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One difference between PS and this new LR/ACR panorama process is that the images are stitched starting as raw files resulting in a raw-ish file--presumably a linear-DNG--because various camera profiles and absolute white-balance can be changed.
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What I believe is the disconnect in this discussion is that Alex imagines each individual image's settings (like a gradient applied to dim the sky or shift its color) applied to each individual image prior to stitching and then those resulting images with all there settings already applied are stitched into a panorama, just how PS works because it isn't concerned with the result being raw data.

What Eric and Rikk are talking about are the settings of each image ignored (almost) entirely during the stitching but then the settings from the FIRST IMAGE being applied to resulting raw file, but only settings that aren't dependent on aspect ratio or that aren't specific to a local area of a particular image, because there is no way to translate a position or line on the first image to the corresponding position or line on the resulting panorama.
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Experiment with a few image panorama and it'll make sense:

Apply an Effects panel Vignette with an amount maxed out to white and a feather of zero to all the images and then see what LR does with that, then try changing the vignette OF ONLY THE FIRST IMAGE to the minimal Amount value so the vignette is black on the first image and white on all the others and create another panorama.

Then do the same thing with Exposure--apply a +4 EV adjustment to the first image and a -4 EV adjustment to the remaining images and see what the resulting panorama looks like.
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As far as having a choice, if you subscribe to CC then you can choose to stitch in PS where all settings are applied prior to stitching or use stitch in LR with the first image's settings applied at the end.

And even if you only have LR and not PS, you still have a choice by producing TIFs with the adjustments baked in and stitching those with LR--which would be more like PS's method.
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Evan Robinson

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Your final option is a workaround, which does work (it's what I did). But that is putting the work on the user, not the software. the purpose of the software is to do work for the user, not the other way around.
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Alan Evans

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It is interesting that the Merge to panorama ignores the lens profile. I have done a couple of these now, and in all cases using a lens for which I do not have a profile, a Sigma 20-40mm f/2.8 EX DG, and I receive an error message "!Unable to match a lens profile automatically. For best results apply the appropriate lens profile to the photos before merging." That seems to imply that the lens correction profile is applied to the image before merging, which is the only way I could imagine a lens profile being used. As I usually use this lens at a normal focal length on a Canon crop camera for pano's lack of a profile is not a huge issue.

I have to say that of the panoramas that I have stitched using this function, including a 63 image multi row handheld one in a museum, the results have been much better than what I got from using PSCS5, which needed a lot of manual work to bring them up to the level achieved by this new LR feature. On the very large image, where I usually had a little more than 50% overlap in both directions. I also had a lot of people moving about, it seems to automatically try to reduce the number of moving items within the final image.

I don't do many panoramas, but this is likely to encourage me do do more, it seems so simple, and easy to get a good result. I am certainly unlikely to try it in PSCC now.

Alan
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DigitalOxygen.ca

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This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Lightroom CC Ignores Spot Removal Adjustments During Pano Generation.

I have some photos in which I have used the spot removal brush. When I use these photos in a pano (Brenizer method) the spot removal is ignored and the items I cloned out are visible in the pano preview.
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Evan Robinson

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This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Lightroom Panorama ignores heal brush edits in source images.

Using Adobe Lightroom CC 2015.3 with Camera Raw 9.3 on a late 2013 iMac 27" with 32 GB RAM and GeForce GTX 780M 4096MB Graphics card, I am building a panorama using 9 vertical NEF files from a Nikon D810 (about 7Kx5K). Each of the NEFs has been edited in Lightroom using the heal brush. The resulting panorama does not include at least some of the heal edits (possibly all).
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Martin Feda

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This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Lightroom CC 2015.6.1: Protocol is incomplete for HDR and pano creation.

When creating a HDR or pano in Lightroom CC 15.6.1, the protocol shows just one entry for the import, which is not selected. You will loose some settings such as lens corrections settings when selecting it (as I already did several times, as I sometimes want to go back to the start).In previous releases, there always was some second entry "multiple settings" in the protocol for HDRs and panos (I do not know how exactly this step was named in the English version, in German it was called "Mehrere Einstellungen"). Why is this entry now missing in the protocol, which represented the original status after HDR/pano creation?
I already spent a lot of time for correcting HDRs and panos, after I realized that the original settings were gone!
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Jones Arcadian

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