Lightroom and ACR: Larger setting for Recovery and Exposure.

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Recovery and Exposure is always not enough. Sometimes, when you increase exposure to more than 3 EV, recovery couldn't handle it. For exposure, it would benefit the people shooting ISOless (base ISO) if there was higher EV for them to increase. I also notice that when you increase exposure a lot, there will be tints at the shadows, it would be better if it could be fixed.
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Jinn Leong

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Posted 7 years ago

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Rob Cole

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I've never needed a larger range than is offered.

Are you sure you are exhausting other possibilities for brightening, like:

- fill-light
- brightness
- tone curve.

In other words, I almost *never* increase exposure to brighten picture, then use recovery to pull down the over-bright highs. In fact, often just the opposite - I tend to set exposure based on where I want the highs, then use the above-mentioned to bring up the lows and mids, using recovery sparingly if at all.

PS - I solve shadow-tints using split toner.

If you must get more range, there are two things you can do:
- Use DNG Profile Editor to create a "brightening/high-exposure" profile.
- Use local exposure adjustment.
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Jinn Leong

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Fill light, brightness and tone curve often increase more noise compared to exposure to me. And for people shooting ISOless, Lightroom is seriously not suitable for it, yet, hopefully.
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Jinn Leong

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Yes, but I don't think many manufacturers are going to change for this ISOless sensor. Not many people know about this and camera manufacturers aren't going to take the risk to remove the ISO parameter, many traditional photographer will be confused.
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LRuserXY

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First, thanks for pointing to the ISOless shooting, that was totally new to me, very interesting (although not convinced yet, just like Rob Cole).

If this should really find its way into Lightroom, I would propose NOT to increase the exposure range, but instead introduce a NEW setting "virtual ISO" to virtually change the cameras ISO setting afterwards as it was intendet when shooting the picture (just like LR implicitely corrects canons CR2 with highlight tone priority, albeit only 1 f-stop). The exposure slider would keep its current range and still be used only for correction of the overall appearance of the photo.

Not sure about the recovery though... It seems to me that for such extreme highlight recoveries (not 1 or 2 f-stops, but 5 or even more f-stops) the current recovery feature may not be suitable. One will need "real" tonemapping algorithms in LR. Or am I wrong here?
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Rob Cole

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|> "It seems to me that for such extreme highlight recoveries (not 1 or 2 f-stops, but 5 or even more f-stops) the current recovery feature may not be suitable".

I think you're right about that part - dunno 'bout the rest ;-}
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Jinn Leong

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I'm not shooting ISOless yet, because I don't want to lose the good old JPEG preview, until it is fixed, I ain't shooting ISOless. But quite some people is already starting to shoot ISOless, so it would definitely benefit them.
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Jinn Leong

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For every exposure you increase, you need to increase 33 recovery. After 33, the results start to become less useful. After 66, it's almost unusable, the colors almost disappear.
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Jinn Leong

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Also, increasing exposure is more predictable and linear, to me again.
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Dorin Nicolaescu-Musteață, Champion

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For the record, in Lightroom 4.1 and older Exposure can be turned to eleven (or 10 EV, to be precise).
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Rob Cole

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If that ain't enough, I can't help but think the photos are extremely underexposed. But then, I don't really get this ISO-Lossless stuff. In the past, people boosted ISO when shooting to avoid having to boost exposure too much in post (and have better quality). Has this changed yet I missed the memo?