Photoshop: JPEG format different between Photoshop CS2 and CS6 (JFIF vs. EXIF standards)

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When I use Photoshop CS6 to save a jpeg file which I then upload to a person's page in the genealogy program GeneWeb, I get the error: "incorrect image content type: image/jpeg". Photoshop CS2 doesn't give this error. Something has changed in the jpeg format between CS2 and CS6. Has anyone else had such a problem, or know of a fix?
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Donald Gudehus

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  • confused

Posted 6 years ago

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Paul Riggott

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Donald Gudehus

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It looks like my version of GeneWeb, 4.09, can't handle the newer jpeg version. My workarounds are 1) use Photoshop PS2, or 2) use the png format which GeneWeb does accept. I can't use a later version of GeneWeb because the version of Linux on the web server doesn't support it. I didn't see any option in Photoshop PS6 to save in the old jpeg format. Too bad. Thanks for your help!
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Chris Cox

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Yes, that sounds like your GeneWeb program is seriously out of date, or has a bug in parsing JPEG files.
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Stephan Yankov

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This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Photoshop: Where have all JFIF headers gone?.

Versions of PhotoShop after 5.0 don't write a JFIF header, only EXIF header. This creates a huge problem for older applications by not letting them know the image resolution, which they assume to be 72dpi and this creates a lot of problems for placing or printing. Would it be that much trouble to have BOTH headers in a JPEG file, so that both old and new applications feel good with PhotoShop produced JPEG files!?
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Stephan Yankov

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Okay, somebody merged my question to Adobe developers here, in a topic which glorifies the new EXIF standard and calls the old JFIF header obsolete.

To Adobe it may be obsolete, but to hundreds or maybe thousands of older applications it's the only one they will ever be able to handle. So my REAL question was: is it such a big problem to write BOTH headers in every JPEG file? Or create an option for those who want to choose which one they want?

Obviously PhotoShop handles equally well EXIF and JFIF headers when opening JPEG files - so it shouldn't be a problem for it to also write them both - or the one we prefer (need)... After all, it did write JFIF correctly until CS4, and from CS5 it just lost that functionality, which makes it a nightmare to import JPEGS in CorelDraw, in ZBE Chromira's print manager, in many programs described by others in the topic above, and in many, many others...
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Chris Cox

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That's because EXIF is the current standard and JFIF has been deprecated for many years now. EXIF replaced JFIF many years ago.

No, we cannot write both headers and be EXIF compliant.
If we write JFIF headers, then many modern applications and devices would not read the files correctly, because they are expecting the EXIF standard. Adobe delayed as long as we could, but the complaints about not being EXIF compliant built up.

Applications that don't support EXIF are probably over 10 years old at this point.
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Stephan Yankov

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Well, in this case I see 2 options:

1. You give us the choice which header to write in our files by selecting this in PhotoShop settings

or

2. You create a small utility, called EXIF2JFIF, in whose window we just drag and drop a list of JPEG files we want to have JFIF headers, and it simply changes the header from EXIF to JFIF without touching the image part of the file.

Our only option now is to batch process the CS5+ saved files with a CS3 or CS4, thus helping our older applications to read the size and resolution information correctly. But this also recompresses the files and they lose some quality, so it's not a good solution.

Obviously trashing our $100,000+ Chromira printer is not an option, neither we can request a change in there 10+ year-old software, among many others.

I'm sure it won't be that much trouble for you and in the end we will have one reason less to keep some of your old version software...
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Chris Cox

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BTW - the first comment in Apple's stack exchange is incorrect because you cannot write a JFIF file that is EXIF compatible -- most EXIF compatible readers will choke on it (which is why we got so many complaints about Photoshop continuing to write JFIF).

Yes, actually it would be a lot of trouble to try to support and test 2 different, incompatible standards.

Yes, it is possible to write a utility to strip the EXIF metadata, but then any resolution, color profile or other metadata would also be stripped.

So, you can strip all the metadata, or get the printer software updated to work with current standards. Chromira's maker, ZBE, appears to still be in business and updating their printers.