Lightroom: Is there a way to get information about the bit depth of Tiff files (8 or 16 bits) and color space ?

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Is there a way to get information about the bit depth of Tiff files (8 or 16 bits) and color space ?
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Philippe Bachelier

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Posted 4 years ago

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Rob Cole

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Natively (without a plugin) you mean?

* bit-depth: no
* color-space: sortof (you can make a smart collection which uses text matching to isolate various color-spaces, but you have to know what the range of possibilities are..).

You need a plugin to support both items.
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Philippe Bachelier

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Yes without any kind of plugin ;-)
I know one can use a plugin, but :
iview media pro used to give this information, as well as now it's Phaseone version which is Media Pro.
In Photoshop, one can read at least this information at the bottom of a file :
File size
Document size
Profile and Bit Depth
Why not including it in LR ?
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Rob Cole

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If you knew it was possible with a plugin (or you were only interested in solutions which do not require plugins), that would've been worth mentioning up front, in my opinion.
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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> Why not include it in LR?

In Photoshop you're seeing the current bit-depth and color profile of the internal workspace, both of which can be changed via PS menus, so that information is not what the file you read in, was, necessarily, just what you have set in PS.

In LR there is no way to change the bit-depth and colorspace of LR's internal workspace, so there's no need to show what it is, since it's always the same.
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Philippe Bachelier

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When one creates a catalogue, with such details of metadata already available in LR, it would be a good thing to know the specifications of a file, such as color space and bit depth.

And let's say you import a Tiff or Jpeg file, which might embed any kind of ICC profile. If its profile is sRGB, it would be useless to export it or edit it in Photoshop with a larger color space like Adobe RGB or even ProPhoto. Knowing the source space, one might get a better handling of files, as far as color space is concerned.
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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If you've made ANY adjustments to color or toning then you have changed what colorspace might be able to contain the adjusted tones and colors, so it's not unreasonable to always use 16-bit ProPhotoRGB when taking the photo outside of LR to another product for further adjustments.

If you never make any adjustments to your photos in LR then it's probably not necessary to use LR for anything and you can just use whatever file browser your preferred editor has.
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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I can see why it might be interesting to know what your input photos colorspace and bit-depth are so you can choose to do things differently when you produce them, but it doesn't make any difference to how things work in LR once you've started making adjustments.
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Rob Cole

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Philippe,

It is useful to edit in a larger colorspace and bit-depth than source, even if you will be repackaging in the smaller colorspace/bit-depth again upon export.

So, as Steve said, there are really no editing decisions which should be made differently based on source bit-depth and color-space.

Don't get me wrong: I'm all for being able to know, since it could be useful to "find all tifs that are 8-bit" for example, for reasons that you shouldn't have to justify (maybe it just happens to be one of the things you know about a file you are trying to find..).

So, now you know why it's not supported natively in Lightroom. +1 vote for native support (all available metadata, including bit-depth, color-space, ... ), even if not critical for editing decisions..

Cheers,
Rob