Is Adobe interested in hearing from long-time customers who don't wish to subscribe to CC

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I feel like Adobe is not interested in the views of long-time customers who don't want to subscribe to CC. I'm retired and on a fixed income which means I don't have the means to buy the latest cameras, lenses or computers. I make do with what I have for as long as I am able.

I live in Canada which means the CC subscription cost per month is almost 30% higher than what US customers pay. Internet speeds in Canada are not as fast or affordable as they are in the USA. I'm not comfortable with storing my images on one of Adobe's cloud servers. Not only do I worry about being able to access my images when I want but I also have privacy concerns. My son uses CC for photoshop and LR. He was working on a graphics design project inside Photoshop. One morning access to Photoshop was gone - Adobe determined his computer wasn't up to their specs and so pulled his access privileges. Forgive me but I'm not interested in some algorithm deciding whether my computer is fast enough to run a program I'm paying for.

I have been using LR since LR3, I'm currently running LR5. I taught my 70+ year old mother how to use a DSLR and how to edit RAW images in LR. Her pension income is smaller than mine. I simply don't buy Adobe's explanation for ending perpetual licenses. We all know that as a corporation maximizing profit is the prime directive. Forcing people onto CC appears to have been a success due in no small part to Adobe's strategy of making perpetual licenses near impossible to find and buy and even then complicating the download process such that a customer ends up paying twice then faces a delay while sales gets an approval to refund the duplicate transaction. This happened to me when I bought LR5 for my mother and when I bought my own update.

I think Adobe is missing the benefit of treating long-time customers with respect and at least trying to meet their needs. I encourage and sometimes mentor younger photographers, and some who not so young. So far I have pointed them towards Adobe photography products. But now with LR7 unexpectedly not available as a perpetual licenses - country to what was implied in the past - I'm forced to begin looking for alternatives to LR. Not surprisingly their recent announcement resulted in fresh emails about new products from ON1Raw, Macphun's Luminosity, and a couple others. I'm giving them serious consideration which is sad because I really like what I'm able to do inside LR instead of relying on intelligent filters etc. 

Somewhere on Adobe's web site I saw something about commitments to excellence, innovation and openness. I think you've forgotten integrity, customer service and frankly openness. It's interesting that LR perpetual license isn't even on the list below.
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Ken Udle

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  • ignored and let down.

Posted 7 months ago

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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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"I'm not comfortable with storing my images on one of Adobe's cloud servers."

Storing images in Lightroom mobile is purely optional with Lightroom Classic CC.

"My son uses CC for photoshop and LR. He was working on a graphics design project inside Photoshop. One morning access to Photoshop was gone - Adobe determined his computer wasn't up to their specs and so pulled his access privileges."

I'm not following this one. If a version of Photoshop works on supported OS https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/system-requirements.html , there's nothing we do to pull access. If he tries to update to a new version of Photoshop and he has an ancient operating system, the installer may tell him that his computer doesn't support the latest version of Photoshop.
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Carl Douthit

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Ken, I'm giving up on Adobe also.

I have pre-ordered the new Luminar 2018 for Windows and will give it a try. If that isn't as good of a fit as I think it will be, my second move will be ACDSee 2018. The price of those two combined will only be $10 more than for the old Photography plan.

And by the way, the new subscription names are just as confusing as the new names for Lightroom CC Classic/Lightroom CC (or whatever). 

So my next step is visiting my Adobe Account page and trying to cancel the automatic renewal action (or just delete/change my credit card info to make it impossible to be charged if I can't trust that Adobe will not charge me anyway).

To those who will say that if I'm leaving then Lightroom/Photoshop was not the program for me. Perhaps it is a yes, but it could have been if Adobe Support was what it should be.

More accurately, the Adobe customer interaction (including no-help Support) is not for me. If Adobe doesn't want anything to do with me (i.e., Support), then I don't want anything to do with them and will no longer give them my money.
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Ken Udle

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Luminar 2018 is at the top of my alternatives list. I had not heard of ACDSee but will look into it.  Also, if you leave then LR was not the program for you, I think that's an unfair statement, from my perspective LR itself is a fine program, I've used it for years. Adobe changed its delivery of the program such that you and I will no longer receive updates, even ones to keep current with OS upgrades. No, Adobe is not the company for us, that's the more accurate statement.
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Hi Carl, it doesn't look like you've ever contacted support. All Creative Cloud memberships include phone and chat support: https://helpx.adobe.com/contact.html
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Carl Douthit

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Just how many layers was I supposed to click through before finally finding an option to contact a real person? I didn't bother to count just now, but it is quite a few and the information/links are not made very available at all. And clicking on "Help" in Ps takes me to a webpage that has entries that include users posting questions and getting "answers" from others in the forum that might or might not be trustworthy or correct.

I guess I gave up during the times I started to try to find help and just went to the forum since it is clearly the primary option offered to customers by Adobe. I suppose that is a cheaper option for Adobe.

I guess I also believed the people in the forum (again, the primary option offered at every level) when they said that there was no way to email Adobe support and get an answer. There are some things that are difficult to explain over the phone and difficult to follow the response, making email support a much easier option for me.

When I compare the non-forum support options from Adobe with similar options from competitors, there is no comparison at all. Several other competitors offer much more user-friendly support options -- especially for people who have difficulty with phone conversations and for whom chat is not a practical experience.

So no, there probably isn't a record of me successfully contacting Support. But that doesn't mean that I didn't try and it doesn't mean that I didn't need support -- not at all.
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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I'm sorry you found it frustrating. We present self-help options first because that's usually the most efficient way to solve a problem. Most inquiries/issues can be solved with any number of help documents we provide. There are also different departments, so the questions that are asked are to better route your inquiry. The forums are staffed by 5 full time support employees, and dozens of engineers and product managers from the product development team who also help out with answering questions and addressing issues. I addition to employees there are several Adobe Community Professionals, who are training and advanced users of our products that help answer questions. If you require direct help, phone and chat are available to paid members. Once contact is made, follow up interactions can be done through email.
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avpman

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Well put. I have no interest in Adobe holding my images hostage once I decide, or need to stop paying a monthly fee. I'll make due with an earlier version of a perpetually licensed version of a program. Someone, soon, will come along and snatch Adobe's LR customer base. Maybe then Adobe will listen - maybe too late.
(Edited)
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Your images are never held hostage. At the end of a membership, the Lightroom Classic will continue to launch and provide access to the photographs managed within Lightroom, including the ability to export or print the original or developed images, as well as access to the Slideshow, Web, Book or Print creations that we know many photographers painstakingly create. Only the Develop and Map modules are disabled after your membership ends. http://blogs.adobe.com/lightroomjournal/2014/07/what-happens-to-lightroom-after-my-membership-ends.html 
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avpman

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Sure - and I can bank on that just like Adobe claimed LR would forever be available as a stand alone product. I'm sorry Jeffery, many of us have no confidence in Adobe's truthfulness.