Invention of new software based on Photoshop if any image of colour retouching is uploaded on that it will show all the tool used in that

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There should be a software which will be based upon the Adobe Photoshop . In which there should be an image uploader in that software and when any colour Retouching photo uploaded on that It shows about the complete tool used in that photo and at how much value these are used for that photo or a complete graph of that photo should be displayed.
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Rahul kumar

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Posted 4 months ago

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Victoria Bampton - Lightroom Queen, Champion

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Who do you imagine would benefit from this tool? How would it help your workflow?
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Rahul kumar

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Yes of course it will be beneficial . you can develop it as an paid software and it will improve the learning skill ver easily with the help of graph which will be showed by that software that at how much value that tools are used
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Steve Lehman

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That's my question.  Why?   
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Rahul kumar

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It will be helpful for us for learning something new because editor don't have will to share such things
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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Looks like a request for something similar to Lightroom's Develop History, which is already available. 

https://digital-photography-school.com/3-lightroom-history-tips/

The PS History panel also provides information on edits applied, but not the actual values. It's also lost when the file is closed.

https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/undo-history.html
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lhiapgpeonk

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I think what he is basically trying to achieve is the following: Feed the ominous program an image (or screenshot, a jpg or whatever (except a layered tif)) which then calculates what tools in are necessary in Photoshop and in which order. This could maybe slightly work if you have the original unprocessed file, but otherwise I would say, nope, that's simply not possible. There would be a lot of guesswork involved...
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Jerry Syder

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I think I understand your request Rahul: A program where you can drag a photo into and see what settings were applied to get to the end result but as Todd alluded to, that each photo would be different so even if you were to see exactly what someone did to a photo, it would not really be beneficial as those settings would be different for other photos. At the end of the day, photography isn't mathematical, where you can apply principles to any image to get the same look. As well, photographers may use several plugins or software to come to an end result so it would be difficult for one software to collate all of that information. It's not a 1+1=2 scenario by no means. As Victoria mentioned, ask the photographer how they came about their edit and maybe they will share the details. 
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Rahul kumar

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Yes something like that
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Rahul kumar

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I need some time to put my thoughts and after that I will give you a valuable suggestions
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christoph pfaffenbichler, Champion

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This could maybe slightly work if you have the original unprocessed file, but otherwise I would say, nope, that's simply not possible. 
Indeed. 
Considering that producing a resulting retouched image may have involved thousands of overlapping brush/clone stamp/healing brush/...-strokes and dabs (on Layers and Layer Masks) the OP’s request seems impossible in principle in at least part of the cases.

And, along the lines of Victoria Bampton’s argument, I wonder how the OP would feel about anybody being able to reconstruct the exact processes involved in whatever they have and will produce (in whichever field, not just image editing). 
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Steve Lehman

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Hi there Rahul,  

I'm back again. and I see what you're trying to do.   I agree that most developments are personal, and should not be made public to others as companies want to preserve their own techniques.  

But, I have a few tips:  what I do on a personal level may help you.   I save each movement into a file of its own and I name the file what I did to it, and I keep all those files in one folder per each photo edited.   That way I keep a record of what I did, and then I can go back to any file to make changes needed and to finished it differently if needed, as a customer can make a request.   

This reminds me of the time when I was at Microsoft and on-loan to another company to help test their software.  We were being supervised as the company didn't want any of us to walk away with their source code and to copy their software.  So we were under a strict agreement if you can imagine.   We simply didn't share their source code and it was easy to see.  

You will be sharing highly classified information of your own which you wouldn't share with another.  Likewise, it wouldn't benefit another's edit since two edits are never the same.   You will find this to be true if you have edited hundreds like myself, and I have done a lot for my customers and I have supervised other technical editors who work for me.  Yet none of them have ever done their edits in the same way as another.   Even if we thought we could duplicate the routine, it always is different.  And that's why I love this business, because each day is totally different for me.   

For yourself, you might save lots of frustration over this as you will see in the future.  You will see how it will actually wreck your business sharing your work with others.  

In this forum, I don't mind sharing what I know about Photoshop because I have been using it since 1996 and for a long time I have found routines but they are merely how to begin and the finish is never the same.  I don't think a history of edits will be accepted well, especially by different companies.  But if you want to use that for yourself, Light Room has that.   I use Photoshop, and Elements and Light Room in a combination of uses.   Also, I have lots of versions of Elements so I can multi-task my photos, one photo per software program.   It's most beneficial to me to do this in this way.  

I help my customers to begin on Photoshop Elements although the majority get stuck right away with the clone tool and they never go further than the beginner's mode.  I keep pushing them into Expert Mode to load all of the tools at once, but they are reluctant.  Think of those who would be totally intimidated by your own editing history and how it wouldn't benefit a beginner.   Likewise, an expert will always tell you what they do best and they would argue with their own methods, and it's always going to be different than your own.  But I don't mind teaching the tools in the program and this forum is for those who want to get more out of it, who don't understand it as well as the rest of us.   

Back at Microsoft, I had a test lab and all of our labs were different.  As we would visit each other's, we got tips on how to setup a lab but they never worked into our own because we were stuck in our own ways.   This is why I don't think a Photoshop history would benefit another.   They are hard to duplicate.   They are personal.   They are like a patented idea.   They are secret to some.   Keep your secrets.   And to coin an old Microsoft slogan, "keep current".   

Happy computing,   
Steve Lehman, MCSE   
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Jaroslav Bereza

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You can automaticaly add your very detailed log about most of PS actions into PSD file metadata. Then you can read and parse these metadata.

http://sklad.bereza.cz/00-jarda/00_screenshot/2017-10-16_223335.jpg
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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Thank you this appears to be exactly what Rahul kumar is requesting. Whether or not someone wants that information available in the file metadata or a separate text sidecar file is entirely up to the user. I can see where it would be useful for multiple purposes.
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Cristen Gillespie

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> You can automaticaly add your very detailed log about most of PS actions into PSD file metadata. Then you can read and parse these metadata.>

Well, yes, and I do keep a detailed Edit History Log, but not everything that gets saved will make ANY sense to the non-programmer user, plus 3rd party filters rarely provide the information someone trying to learn from it is looking for. It might make sense to the filter's creator, but not much to us mere mortals.

I happen to agree that software that was even remotely accurate in "guessing" what a user did and revealing it to the world would be an invasion of the creator's privacy —think also of what could happen to people who are commissioned for work, then "outed" by this software to the purchasers/clients who think the software knows what it takes to both come up with and execute an idea. The software couldn't guess accurately, but a lot of people might decide the worth of a product based on it.

There are enough good tutorials out there, some even free, teaching us how to accomplish different tasks, that we can take notes, and even include notes in our own documents, along with the detailed Edit History log, in order to learn all the concepts without invading anyone's creative rights. Layered PSD files are even offered up for "reverse engineering" by authors and video instructors. Nothing more ought to be required of the creator.

Just as painters don't own their public free painting instruction, we who create digital art don't owe the public free instruction or our working process. Nor how long it took us to perform each step, or how many other steps we tried before arriving at a solution, or. . .
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Steve Lehman

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I really don't think anybody would do that.  Any metadata, wether for photos, website or any project is usually a secret to a company.   And, personally I wouldn't download nor read nor use another's metadata which could carry a virus or two.      
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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ANY file can contain a virus regardless of whether or not it contains History metadata. That's why we use antivirus software, correct? You also have the option to save the History data in a text sidecar file and keep it for your own use or training purposes. As long as  the .txt file is opened with a text editor there's no way a virus can be transferred to your system.

http://ezbackgrounds.com/blog/photoshop-history-log.php

https://creativepro.com/photoshop-history-log/
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Steve Lehman

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A metadata script or style script can contain the title of an image and then lead a user to a virus in an image or contain the image itself (and subsequent virus) in its description.  It would have to contain ASCII text otherwise it can contain an image file and virus.  As a vector text, I am not sure if this would be accepted by typical users.   
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Steve Lehman

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I like Cristen's comments.  

There are plenty of books, videos, "how to" for almost everything.  And then, most of us who help in this forum could write our own books too.  Almost all of us began with a book or two and then branched out to learn it on our own.  Most users of Elements want to learn at their own pace.  

I had a student in July, who had reluctantly stayed in the beginner area of PSE14, and when I encouraged her to advance to Expert Mode, she looked at it as if she was seeing a foreign language, then went back to Beginner Mode only because she wanted a hobby not a career. She wanted to learn it on her own.  Asking her to read a book or see a video was out of the question.  She would rather spend her days gazing at the screen.  If take the romance out of their hobby by forcing them to advance to bigger and better, they will never to return to it.  It's a huge hobby market.   If we force it onto them, that market will go flat.   I say stay with what's on the market for videos and books.  If you don't like the books that are out there, write your own and get what's not in other books into instruction.   That's your valuable metadata.