Photoshop: Interior HDR photography where outside light comes out pink?

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So I am trying to take interior photo's of my friends home for him and I'm having trouble when I'm facing the windows. I have bracketed (3 photo's.. 1 correct, 1 under, and 1 over exposed). From there I selected the 3 and under "photo" I chose "edit in" and then "merge to HDR Pro in Photoshop". That part was fine, except now (in the merged photo) everything looks fine except all the light in the window. It's a pink colour and I don't know how to fix it, or what I could have done to prevent it. I don't have external flashes or photomatix.

PLEAAAAASE HELP

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jordan Hunt

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Posted 3 years ago

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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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Can you provide the original 3 photos for others to test with? Upload them to www.dropbox.com and post a public share link to them, here.

If these are raw photos from a Canon 70D camera, then there is a bug in the ACR plug-in that causes almost blown highlights to be pink when they are dimmed down. Adobe is aware of this and I'd expect them to fix it in an upcoming ACR/LR release.

I ask for the files in case it is something else, completely.
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Chris Cox

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My guess is that the problem is due to different white balance in the interior and exterior. That usually needs to be corrected with a localized adjustment in the HDR image (before you apply toning down to an LDR image).

But yes, it is also possibly an issue with highlight recovery (though MergeToHDR tries to avoid that).
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jordan Hunt

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https://www.dropbox.com/sh/0kmkd80zas...

This is the link in response to Steve Sprengel's Request.

I was in fact using my 70D, by the sounds of it theres not much that can be done. Are there any suggestions as far as editing goes to fix it?

Also, somehow the original pics are missing so I sent bracketed pics plus the combined one of a similar picture.

Thanks for helping
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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The pink is the 70D highlight issue. It's hard to test with only JPGs, and not the original raws.
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jordan Hunt

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Sorry about that, I didn't even think about the RAW vs JPG.

Here is the link to the RAW photos, but by the sounds of what your saying, doesn't seem like theres much that can be done.

Thanks again.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/ntd6f36o4j...
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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I wanted to make sure there wasn't something else happening and now that I see the raws the pink is definitely the camera profile problem.

While you're waiting for Adobe to fix this, you can use Canon software to create 16-bit ProPhotoRGB TIFs and merge those.
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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This should be fixed now, with ACR 8.8 and the DNG Converter 8.8 released, today; however, I don't think they're making a new LR 5.8--it would just delay LR 6 more, so to have things work ok in LR you need to create new DNGs, as the old DNGs have the wrong white-point stored in them which is what PS is using when it makes the HDR.

It might be enough to install ACR 8.8 with PS with Help / Updates and the old DNGs will magically work with HDR Pro, or it might be necessary to recreate new DNGs from the old DNGs before the correct white-point information is used--which was the actual problem, Adobe was using the wrong white-point information in their raw conversions.

So try just installing ACR 8.8 and if things are still pink then make new DNGs from your old DNGs (if that is possible) with the DNG Converter 8.8.

Notes about the 8.8 release and links are here:
http://blogs.adobe.com/lightroomjourn...