Photoshop/Lightroom: Performance using Intel® Turbo Boost Max Technology 3.0

  • 1
  • Question
  • Updated 2 months ago
  • (Edited)
Sooo... I ordered and paid a Intel Core i7-7820X (plus motherboard, ram etc) 3 months ago. Unfortunately Intel is incapable of delivering this CPU and I have to decide whether I keep waiting, switch to a higher model i9-9820X/i9-9900X or go a step down to the i7-7800X. Or even switch to AMD. But reliable source have tested and found that they are 20 - 30% slower on Adobe products.

Another option would be to return everything I have and switch to the 1151 platform...

I chose the X-299 platform because of 4 channel memory and the ability to eventually go to 128 GB of ram. I know that the i7-9900K can eat 128 GB of ram as well but on a 2 memory channel architecture. And I don't want to have to go back to selecting a motherboard.

My main question is, what's the experience of you out there which might have  a CPU that uses Intel® Turbo Boost Max Technology 3.0 technology, if it's worth it to cough up more coin to switch up, or get the i7-7800Xone (similar specs in terms of clocking and so) but without Intel® Turbo Boost Max Technology 3.0.

As far as I know the Adobe apps are not champions at using more cores, but rather prefer less cores with higher frequency. Which is Turbo Boost Max 3's premise.

Any input on this would be  greatly appreciated. I am mainly using Lightroom and Photoshop with large stitched panoramas and multi layer documents.

Thanks in advance for your five cents!

-Alex
Photo of Alex Furer

Alex Furer

  • 158 Posts
  • 40 Reply Likes

Posted 2 months ago

  • 1
Photo of Scott Bufkin

Scott Bufkin

  • 22 Posts
  • 13 Reply Likes
I upgraded last year to an I7-6800K 6-core.  In retrospect, I should have got a 4-core with higher clock speed.  There are several processes I do in PS where I sit back in the chair and wait.  Looking at PerfMon, one core is over 90% and the rest are idle.  You're right that Adobe doesn't use multiple cores well - or at all in some cases.

Regarding Intel's Turbo Boost, I configured it to work only on PS and Bridge.  I can honestly say that I don't see any difference at all when it's on or off.

Hope this helps.
Photo of Todd Shaner

Todd Shaner, Champion

  • 1420 Posts
  • 469 Reply Likes
I'm using a six core i7-8700K and Z370 chipset with very good performance in both LR and PS. Full system specs here: https://forums.adobe.com/message/10749086#10749086

Photo of Alex Furer

Alex Furer

  • 158 Posts
  • 40 Reply Likes
Thank you both for your input! In the end I had to go for the 7800X and I am happy with it.

I already had the motherboard and everything. I was just waiting for the 7820X to be available. After three months I gave up. Shame on Intel!

The 7800X has 100 Mhz lower base clock, 300 Mhz lower turbo clock and no Turbo Boost 3.

I can still switch to a higher end model in the future as the motherboard is very durable. That in the hopes that Adobe apps will be better on multi threaded processing. Which I guess, from what I know about programming, is not entirely trivial.

One thing I have not looked into and only found out a few days ago is that apparently Adobe apps make use of the GPU inside the CPU. Meaning, maybe a gamer grade CPU would have an advantage. Besides that they easily run @ 5 Ghz.
Photo of Todd Shaner

Todd Shaner, Champion

  • 1388 Posts
  • 459 Reply Likes
One thing I have not looked into and only found out a few days ago is that apparently Adobe apps make use of the GPU inside the CPU. Meaning, maybe a gamer grade CPU would have an advantage. Besides that they easily run @ 5 Ghz.
The Intel processor integrated GPU is normally only used when the system has no external GPU (Nvidia, AMD) or when on battery power. You can achieve higher performance using an external GPU regardless of the Intel CPU series used.
Photo of Alex Furer

Alex Furer

  • 158 Posts
  • 40 Reply Likes
Thanks for shedding some light on this Todd!