Image displays correctly in Lightroom, but rotated in Windows.

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I doubt if emotions will help. A small percentage of images look fine in Lightroom, but Win7/64 shows upside down. Please see attached.
please advise.
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Mike LeDuc

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Posted 5 years ago

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Victoria Bampton - Lightroom Queen, Champion

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Where did the photos come from? It looks like they were scanned upside-down but have been rotated within LR. If I'm right, that rotation information is stored in the catalog and Windows won't know anything about it.
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Mike LeDuc

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You are correct, Victoria, and thanks for your thoughts.
I scanned many photos, later importing the .tiff files with 'Move' and included in the catalog. I added keywords, sometimes captions, and often do final image corrections in LR.
My general assumption that anything I do in LR is saved in the final .tiff for Windows seems to be an oversimplification. Yipes.
Is there a reference or source of which is which? I slap around among LR, PS, and Premiere Elements, even an old Photoshop Elements on a rare occasion. I'm trying to keep the catalog {>70k images} as the main organizational database. But if the connection from there to Windows is not a 1:1 ratio, I may have to rethink...
Thanks again.
mike
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Mike LeDuc

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Victoria, sorry to fumble around with this, but may I also ask:
When I do a 'Save Metadata to File' ~ is my assumption that I've updated everything to Windows correct? The example I used did not have the down-arrow indicator for unsaved/changed, so I thought I was OK.
I am however, one of those users who get recurring 'Changed Metadata' errors when absolutely nothing has changed. This happened through several updates, including the present Version 5.3. My Pictures folder, including catalog etc. is 1.87 TB (2,059,178,573,824 bytes on disk) with 103,123 files.
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Victoria Bampton - Lightroom Queen, Champion

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Yes, it means you've updated the metadata in the file, but Windows won't understand all of the metadata.

> Is there a reference or source of which is which?

Which is what?
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Mike LeDuc

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My 'which is which' confusion can be summarized by the original inverted image problem:
Which of all the programs tells Windows how to present the orientation?
Which programs present correctly but fail to properly instruct Windows?

Is there a guaranteed sequence of workflow to eliminate this intermittent error?
Or conversely, What am I doing wrong to create this anomaly?

The "This end up" datum just reveals a confidence crack in my understanding of good practice. What else could I be loosing in the translation starts to bother me. I deliver large blocks of my catalog to third parties, who mostly but not universally use Windows. I need to ensure their experience is as reliable as I can make it.
Thanks for bearing with my foggy head in this discussion!
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Robert Frost

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The simplest way is to use your camera manufacturers program to rotate the images. I always use NikonView to rotate my nefs; it saves the rotation in the correct place in the image file, and other programs then read this and rotate it properly. If I don't do this, funny things can happen as you have found out.

LR will rotate a file, but it only stores that info in the catalog or in the xmp, not in the file.

Bob Frost
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Victoria Bampton - Lightroom Queen, Champion

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If you're using Export (as JPEG/TIFF) to create files to give to the third parties, you'll be fine as it'll be rotating the photos properly in the process.
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Mike LeDuc

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Victoria and Robert, many thanks.
The Lightroom Queen correctly linked my presentation anomalies with the subset of .tif's coming from my flatbed scanner workflow. Robert follows the {sometimes} failure of LR to tell Win7/64 exactly what to do.
I'll change my flow to ensure the Export step, even to my own library. That not only keeps it simple, but those on my home network will see and get what they expect. I had been just doing a develop/save metadata and thinking I was cool. Wrong on many counts.

BTW, the PC screen saver is often repeated to the big ole flat screen in the living room as a random presentation. Better than politics or even the weather channel.

I'll take the advice at the bottom of my monitor right now: This topic has made me feel better with your input. Let's put it to bed. Happy New Year to you both!
mikey