Lightroom/Camera Raw: Ability to have Graduated filter NOT affect the area of image ABOVE the top of the filter

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  • Updated 2 years ago
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I'd like the Graduated filter in ACR/LR to NOT affect the area of image ABOVE the TOP of the filter. i.e. ONLY the area between the TOP & BOTTOM should be affected.Also, be nice to be able to adjust the midpoint in order to affect the hardness/softness.
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melvyn jacobs

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Posted 2 years ago

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Valter Daghetti

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I think if I understood well what you mean, you can use Viveza from NIK Collection Plugins now free with Photoshop, while for adjust hardness and softness you can use the Brush in LR
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melvyn jacobs

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Viveza ? - Nik Colour FX has Grad filters, but all coloured.  I really prefer to be in ACR/LR because I often apply ND Grad + Radial filters in tandem, so I want to be on the same screen
  
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Tim McMahon

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It would be very difficult to replicate the effect of a graduated ND filter.  
Could you achieve the same effect you're looking for using a wide-feathered adjustment brush?
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Robert Cullen

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The Radial filter can be extended well outside the image boundaries to affect only the area between its upper and lower 'circle' edge. With feathering and Invert as needed.
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melvyn jacobs

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yes, using a very wide thin radial filter seems to be a reasonable (not perfect) workaround.  i just view the Grad filter as a box selection & applying gradation within that.  
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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The Graduated filter is a LINE with feathering boundaries on either side, not a box with a top and bottom

You want either a double-line "graduated" filter or a rectangular "radial" filter.

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Rikk Flohr, Official Rep

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It is possible to work around this. Example:

1. Create a Graduated filter with -4 stops Exposure and +100 Saturation.
2. Draw it from the center of the screen to the bottom.  
3. Right click on the filter's adjustment pin to duplicate it.
4. Take the bottom line (0%) from the duplicate and move it upwards till it is one pixel past (above) the original graduated filter.  (May have to zoom in to do the fine tuning) Going one pixel above will invert the filter too. 
5. On the second filter, reverse the options +4 stops of Exposure and -100 Saturation. 

You have now limited the effects of the first graduated filter to its top line (100% line) and down.
(Edited)
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Rikk Flohr, Official Rep

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You could also achieve this using a single Graduated Filter and then using the Brush/Erase feature, with a super-wide Eraser Brush, using the [Shift]+[Click Method] to draw a straight line across the top of the Graduated Filter.  This is a little easier but not as crisp a demarkation line.
(Edited)
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Rory Hill

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Very helpful Rikk - good stuff.