Lightroom/Photoshop: I am curious as to why some color pickers are Hex or % and not the normal 0-255 #'s.

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I am curious as to why the color pickers inside of Lr and some in Ps are Hex or % and not the normal 0-255 #'s.
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Thomas M OConnor

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Posted 1 year ago

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Andrew Rodney

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It's just a differing approach to dividing up numbers. And I'd submit, 0-100 is a lot more intuitive especially for new users.  255 is white; that's intuitive? 

0-255 is an odd set of numbers in the scale when you think about it; it's based on the encoding of 8-bit values but none of the processing in LR is 8-bit anyway. Think about middle gray using either scale. 50% is an easy number to consider. 128 (actually 127.5) isn't. 

And then there's Lab readouts..... And the fact that Photoshop doesn't report aStar and bStar like LR does (Adobe, please fix that; it's much better in LR). 
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Joel Weisbrod

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If you are shooting 12 or 14 bit RAW photos, each channel has far more than 255 levels making it necessary to represent them in percentages. For JPG images, each channel is limited to 8 bits or 256 (0-255) but as LR uses a 16 bit color space by default (ProPhoto RGB) it needs to use percentages.

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Andrew Rodney

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Nitpicking (sorry) but LR doesn't do anything with ProPhoto RGB but export images in that color space. Processing is done in an unnamed color space using ProPhoto RGB Primaries and thus color gamut but the TRC is linear so it's not the same color space. Histograms outside soft proofing uses the same primaries but a 2.2 TRC that matches sRGB and is named Melissa RGB.
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Thomas M OConnor

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Thank you both for your  answers. Makes sense.