Photoshop: How do I save a SoftProof for illustration purpose?

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Hello,
I need to save a complete SoftProof preview (incl. paper color) in Photoshop to a JPEG file. How do i do this?

In my case it is for communication with vendors and photo labs,
where I need to show comparisons of image views next to each other.

- The end result should be:
A flat JPEG file, where the SoftProof is "baked into" the file.

Thank you.
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Foto VI

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Posted 5 years ago

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Chris Cox

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You can't really save a softproof (because it is just on screen).

Use Convert To Profile to convert your image to the print profile and save that, or do that and convert back to your working space profile to save as a "baked in" proof.
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Foto VI

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Hi Chris, thanks .. I have tried that already, and it works - except for the paper color.
So, I am not seeing the complete, media dependent proof.

Do I have to do this by reading the proofing profile's media data manually,
and apply it via curves?
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Chris Cox

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No, that is doing exactly what the softproof does.
Absolute Colorimetric is how you get the paper color (it is the only intent that would include the paper color).
It sounds a bit like you chose relative colorimetric by mistake.
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Todd Shaner

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Chris, isn't 'Simulate Paper Color' only available in the onscreen Proof Colors view. Why would you ever want 'Convert To Profile' to apply 'Simulate Paper Color?' Sorry, but I'm a bit confused as well.
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Chris Cox

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Yes, but that's just a way of saying "use absolute colorimetric intent" in the conversions.
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Todd Shaner

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Sorry, but I'm still not seeing the same effect as 'Simulate Paper Color' in the 'Convert To Profile' image. The 'Proof Color' image is much lighter, as expected with 'Simulate Paper Color' selected.
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Foto VI

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That is true, Todd.
We are on the same page.
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Todd Shaner

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1) Open the image and create a Duplicate copy.
2) On the Duplicate image set PS's View to 'Proof Colors' with the target color profile and 'Simulate Paper Color' selected.
3) Window both images and set them side-by-side for your compare view image.
2) Hit the Print Screen button, go to File>New>Advanced and change the Color Profile to your monitor's profile, and Save as a TIFF file.

You can add a text layer on the images to indicate the Original and COLOR_PROFILE_Proof image.

As long as your monitor's gamut is the same or wider than the viewer's monitor the image color's should be fairly accurate. This of course requires they use a color managed application like PS to view the file.
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Foto VI

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Thanks :)
A screen capture will do for a one time quick-and dirty,
I need a systematical approach, though.
One, that isn't limited to a screen's resolution.
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Todd Shaner

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As Chris mentioned 'Proof Colors' applies the soft proof settings to the screen image only, not the working image inside PS. The only way to output that image is through screen image capture as 'Simulate Paper Color' is not offered using Convert To Profile.

I'm not sure why you are concerned with the captured image size since the image is only to be used by others for screen viewing. I would create an Action with all of the steps to capture and process the soft proof screen image. You can add 'Full Screen' (F key) and then 'Fit On Screen' (CTRL+0) steps in the Action to maximize the image size.

Personally anyone who would find this beneficial should have PS installed on their viewing system. In addition 'Simulate Paper Color' is at best an approximation that is heavily influenced by the viewing conditions, which is out of your control.
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Sef

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Todd is right. The softproof view attempting to show what that's going to look like when printed, so best thing is to print a proof and send that.
But I understand you want to send your client something on screen. In that case a screen grab is the quickest solution, but should not be considered a proof.
You'll notice that if you do print an actual proof, the softproof on screen is only an approximation anyway, and will look different.
The only other alternative I can thing of is to make final set of softproof adjustments to your image that make it visually match the softproofed version. You could set that up as an action to run as a batch on your images at the end.