Photoshop: How do I change the overall color of an image so that its sky has exactly the same blue as the sky in another?

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How can I change the overall color of a layer of an image so that, for instance, the sky in that layer has exactly the same blue as the sky in another layer? I tried using your Match Color option, but it didn't seem to be what I was looking for. If I use the eyedropper tool to learn the statistics of a blue in one area, and then of a blue another area, the Image > Adjustments > Color Balance uses a whole different set of numbers. What do I do?
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Charles Wright

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Posted 7 years ago

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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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I would use a curves adjustment layer. Try these tutorials:

http://www.digitalmastery.com/downloa...

http://projectwoman.com/wordpress/201...
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Here's another tutorial for using the Match Color command:

http://www.photoshopessentials.com/ph...
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Charles Wright

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Dear Mr. Tranberry, thank you for providing those tutorials. They provide solutions for changing the color of a space within an image. What I was asking about was a way to change the color of an entire image or layer so that a space within it matched a space within another image or layer, the way a transparent filter does in an old-fashioned photo printer. If I know the CMYK numbers of the skies in two different images, for instance, how can I change the overall tint of one of the images so that its sky will be identical the other one's? The Image>Adjustments>Color Balance command doesn't use the CMYK numbers.
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Use a Curves Adjustment layer and a layer mask to apply the affect to just the sky.
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Charles Wright

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I don't want to apply the affect to just the sky. As I've mentioned numerous times here, I want to apply it to the whole image. Without having to resort to trial and error, how can I change the overall color of one image so that a PART of it, for instance the sky that has a flat color, will then have the identical color of, for instance, the sky in another image?
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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You keep saying you want *PART* of the image to match"

"overall color of one image so that a PART of it, for instance the sky that has a flat color, will then have the identical color of, for instance, the sky in another image?"

Sorry if I'm not understanding you, but you'll have to rephrase your question or post some sample images so we can better understand what you're trying to accomplish.

If you want the skies to match, use a curves adjustment layer to match the color (see the tutorials I posted above). An adjustment layer will affect the entire image. If you don't want the other colors to shift, use a layer mask to mask the effects of the adjustment on the areas you don't want changed.
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Charles Wright

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Isn't there some way to change an overall image using the two different sets of CMYK numbers of the two different skies? That would eliminate trial and error in adjusting the color.
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Michael Orts, Employee

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Hi Charles,

I don't know if this will help, but there is a way you can view the CMYK numbers while you're using Image > Adjustments > Color Balance.

Before going to into this command, choose the Window > Info command (or f8) to display the info panel. Inside of this panel you can click on an eyedropper to open up display options and select CMYK Color.

Now when you go into Image > Adjustments > Color Balance you can hover the eyedropper cursor over the image and see the info panel displaying the original and adjusted/preview color values.

Another approach is to select the Color Sampler tool located in the tools menu hidden underneath the eyedropper tool (I). Place up to four color samplers on your image and use the same eyedropper popup menu in the info panel to select CMYK display info for each sampler location. Then enter the adjustment command and compare original and adjusted values.
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Charles Wright

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Many thanks, Michael! I'll try that.

I apologized to Jeffrey for my not looking at the tutorials carefully enough to realize that they're probably just what I need. With this help from both of you, I think I'll be fine!
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Cool. Enjoy.