Lightroom: How to batch correct import errors (especially PSD files that are no longer compatible)?

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Just started using lightroom and imported my complete library of work.

I have SEVERAL thousand (2K) import errors due to compatibility of files
CREATED in Photoshop over the years (WTF)! 

"The files could not be read. Please re-open the files in Photoshop and save them with the ‘Maximize Compatibility’ preference enabled. (3232)"

While I realize that I can create an action to re-save with max compatibility, how can I batch call photoshop with the filelist generated in the error import log to do this??? 

Ideally how can I do this without changing the created date of the file... but that may be a step too much...
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Juan Julio

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Posted 2 weeks ago

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john beardsworth

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Here I refer you back to a previous post - if you had saved as TIF, you wouldn't have faced this problem. It's also the price for saving without allowing compatibility, which means the files have no embedded previews for LR or other apps to read. Anyway....

You are going to have to use an action. Is there a way to save that list as a text file, and does it include full paths to the files? If so, you would be able to save your action as a droplet, and then build a script to call the droplet multiple times in Mac Terminal or as a Windows batch file. The viability of doing this depends on your skills with editing text files.

But it might be easier to select them using Bridge and use Tools > Photoshop > Image Processor which lets you point to the action.
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Juan Julio

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So I looked into droplets, and I don't think they would work as they don't take a text file list as input.

I could call photoshop from a shell file, just don't know how to invoke photoshop to perform an action from the command line!
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john beardsworth

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To repeat or rephrase what I said before, I would be invoking the droplet (not Photoshop) using a text file that I had manipulated (edited) into a list of command line instructions.
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Juan Julio

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Sorry to make you repeat yourself, I'm learning about this!  I only found simple videos on how to create droplets that resize etc.  I wasn't aware that you could create some that execute commands in a text file.  Let me look for those if I understood correctly.

The reference to photoshop was about calling a shell script- but I found out that it does not support shell commands.  I did read something about applescript being supported, but that was very old documentation and not sure if it still is.

Thanks for your time and tips!
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john beardsworth

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Maybe I should have just said rephrase!

There are many ways to automate PS. In this case Shell to Droplet is the route I would follow if I already have the action and can get the file paths as text. You can also automate PS with AppleScript, Visual Basic and JavaScript - I prefer the latter as it is cross platform and is used in Image Processor, but the others have advantages in other situations.



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Actually, thanks to Jerry your idea of automating within bridge seems to work- even across folders.  I just ran my first test across a few folders and everything worked, so I'm now indexing a whole year of problem images, then going to try it.  Fingers crossed!!!

This guide provides detail:
https://myemail.constantcontact.com/Ask-Tim-Grey---Automating-Maximize-Compatibility---May-20--2011....

In bridge, you have to show items from subfolders, select photoshop files in filters, then start the batch job!  Shame Adobe doesn't have this as a wiki!

Thanks again for all your help!

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What they SHOULD do is import the files anyway, with a generic icon, and have a built-in script that would open and resave them in Photoshop.
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Juan Julio

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Agree.  These are their products that are incompatible with their newer stuff...  There needs to be an automated migration strategy.  I'm sure I'm not the only long time user of Photoshop who adopted their PSD format (which views fine in bridge!)
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john beardsworth

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Agree too. But that ship sailed long ago.
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Juan Julio

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Ok, so I ran a test, opened one of my PSD files from 2011 in photoshop CC 2018 which has "maximize compatibility" enabled, opened fine, removed a watermark layer, then saved it.  It still wouldn't import into lightroom!

Saved it as a TIFF and it did.

Saved the TIF as a PSD and that PSD opened.

What exactly do I need to do in my action?
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Juan Julio

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Oops- I need to do a save as not a save
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John R. Ellis, Champion

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"save as not a save"

For future reference, that's a long-standing bug in Photoshop that Adobe has decided not to prioritize: https://feedback.photoshop.com/photoshop_family/topics/photoshop-bug-changing-maximize-compatibility...
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Good catch John!
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Juan Julio

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Thanks for your patience.  I read that initially then I read that it wasn't possible to mass edit, so I forgot about that part!

That seems like the best strategy so far!

Ok, so I recorded the action in PS and found out that Bridge 2017 no longer has the batch tool, so I installed Bridge 6, and it has it but won't play well with Photoshop CC 2018 GRRRR  I guess I need an older version of photoshop too!
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john beardsworth

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Well why not use Bridge 2018? It does have Image Processor.
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Juan Julio

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I had uninstalled it since it no longer supported web output.. but just ran the updater and success!

 I just ran my first test across a few folders and everything worked, so I'm now indexing a whole year of problem images, then going to try it.  Fingers crossed!!!

Thanks again for everyone's help, and hopefully this works!

(Edited)
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john beardsworth

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Yeah, Bridge 2018 is a bit of a mess. I don't care about the web output but they dumped the File > Info Advanced tab which let you get into the detail of metadata problems.
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Juan Julio

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Agree- installing it from CC also "upgrades" your old installs grrr
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Juan Julio

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So the solution that seems to work is this

https://myemail.constantcontact.com/Ask-Tim-Grey---Automating-Maximize-Compatibility---May-20--2011....

combined with using bridge’s “show items in subfolders"  and to process groups of subfolders (for me year).

So in 12h or so I was finally able to get bridge to scan an entire year of photos (500 PSD/ 12k photos) on my NAS drive and eventually batch process them/import them into lightroom.

It was more painful than it should have been.  Bridge seems to just get stuck creating indexes.  (I had created indexes/previews before and saved them at subfolder level) - never using “show items in subfolder”.  Ooh, and everytime you process a few hundred files, and try to start another batch Bridge fails with a java error...

It took stopping/restarting bridge a few times, hitting refresh...  not sure what the best way to do this is.  If anyone knows the best way to create an index for this purpose is (without creating previews) would appreciate your thoughts!  But this way at least in a few days I’ll be done!




(Edited)
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For future reference, there's no need to use Bridge. You can apply a droplet to a batch of photos directly from within LR, with two methods:

- Define an external-editor preset in Preferences > External Editing. 

- Define an export preset with Post-Processing > After Export set to Open In Other Application, with the application set to the droplet.

Both of these methods will create a copy of the photo and run the droplet on it, stacking the edited version with the original.
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john beardsworth

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The problem is that the OP can't get the photos into LR in the first place.
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John R. Ellis, Champion

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Oops, right.