how many images can be added to photoshop to be edited at once??

  • 1
  • Question
  • Updated 9 months ago
I'm going to File, Scripts, Load Files into Stack, Browse for the file images, I'm selecting a file of about 700 images taken with an Iphone.  and it acts like everything is going well but then after it loads it turns black and doesn't let me select any options. It's not frozen but it does not allow me to select any options/ it makes error sounds over everything I click. WHAT IS THE MAX AMOUNT OF IMAGES I CAN ADD AND EDIT PER BATCH??? I'M SO CONFUSED.
Photo of alana harris

alana harris

  • 6 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes

Posted 9 months ago

  • 1
Photo of Abambo

Abambo

  • 22 Posts
  • 3 Reply Likes
For me, the limit was always what my machine allowed me in resources especialliy memory.
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 547 Posts
  • 64 Reply Likes
Alana,  

I know you're confused by this but it's not about your Adobe software.  Whenever a screen flashes to black for a second or more, it's all about your screen driver and its video card on your computer, and how much it can handle at once.  Your card has a memory buffer.  And it seems you have maxed out that memory module.  And no matter how large it may be, 700 photos will max it out.  You need to try to open perhaps less than 20-50 at a time so as not to over max your machine.   Please trust me on this.   It may allow you to open them later in lower numbers but I don't over-load the computer.   If you do, your computer will have a worse response later.   

There are only two reasons, a video card will turn the screen to black and one of them is insufficient memory on the card.  The other is when a hacker invades your computer and then it only goes black for a second then turns normal.  That is NOT the issue.     

Opening 700 photos from a phone camera is a huge amount.  When a phone takes pictures and it's set for high performance, it is not set for high resolution.  Instead, it's set for very large photos.  Large photos on a phone means 48 X 72 inch instead of 4 X 6 photos.   Although the first dimension will break down to the other, phones deliver the higher dimension.   Phones do this in a response to users who want high resolution.  This is not true high resolution, but this is a camera manufacturer's way of getting large photos to be edited as 4 X 6.  They will not enlarge.  All of them are actually at low resolution.   Phone photo resolution is an extremely low 24 dpi instead of the usual 72 dpi for JPEG photos, and even those won't enlarge or edit well.   

There are iPhones and Androids that can retain their high resolution at 72 by making them large volume photographs (even larger in dimension than mentioned above) and I think you may have those.   By opening those at once, you are totally over-loading your computer.   I don't think there is a computer that can handle that many at once without crashing the Operating System.  

If you cannot open a few at a time, then you need to transfer them to a folder, first.  After that, you can load them at a safe rate of 20 to 50 at a time to Photoshop, to "feel" the strength of your computer first, then increase the numbers later.   Professionals always load low numbers at a time.  
The reply above says it all.   It's only how much your computer will take.  But yours will not take 700.   Also, the Organizer in Photoshop has had problems with large volumes but I have never heard of 700 photos being opened.  

I have all of Adobe Photoshop's.   I've been with Adobe products since the beginning of Photoshop.  All that time, I was an engineer at Microsoft.   

Steve Lehman, MCSE Windows engineer, responding for Adobe   
Photo of alana harris

alana harris

  • 6 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Thank you for your time to write that detailed response. I am very new to Photoshop. I guess I figured that someone like a photographer would edit at least "hundreds" of photos at a time on Photoshop so surely it must somehow support such a function. For my business I picture merchandise and editing and resizing 500-1000 iphone photos at a time was something that was pretty easy and user friendly on a Mac computer. I thought I was upgrading by switching to intel core 17 and downloading Photoshop but what I'm figuring out is that Photoshop just isn't right for me and what I do.
Any advice?
Photo of alana harris

alana harris

  • 6 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Thank you for your time to write that detailed response. I am very new to Photoshop. I guess I figured that someone like a photographer would edit at least "hundreds" of photos at a time on Photoshop so surely it must somehow support such a function. For my business I picture merchandise and editing and resizing 500-1000 iphone photos at a time was something that was pretty easy and user friendly on a Mac computer. I thought I was upgrading by switching to intel core 17 and downloading Photoshop but what I'm figuring out is that Photoshop just isn't right for me and what I do.
Any advice?
Photo of Todd Shaner

Todd Shaner, Champion

  • 912 Posts
  • 279 Reply Likes
For "normal" editing and resizing of multiple images 'Load Files into Stack' is not what what you want to use. If you're not experienced with Photoshop you may find Lightroom easier to use for editing and resizing your product image files. It's included along with Photoshop in the Adobe Photography plan:

https://www.adobe.com/products/photoshop-lightroom.html
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 547 Posts
  • 64 Reply Likes
Hi again Alana,  

Changing to a higher speed processor can make things more simple.  But trust Photoshop to do more.   

Here's what to do:  You need to copy your photos into a folder.  Then you in Photoshop, don't open that folder.  In Photoshop, click on File and click process multiple files and then select that same folder from there (at the top) and then the destination folder should be the same folder again.     You will be re-sizing from one size to another, right in that same folder.  Select what size you want to change to and all of them will change size.  For example: if the photos are currently 48x72 - that's equal to 4X6 so use that as your new size.   That size can be used for product display on websites too.  

When that's complete, go to that same folder to load photos, maybe 200 at a time.  If it freezes your screen, try a lower number (best).  This may help you like Photoshop again once you find that its engine will change photo sizes automatically.   

Surely, I'm a Windows engineer, but the differences between Mac and Windows are simple. Mac commands are relatively the same by another name, and few are from (old) Unix.  Windows uses an interpreter (DOS) between its Windows Graphics User Interface (GUI) and binary language, 1's and 0's (machine language).  Your Mac uses a buffer (memory) between its GUI and binary language.   

Steve Lehman, MCSE   
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 547 Posts
  • 64 Reply Likes
Hey there Alana Harris, 

Today, I want to teach you how to process large volumes of photographs;   
Large photographers have no problem with volume but there's a reason:  

Since you mentioned an i-7 processor, I'd like to add that your clock speed won't have much effect on handling large loads.  It's your memory share between ram memory and virtual memory that handles the load.   Your processor will do a checksum to determine what takes the load and it always ends up in a memory toggle between modules.  We cannot rely on the processor for loads.  For speeds, it does very well and even with that, but its the video card that handles most of that, as the processor cannot handle all of the video responsibilities.   There is memory on the video card that's even more important (extremely), and more than the ram or virtual memories.  

Game players have fast processors but they rely on memory on the video card.  Your computer probably came with a standard 64 or 128 Mb of memory for buffering, depending on the company and year.  Game players use a terrabyte of memory as they spend gobs of money on video cards, and even that's not good enough, and it get terrifically expensive for them and they are serious.  
They get a big video card and they also get a game player's keyboard that "zooms!".     

I am not a game player but I use a game players' keyboard nevertheless.  It's accurate, easy to see as it's lit up on every key, and its speed, no matter how fast we are, is very accurate.  Game-keys are mechanical not digital.  Yours probably has a digital wire-loop keyboard membrane under the keys, and under your number pad is their processor, much like a computer processor that deciphers your key strokes, then will transmit to the main processor, then it's all translated to the video, and all of that happens in 1/2 of a second.  A game players keyboard is a mechanic keyboard and it doesn't have a wire-loop membrane, or a processor under its key pad.  It clacks much like a real typewriter but its action is short key strokes and fast with an edge to each key instead of a shoulder so we will be very accurate while typing.  My point is, we don't have different computers, we only buy faster things that work better.  

An i-7 processor is fast but not the fastest but for right now it's the quickest.   But it's the video memory that powers the computer for the game players.   Likewise, if you intend to process hundreds of photos at once, you should look toward your video card as having the power for that.  If you think your computer lacks in power, then think about increasing your video card power.  You may not need more memory on that card, as there are video cards that work faster without the adding memory.  Find a video card that's designed for game players.  They can be expensive but if you want to process photographs like a photographer in large volume, increase your video card's speed or get one that's advertised as "zooming!" and it's intended for game players.   When you get a faster card, and you begin processing large volumes, you may also get that black screen effect, because as we increase our video speed, we sometimes forget that we may be over-taxing our video card again.  Be wise, be consistent with the same numbers, and play nice with your computer.  

Although I am not a game player, I have a game player's keyboard.  They come with odd names that only kids in their 20's enjoy.  So, don't be spooked by their names.  And many of them have skeletons pictured on them.  Kids like that stuff.   They are only model names.  My keyboard has the model name, "Corsair Gaming".   Corsair is the company.  It's a zooming keyboard, and it's very accurate.  And it clacks.  Yours is most likely the "silent keyboard" that came with your computer.   If you don't like noise, don't get a game player's keyboard.   They have noisy clacking, but it's the metal keys (bottoms) hitting the metal sensors (below the bottoms) and each sensor is very accurate.   Instead of being processed which sometimes can deliver a wrong key stroke, the mechanical type of keyboard will get it right.   We don't have a processor under our key pad.  Even our key pad has clacking.   And all of the keys are lit up in any color you want and some have lights in keys according to the games a player might be playing.  So it will light up only on the game keys for a particular game, or can be switched to all keys lighted.  AND, we can dim the lights, make them brighter, or make them beam with lots of light.  But because my keys are lit, I have gone back to typing in the dark like I did at Microsoft, as I always turned off my lights overhead to see the screen better.   My windows were covered.  The kids call these keyboards, "kick-ass keys".   After 30 years in the software business, I still enjoy the new devices that come along.   They are amazing.  Their price tag is over a hundred.  The video card will be more important to you.   

Video card brands won't be the factor nor the pricing.  Maybe get 128 Mb of memory (or 264 Mb if you have the money).  When it's installed, either it needs to be introduced to the BIOS with a software disc, or some of them will automatically "add-on" to the BIOS as it's installed and connected.   When they are installed, they need a small screw as a  "hold down" and the screw goes onto the side-frame-rail, inside in the computer box.   Get the kind that has a software disc with it.   The reason for this is important.   They are updated periodically.   Not updating a video card, forces Windows to update it but sometimes the wrong update gets to the wrong card.   So, buy a video card that has a driver disc to install with it.  Video cards don't have much of a driver.  They reside in the ram with only 256 to 310 Kb of memory.   Some of them are smaller than a keyboard driver.  

Large photo companies will have these.  Also, large volume photo warehouses that provide images to photographers have these.  Getty is one of those.   Getty is one of the oldest photo and heritage warehouses in the world.  They are located here in Seattle, in Chicago, L.A., in NYC, and in UK where they began.   In Malibu, CA is the Getty Mansion only 2 blocks up the bluff from the beach.   Getty has large computers, but their work-stations still need large video cards like the kind I described, and Getty processes huge volumes of photographs among many teams.   

A larger video card will increase your photo process speed.   
If you have any questions about this, feel free to send them.   

Steve Lehman, MCSE   
Photo of alana harris

alana harris

  • 6 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
Steve, 
You are magic. Thank you so much for your time. All this helps me a lot. 
What a great community!
I should be able to manage from here.. THANK YOU!!
Photo of eartho

eartho

  • 744 Posts
  • 183 Reply Likes
Steve, what in the world are you talking about? Gamers have machines with a terabyte of memory? Then you suggest Alana buy a card with 128MB of memory?? What? Do they even make cards with less than 512MB of memory these days? Is this copypasta from the 90s?

Alana, whatever you read above from Steve, please disregard as it's absolutely useless information to try and decipher.
Photo of alana harris

alana harris

  • 6 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
hahaha, 
thank you guys, really but all this awesome info is just saving me a LOT of time in figuring out that phtotshop is a little too complex for me. I've already moved on :) 
but really THANK YOU!!
Photo of eartho

eartho

  • 744 Posts
  • 183 Reply Likes
> A larger video card will increase your photo process speed.

This is simply not true. The biggest increase in speed comes from ram, ssd and processor. 
Photo of eartho

eartho

  • 744 Posts
  • 183 Reply Likes
You're simply using the wrong script. What you're looking for is File/Scripts/Image Processor.
Photo of alana harris

alana harris

  • 6 Posts
  • 0 Reply Likes
thanks for the tip!
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 547 Posts
  • 64 Reply Likes
Eartho, 

Alana knows who to trust here.  I may have dropped the ball on the amount of memory but she needs to afford a small card. The number of photos is dependent upon the video card.   I'm an engineer, you are not, and I build computers, you do not.   With my 4 year degree in technology at a University, and 8 engineering certification, and 17 years with Microsoft, I think I am credited to giving trusted advice.   You are discrediting people randomly in chat rooms.   Look for a conversation on Twitter.  On Twitter, I hear there's a guy named Don who begs to be discredited.   

Steve Lehman, MCSE     
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 547 Posts
  • 64 Reply Likes
Alana, 
Disregard Eartho, he is not a tech here.   You won't find what he advised in Elements.  And in the regular Photoshop that panel does not have a photo size adjustment.  It only changes the format.   In the panel I gave you there is a size adjustment.   Thanks for trusting me Alana.   

Steve L.  


 
Photo of Todd Shaner

Todd Shaner, Champion

  • 912 Posts
  • 279 Reply Likes
Steve, this isn't helpful. The OP alana harris has already said PS is "too complicated" and has moved on. In the future can I suggest keeping replies "less technical" and stay focused on the OP's specific issue. Thank you!

FWIW- I am also an engineer and concur with eartho's comments.
Photo of eartho

eartho

  • 744 Posts
  • 183 Reply Likes
Mods, can you please do something about this person who is threatening me with legal action for pointing out that he's incorrect?

Thanks very much.
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 544 Posts
  • 64 Reply Likes
Eartho, please go back to Twitter.   
Photo of Steve Lehman

Steve Lehman

  • 547 Posts
  • 64 Reply Likes
I do not agree with Eartho or you on this topic.  In the past, video has robbed the ram.   And your comment about Light Room was correct, but elements will do the same task.  And, the panel Eartho referred to does not convert size.   But when I am wrong I admit it and you cannot.   This was a random act of harassment from a drop in.   Maybe I should quit this.   Your are right Todd, I am too technical for you.   Adobe does not deserve a windows engineer.