Photoshop: HDR PRO Image Cloudiness

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  • Problem
  • Updated 7 years ago
  • Solved
  • (Edited)
PS HD Pro images appear "cloudy" versus source images. I am going to HDR Pro via Lightroom using DNG files that have only had camera calibration adjustment made. Images taken with nikon D3X are 25 mg. Seven files are being merged(+1,2,3 and -1,2,3 exposures). I am using local adaptation 16 bit in HDR Pro dialogue box. Cranking Gamma to 2 or 3 helps a bit but creates other issues. Anybody else with this problem? thx
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Phillip

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Posted 7 years ago

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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Does the "Remove Ghosting" checkbox help?
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Chris Cox

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Are they really cloudy, or just lower contrast?
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Howard Pinsky, Champion

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Phillip. Are you able to provide an image of the result that you're getting?
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Phillip

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Thanks very much for your replies. It is not a ghosting issue (I did check the ghosting box). I guess that it is more of a low contrast issue as Chris above indicates. I am able to correct it by dialing up Gamma and then reducing exposure a bit. The photorealistic high contrast "pull down" with some tweaking also helps alot. I can then get a pretty good image after using levels, curves etc in PS. I checked with a local PS instructor at Rayko here in SF and they indicated that the initial results were not unusual---the HDR image often looks horrible at first until adjusted.

I was just surprised at the degree of adjustment that needed to be made after the initial HDR image appeared. I consider my problem solved at this point but would welcome any additional comments/suggestions that you have on this topic.

Cheers,

Phil
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Chris Cox

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HDR images are proportional to the photons hitting the camera sensor -- they are going to be much lower contrast than what you are used to seeing in JPEGs and other rendered images. Even ACR by default increases contrast because camera RAW images are similar to HDR images, and most people don't like the low contrast "real" appearance of camera RAW images.
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Philip,

Many people do additional adjustments in Adobe Camera Raw after they tone-map their 32-bit HDR images to 16-bit tiffs.

Try these tutorials from Russell Brown:

http://www.russellbrown.com/tips_tech...

CS5 Script: Edit Layers in ACR

CS5: Natural HDR Toning Technique