Bridge: Generate monitor size previews to fit in Bridge

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  • Updated 3 years ago
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Presently, Bridge generates "monitor size previews" based on the longest dimension of your display. This causes poor sharpness with full-screen 3:2 and 4:3 landscape-format images on widescreen displays and projectors, due to resampling to fit.

It would be better if it generated a preview size which fits the display exactly (e.g. 1200 pixels tall on a 1920x1200 display), or, even better, a user-defined display window (e.g. 1400x1050 for a projector). This way, a cached preview could be displayed at 100% and retain sharpness.
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Yammer

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Posted 7 years ago

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Yammer

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Actually, the simplest implementation might be a 2-choice selection: Generate monitor-size previews to fit / Generate monitor-size previews to fill. However, that doesn't help if you want to project images later.
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Yammer

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It occurred to me that I haven't shown how important this "effect" is for photographers and image retouchers:

If you use Bridge to import photos, and then use it to reject, categorise and rank your images, it's important that the full-screen preview gives a good representation of the image's sharpness.

At the moment, this is not the case. Images are regularly displayed unnecessarily soft. There is no satisfactory workaround, as, using Slide Show with Scaled to Fill only works well with landscape-format images.
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Jean Christoph Hasel

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Hello,

Try this !

First spacebar your raw or dng. At this point it is in full screen mode and quiet unsharp.
Then left click the full screen view and you are now seeing with a magnifying glass. Now it is sharp. Just drag and drop the mouse over the area you need to check.

At this point, a single click will drop you back in full screen view and you have to spacebar again to go back to grid view. Quiet boring!
Better press the escape button for acceding directly the grid mode.

Hope this helps !
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Yammer

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Yes, I'm aware of this. It's far from ideal though, because of several disadvantages:

* You can't see the whole image. Zooming to 100% may take several zooms to assess the image.

* On my system (an overdriven Core2Duo) it takes 5 seconds per raw image to generate a 100% preview.

* Avoiding the 5-second delay involves generating 100% previews on first contact, and storing them permanently, causing a big slowdown and a waste of resources. 100 shots = 8 minutes and about 400MB for me.

It would be a lot quicker and simpler just to generate a preview which stays sharp in full-screen view.
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Tim Lookingbill

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Have you tried "Review Mode" (Command 'B')? I'm on a 2010 Mac MIni OS 10.6.8, 2.4ghz Core2Duo running a 21" Dell 2209WA and in this preview mode I get sharp previews but the images are not at full size. It pretty much acts like Snow Leopard's "Cover Flow" only the half sized previews are sharp.

I'm working with 3000x2000 size Raws and even viewing that at 100% requires full screen mode to see most of it. I can't imagine those with 18MP images are having to deal with.

And that 5 second delay on 100% Loupe preview is what I get both in CS3 Bridge back when I was on a 1.8 ghz G5 iMac and CS5 on the Mac Mini which I just installed and started using. Wonder if things would speed up if Bridge was 64 bit Intel optimized.

I can't believe with all this Ram and processing horsepower we still have issues getting accurate previews quickly or limited accuracy at 100% view. I just tried the new ACR 6.6 and some images using "2010 Process" show sharpness at 40% view while others don't. Or maybe this new rendering is just showing the difference from the old process with the same sharpening level applied.

There's so many preview options now that it's hard to figure out which one to use.
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Yammer

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I have used Review Mode before, but only when whittling down a selection. Thanks for the tip.

Looking at a batch of 'iffy' telephoto shots I was struggling with last week, the sharp photos do look sharper in Review Mode, and the soft photos look sharper too, but not as much. I guess this is due to the larger resampling ratio to make the photos smaller. I'll have to give this some more assessment.

On the downside, the photos are a bit small, being about 2/3 full height, and Ctrl-O doesn't seem to work (Ctrl-R does, however).
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Tim Lookingbill

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Since I found this thread in a google search on workflow changes related to previews going from CS3 to CS5 I'm going to outline just one 'A' to 'B' workflow scenario I do over and over. Maybe this will give the Adobe elves something to consider in simplifying what amounts to just making images look their best for web and print viewing. Note how many words that took to outline that.

In CS3 for quick web upload I process my Raw images using "Image Processor..." buried in Bridge's Tools menu. A great tool for ACR only xmp edit workflows. I can select an entire folder of images in Bridge and automate downsizing, converting to sRGB and saving the image to one folder in two "Return" keyboard hits.

I love it. I don't have to go through Photoshop's tool menus to do the same thing even though I could create an action script but then the very reason for me to adjust for sharpening and saturation is moot due to the fact an action script would have to be stopped so I could assess what downsizing does. It's clunky anyway.

Also I thought by upgrading to CS5 ACR's previews would be more accurate at other zoom levels like say 700 pixel wide and I'm seeing they aren't. Or are they and I just have to wait for some cached previews to kick in. I can't tell yet. I can't assess the image quality of an image viewed at 100% in ACR. The image is too big even for 3000x2000.

The ACR preview in CS3 at 40% (largest zoom to show the entire frame) doesn't show accurate previews for sharpening and saturation applying both "Detail" and "Lens Correction" panel edits. I have to open in Photoshop, downsize the image and, whether it looks acceptable there, close the image and go back into ACR to adjust sharpening and saturation and then use "Image Processor...". Just explaining this workflow is giving me a headache.

Asking again...Does ACR 6.6 offer more accurate previews at other zoom levels other than 100%?
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Yammer

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I can't say I have noticed any difference in Bridge preview sharpness from one version of Camera Raw to another. This is the first time I have heard it suggested.

The problem is a Domino Effect:
1. Bridge creates a cache preview image which cannot be shown at 100% on widescreen displays in lansdscape orientation, nor any display in portrait orientation...
2. Full screen previews may require Bridge to pass the cache preview jpeg to the graphics processor for resampling to fit the display.

It is this resampling which causes full-screen preview softness. But this would not be necessary if Bridge created a true "monitor-size" preview in the first place, i.e. one which *already* fits the display.
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Tim Lookingbill

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Need to make a correction about the time it takes for the Loupe/Magnifying glass tool to show accurate 100% previews. It doesn't take 5 seconds. It now only takes 2-3 seconds.

The space bar activated "Full Screen" preview from Bridge does not show accurate sharpening levels nor does Review Mode (Command 'B'). I purged the cache for that particular folder and restarted Bridge (which BTW is instantaneous over CS3's "Spinning Beachball" 12 second start up). Just that alone is worth the price for the upgrade.

Anyway ACR 6.6 does show slightly improved sharpening results at 40% view but only after selecting "2010 Process" as mentioned earlier.

So far I've seen 4 different levels of sharpening in all the previews outside Photoshop and that is the Bridge main preview is the softest, then "Full Screen"/Review Mode is less soft and ACR 6.6 even at 40% is sharper and finally 100% being the sharpest.
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RANDAL QUEEN

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Again, we had this problem in CS3 and they did add

"A new preference to enable High Quality Preview has been added to Bridge's Preferences > Advanced panel. When enabled, the preference addresses the problem of a soft or blurry preview appearing in the Preview panel and in Slideshow mode." for 3.2.1.

That has since been taken out for a smaller more compressed cache for image previews. They have taken compression down to the point a 4.3MB image is now around 450k.
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Yammer

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I have since discovered that the full-screen preview is improved by selecting "Use Software Rendering".

This suggests to me that the Shrink to Fit algorithm is actually a function of the graphics card and not Adobe Bridge.

Power users from the graphics card forums suggest this issue is expected behaviour, as hardware rendering is built for speed, and not necessarily for quality.

Having said that, the principle still applies: if the cached jpeg was truly monitor-sized it would not need to be shrunk to fit.
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Carl Johan Pettersson

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I agree that the images for preview (the "1024"-folder) is incorrectly resized. When "Generate monitor-size previews" is checked, only the width is considered meaning further on-the-fly resizing is needed if the resulting image height is bigger than the screen resolution.

The correct way would be to compare both width and height to screen max:

Screen resolution 1680x1050

Image 3000x2000
-> Preview 1575x1050

Image 4000x2000
-> Preview 1680x840
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Axel Braun

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I know, this threat is quite old – but as I was struggling to find solutions for Yammer's problem for quite a while – and none of the suggestions posted here could help – I thought I should report on my findings.

It might sound too simple, it might have been a coincidence.. but for me (Bridge CS6 on 2012 MacBookPro) it worked:

1. I emptied the Cache
2. I enabled "Generate Monitor Size Previews"
3. I restarted Bridge

So far this was suggested here already – but my Previews were still blurry.

4. I went to the "1024" folder in the Cache folder and checked one of the newly created previews: instead of monitor size it was still 1024px wide

5. From the original hi-res file I created a new preview manually (1920px wide) and copy-pasted the file name from the "1024" folder. Then I replaced the preview file in the "1024" folder with my manually created 1920px-file.

6. I restarted Bridge to see what happened. Not surprising: now the preview was sharp. But what was indeed surprising: All the other previews of other files I opened in Bridge eversince were created in 1920px width (or stayed smaller if the files were smaller than screen size).

So: This work-around gave ok results for me. I have no clue how and why it works like this but I'm happy with the result.. ; )
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LEE SAXON

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This is incredibly strange.
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LEE SAXON

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The softness with GPU acceleration issue is even worse in Photoshop: http://diglloyd.com/blog/2015/2015112...

But I don't have the best eyes, so I can't really judge critical sharpness without going to 100% anyway. So for me Generate Monitor-Size Previews does enough well enough. And I just bought some new drives, so I have the space for it. Not sure this setting shouldn't be on by default.

More on the nigh-disaster that is GPU acceleration:

For me at least, Use Software Rendering slows full screen preview mode down to the point of almost uselessness. Even "spacebar to zoom" (which I didn't think was / I wouldn't think should be GPU accelerated since it goes to an unresampled image) turns to molasses.

This is strange because I don't have an underpowered processor (i5 2500K 3.3GHZ fed by 16GB of high quality RAM) but by modern standards I do have a fairly underpowered GPU (GTX 570, which in GPU terms is fairly ancient).