File types (PSD>JPG) do not change and save in CS6 like they did in CS5

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  • Updated 6 years ago
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I think this is a problem, and the Support folks, try as they might, were not able to help. If you'd like to look it up, it was case #0183396803.

This relates to an issue in CS6 that was not a problem in CS5 ... I don't know if it was an intentional change with CS6, or if I'm the only one experiencing it.

I have a CS5 workflow that I use daily, and have for a couple of years. It goes like this, if you'd like to recreate the steps yourself:

Step 1) open a JPG, add a layer or two. Do a Save or Save As ..... The default will be to save in PSD format; save it in Folder 1. Do not close the PSD file. Note that the extension in the title bar of the open file is .psd

Step 2) Flatten the PSD file. Do a Save As .... in JPG format to Folder 2. Do not close the file. Look at the extension in the title bar. In CS5, the extension always changed to JPG, and I could happily continue my workflow. However in CS6 (at least for me and my computer ... Mac Mini, OS X 10.6.8) the extension does not change to JPG. It remains PSD.

In my normal CS5 workflow the file would now show as a JPG, and I would now go to Step 3:

Step 3) With the JPG file from Step 2 still open, do a Convert to Profile (for my printer) and Save As ... as JPG to Folder 3.

At this stage in CS5, I would simply close this printer-profiled JPG and move on to repeat these same steps for the next image.

However, in CS6, the extension in the title bar of the open file never changes with the Save As ... steps from PSD to JPG. In CS6, if I want to Convert the Profile of the JPG I created in Step 2, I have to first Revert and close the open file (or Close and Don't Save Changes) to preserve the layered PSD. Then I have to navigate to and open the JPG I saved in Folder 2 before I can do the Convert to Profile. After doing the conversion and saving that file to Folder 3, I have to Revert (or Close and Don't Save Changes) so that my Step 2 JPG doesn't take on the printer profile.

It wasn't this tough to do in CS5. I like everything else I see in CS6 ... but this issue is really an issue for me.

If you would like to talk about this, lets do it over the phone ... chat is too cumbersome.

Thanks!

Tom Lesser 301-695-1221
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Tom Lesser

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Posted 6 years ago

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Tom Lesser

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Follow-up to my original post. I have just run through my workflow in CS6 on a Mac at the local community college, and found that my workflow goes without the issues I described in my original post, and behaves exactly in CS6 as it did in CS5 ..... so, it's probably not CS6, but something in my system. If anyone could advise me on anything that might "repair" whatever glitch occurs on my computer, I would be grateful. Thank you. Tom Lesser
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Tom Lesser

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Another follow-up. On the advice of the Mac lab manager at the community college, I did an update through the PS Help menu and now everything works exactly as it should. Tom Lesser
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Tom Lesser

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I think I found the real root of my problem, and thought I'd share it here just to finish out this situation.

I had an "ah-ha" moment today and think now that the trouble I experienced is all about bit-depth.

In CS5, my ACR Workflow Options were set for 8-bit output and my workflow was smooth. However, when I installed CS6, I set the workflow Options to output at 16-bit. As I progress through my workflow, I add adjustment layers, etc., and save the file (in CS6) as a PSD in 16-bit mode. When I simply flatten a PSD, it's still in 16-bit and that seems to be the reason that the .psd extension remains in the title bar file name even after doing a Saxe As ..... If I flatten the image and change to 8-bit mode the .jpg extension will appear in the title bar file name after doing a Save As.....
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lister.belfast

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The JPEG file format does not support 16 bit, so I'm guessing it would default to a format that can, PSD.
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Tom Lesser

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Yes, that seems to be the case. If you have a layered 16-bit file and select JPG format in the Save As ... dialog box, the file will be flattened and the new file you are creating will be changed to 8-bit and saved as a JPG, but what I have discovered working through this issue is that the open file remains in 16-bit, and as you suggest, defaults to PSD. So what I have done is add a mode change from 16 > 8-bit to my workflow after the editing is all done, then flatten and finish using the steps of my previous (CS5) workflow. Everything is now back on track :-)