Lightroom CC: Exporting presets + settings to LR Classic

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  • Problem
  • Updated 1 month ago
  • (Edited)
I don't get it. 

As a professional photographer, here's what I did:

Travelled to a faraway land for a photo shoot.
Converted RAW files in-camera to workable jpegs and imported them to my mobile device. Began editing with LRCC.
Made a ton of edits to these jpegs which were my rough-copy.
Got back to my studio, imported RAWs.
Tried to export my 'rough' settings from LRCC into Lightroom Classic CC...

Nope.

Is this for real? Not only could I not find a properly published help-file withing LRCC, I could find no way to import my settings into LR Classic. 

Honestly, I must be doing something wrong...Wasn't the Lightroom eco-system designed to facilitate this kind of workflow? Otherwise, I mean, what's the point of it all?

Thanks for some help...
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jbedford

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  • whaaaaaaaaaaaaaat.

Posted 2 months ago

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Marco Klompalberts

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By converting the RAW files in camera (or any other app for that matter) there will be settings applied that don't resemble the RAW file.
Say you then added clarity +25, brought down the highlights -30, shadows +40 and contrast +10 to the JPEG.
If you copy these settings to the RAW file it will not look the same as your final JPEG.
So what would be the point of copying these settings? The starting point (within LR) will simply not be the same, so copying settings will have different results.
Unless you can first apply some import/camera profile that the copying process adds the changes to.

If you made crops, then yes, that is a setting that can be copied to get the same look between the two.
Also, local adjustments could be copied as for the place they are applied to, but not the settings that were applied there.
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jbedford

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Thanks Marco,

As I implied, these are just rough starting points, but include colour adjustments which are time-consuming to duplicate and edit-from-scratch (I've cropped nothing). I know that the jpeg settings won't correspond directly to the out-of-camera RAW, but it helps save time down the road when I have to only make a few minor tweaks here and there to get back to the look I'm after.
(Edited)
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Marco Klompalberts

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I don't have JPEGs next to RAW, so I can't test right now.
But what happens if they show up next to each other in LR and you copy the settings from the JPG to the RAW (by synching or by pressing PREVIOUS?
I would expect to see everything (global and local adjustments as well as crop etc.) being copied.
You would have to do that for every single photo, though, if you have lots of local adjustments.
A preset would not help there either, I guess.
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jbedford

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OK, after some playing around, the roundabout way to do this is: 

Get your settings in order in LRCC. 
Create a preset in a new folder.
Export the preset to your LR Classic CC preset folder. 
Import the preset into LR Classic using the Import Preset dialogue.
The LRCC settings are now saved as .xmp which Classic can read and apply.

Should really be easier, but there it is for those of you in the same boat as me.
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Victoria Bampton - Lightroom Queen, Champion

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The short version is no, Lightroom wasn't designed to work like that. It was designed for you to import the raw files into mobile, edit them, let them sync to the cloud, and then sync down to your LR Classic catalog complete with edits. 
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john beardsworth

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See my Syncomatic plugin which copies adjustments and metadata from one type of file to a corresponding file, using filenames or capture time to match. The above comments about jpegs and about the intended LRCC workflow are true, but the plugin can automatically apply some of your editing work.