Export Fetures for layers with Photoshop Effects

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  • Updated 7 years ago
When you use layer effects like drop shadow. Or overlay settings like color dodge. And you want to export an element of a designed GUI for example. The problem often is if you want to make up the element in another software (programming a game for example) you have to export PNG files without any effects. So you would have to raserize effects to single layers. But very often when you raster them, the look totally changes, because their looks were clacluated by the layers lying below them. Color Dodge for example. So you have to mess around until you get a good result. Then you crop the image to transparent pixels and export.

It should be possible to "Export an elment" in photoshop: Which let's me create the region of the element. Like cropping. But it's actually just selecting the export region. Next would be to select the layers which are to be exported. And that image has to be divided into single PNGs for layering in another program. So Photoshop should ask me, which layers and effects get into which png file. For example there is a picture frame (created with emboss, drop shadow and gradient overly for glass effect). Now I could easily tell Photoshop: I need the frame one png, the drop shadow one png, the glass effect one png. Then I can simply overlay them in another program. I think the effects must somehow be baked? So they only work on the image I exported (because of their rendered look).

Now I can insert text or image between my layers and swap as often I want. I don't have to rasterize any layers. And don't have to crop myself. And have to think/do less maybe? :)
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Kenny

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Posted 7 years ago

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christoph pfaffenbichler, Champion

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I don’t understand where you are going with regard to Blend Modes.
As the results of many are indeed dependent on the underlying layer (except with certain colors naturally) it would seem moot to expect some normal-transparency-solution to achieve the same appearance.
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Chris Cox

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Without support for all of Photoshop's blend modes in other applications, that isn't going to work as you expect.
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Kenny

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If I have two layers. I put a gradient effect on the upper one. From white to transparent for example. Now if I would render it (which is not possible yet of course) the upper layer or evene better gradient effect itself becomes a new layer. Because there is no spcific blend mode. It is a simple rasterized gradient from white to transparent. If I instead use also a blend mode on it, photoshop would have to calculate also colors and such which will be created out of this blend mode (which calculates by the underlying layer). And add the information to the new rasterized layer. Of course then that new rendered layer only works on the same layer which it was rendered on. But for example a simple glass effect or inner shadow effect would be great to simply render to a layer. I often have to do that.
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Chris Cox

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There is a blend mode - because of the transparency. Fortunately "normal" is the blend mode that browsers and most other apps implement.

But a drop shadow is not a gradient. It's a shape with a blend mode of Multiply. Inner shadow is similar. Try exploding your styles to layers and change all the blend modes to normal -- see what it looks like :-).