Photoshop CS6: Gaps in Smart Objects imported from Illustrator

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  • Problem
  • Updated 7 months ago
  • Not a Problem
  • (Edited)
Hi,

I would like to report what I believe is an error in Photoshop CS6 (the latest patches have been installed).

I've only recently purchased CS6 Production Premium and have never posted in this forum before, so apologies in advance if this isn't the correct procedure for reporting errors.

In any case, I'd be grateful if someone knows a workaround as this problem unfortunately makes imported Smart Objects useless in Photoshop CS6.

Thanks in advance.
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SYMPTOMS: Gaps appear between elements when an Illustrator CS6 file is imported in Photoshop CS6 as a Smart Object.

Different Image Interpolation settings in Photoshop CS6 were already tested but to no avail.

ORGINAL VECTOR SQUARES IN ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR:


CLOSE-UP OF SQUARES AFTER IMPORTING THE .AI FILE AS A SMART OBJECT IN PHOTOSHOP:
Photo of msfog

msfog

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Posted 4 years ago

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Photo of Jeffrey Tranberry

Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Official Response
Hi,

As Chris stated, this is an artifact of trying to blend abutting vectors when converting them to pixels, antialiasing the edges, and blending them together. The math is as precise as it can be from the rasterization/blending algorithm. To avoid seams, the authoring tool (Illustrator) would have to merge the abutting shapes into one.

All applications have these artifacts because it is a math/rounding problem.

Acrobat (rendering your ai file):



Apple Preview (rendering your ai file):



Pixelmator (made from it's own vectors like your PS steps above):



Sketch (made from it's own vectors like your PS steps above):



It's possible to avoid/correct this problem when planning and designing your artwork in Illustrator by uniting/merging your abutting vectors (In your Photoshop example, select all 4 green shapes and hit Cmd + E to merge them so the seems go away) or overlapping the shapes instead of abutting them in the icon example.

If you were making this same design out of cut paper, you'd use one piece of paper instead of cutting it up into 4 smaller pieces if you didn't want to see seams.

It's partially a case of the old Henny Youngman bit "Doctor it hurts when I do this..." The doctor says, "Well, don't do that!"