Error Message: Close programs to prevent information loss - Photoshop Elements 14 Editor

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  • Updated 2 years ago
Every time I open PSE14 I get an error message from Microsoft Windows that says

Close programs to prevent information loss.  Your computer is low on memory.  Save your files and close these programs : Photoshop Elements 14 Editor. 

I have plenty of memory on my computer, have had several conversations with HP and my computer has also had several trips for repair because of this.  Both HP and the repair place cannot find a problem.  I never have this problem until I open PSE14 and it starts within a half hour of using it.

Anyone else experiencing this?  Is it Windows 10?
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Amber Taylor

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Posted 2 years ago

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Steve Lehman

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This has never happened with PSE in any version, but PSE craves lots of memory and when it doesn't get it, it will throw error messages.  As a network technician I might wager a guess it is the hardware.  One of the things a tech in a repair shop overlooks is the memory, as the modules become ajar easily.  Whenever memory is ajar, errors like this abound.  It's undetectable unless a tech watches the boot-up sequence on the screen where it gives a check-sum of numbers which spread across the screen.  The word "error" appears at the end of the string, as it flashes "inefficient memory" then gives you the option to reboot in safe mode.  If your HP computer has a graphic splash screen, its hiding the boot up and the memory numbers.  Those numbers come from the BIOS "POST" (self-open-system-test) which is the burned into a  program in the BIOS for checking your system at boot-up.  Your tech should have seen in the BIOS whether the system completed its POST.  If not, the hardware has a problem.  During boot up, the memory and the drives are tested to make sure the system is set to work.  Most techs won't think of pushing on a memory modules to get a good connection. Just an 1/8th of an inch of a wiggle can make a difference.  This is a hardware problem, not Windows and not PSE14.  Windows 10 manages memory efficiently. Have your tech look in the device manager.  You are looking for yellow exclamation points that will appear before a device.  In technical schools, our professors would loosen the memory to test students, keeping us in practice. Loose memory is one of those overlooked problems.  I think you have loose memory.   Windows 10 does not have limitation for memory.  If memory is limited, it's your hardware that has the problem.   
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Lukasz Jakubowski

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Hi,


I have observed increased memory usage in PSE14 when in detected faces on photos in Organizer. Memory usage was growing without limits, consuming my 16 GB, and then PSE 14 crashed due to lack of memory. The solution was just to wait until PSE processed all the photos (all face detection operations done before crashing were preserved), restarting it between crashes.

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Steve Lehman

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Question:  How many face photos were you processing at once?   16 gigs is a lot of memory to consume.  For example, AOL is known to consume memory but never peaks unless processing 10 or more emails at once.  
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Lukasz Jakubowski

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I could process approx 8000 photos (most with faces) in one go before memory was full (obviously, they are rather processed sequentially). Might be also memory leak in face processing library by Cognitec, not in Adobe code.
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Steve Lehman

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That's a lot of faces all at once.  That can fill lots of memory.  

But, when you use two programs for the same task although they are used in separately but in unison, this makes for double trouble as one will compete for memory against the other.  If they share the same code they may crash each others system.  Example, Adobe PSE completes with Organizer but not as much.  

You've probably heard of this with virus scanners which compete when they have the same code.  I am thinking this could be looked at, but I still think your hardware should be looked at first.  

As a tech, our priority is the hardware as we first look at cables and connections as a habit, as we've been trained to do. We go through a series of checks to be safe.  Checking the memory is one of those priorities.  In the same way the POST checks hardware first then checks the software we do the same.  And all techs are trained like this.  Not sure if you read about the POST but this is the burned-in code in the BIOS that checks your system during its boot.  It checks the hardware first by checking the drives to find a disc in any of them as it checks the D drive first then the C with the hard drive.  If it finds a disc it stops (at the hard drive).  After checking the memory and other hardware, its handshakes between the BIOS and Open Systems which is exact heart of Windows.  Open Systems is a 7 layer communications protocol stack.  Then it goes to the system.ini to initialize Windows, then to the io.sys to load drivers, then to the config.sys to paint your screen like you want, then the win.ini where the Windows graphic pops up on the screen.  It would boot even if it had a memory problem, although the video wouldn't be complete as it would have an archaic video in safe mode. If it has a hardware problem, safe mode is where it goes but not always if the memory is only afar.  

If your software is messing up, I would check the memory first, then check the device manager to see if anything else is not connected incorrectly.  A video card can act the same way, and that would show in the Device Manager.

After that, I would check the software by running one at a time to see if one brings an error message, then I would load the other to see if it conflicts with the other.  
In a shop environment, a tech will unload your entire programs in the Startup folder, then reboot, as each will start one at a time.  A tech will see error messages after a program is loaded. After the startup, your computer will continue to boot up but error messages will keep showing after the Windows graphic.  Also, the Startup will show if two programs share the same type of files, on its programming lines.  

Still, after all of this, I would bet a dollar, its the hardware. So, let's check your Device Manager.  In Windows 10, go to your Windows icon at the lower left of the screen.  Click settings.  In settings click Devices.  At the very bottom of that screen in blue hypertext is link that opens the Device Manager.  Check if there are any yellow exclamation point icons next to any items listed.  They would show as a tiny yellow triangle.  You won't need to do anything else to see them. If those show there, depending upon the device, there still won't be a problem, as most of the time its really the device driver.  The device Manager does not relate to software other than device drivers. Do this and report back.      
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Lukasz Jakubowski

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Hi,

OP's computer has been checked multiple times hardware-wise, so I don't think they could have missed corrupted memory problem. (And mine RAM is OK as well.)

In my case symptoms are consisent with software memory leak. Franky, I have not heard about damaged RAM giving such symptoms.

Faces are not processed at once. It is like saying, that if 10.000 cars passed section of a road in a day, they did it all at once.

As for what happens on system statup and how shared code affects applications, I would advice anyone to google it themselves - there are inaccuracies in your description.


(Edited)