Enable one colour profile for all files opening

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I was opening a bunch of old JPEGs today to resize, in this type of instance it would be really handy to have an Apply to all checkbox so I can assign Adobe RGB to all of the files! Also as mentioned elsewhere a preview of how the profile will change the file would help!
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Glenbo

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Posted 1 year ago

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eartho

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There are many, many ways to do this already. You can run a batch on the files. You can use the Image Processor Pro plugin. You can set aRGB to the default profile and have Ps convert on open... etc, etc.
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Glenbo

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My issue with these approaches are that they either take a bit of planning or they require a fixed colour profile set up, I'm interested in the incident where you have an unplanned workflow and need to just open a bunch of files quickly without a load of alerts to click!
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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You mention wanting to "Assign" Adobe RGB Profile to a bunch of old JPEGs. That makes no sense at all!
http://colormanagementinfo.com/Articles/Assign-vs-Convert/

If what you mean is "I want to "Convert" a bunch of old JPEGs to Adobe RGB then as eartho suggested Image Processor Pro is  a great tool for this purpose. This is especially true if you also want to resize the images to the same dimensions.

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ken.barber

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What Todd Shaner said.  If the JPEGs were saved in the Adobe RGB profile, they should have already been tagged as such, and would open in it.

If they were not, then you need to CONVERT them, not "assign" a different profile, which will screw up the colors.

But in the end, it makes NO sense to convert an sRGB image to Adobe RGB, or any other wider-gamut profile:  all data outside of the sRGB gamut has been discarded from the image (if it was ever there) and you'll still have an image with an sRGB gamut.

Further, JPEG is an OUTPUT format.  Images saved in .jpg are not meant to be manipulated; only displayed.
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Glenbo

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I understand what you are saying, but take the JPEG format up with every camera manufacturer in the world who use JPEG? I normally use Camera Raw, but when I have a bunch of  JPEGs I get stuck clicking convert to Adobe RGB, will never use sRGB Microsofts mutilated idea of a colour space it's only supported by Adobe so they can put the Windows logo on their software!
The JPEGs often come in as untagged to a Colour Profile, so it would make life much more convenient in these cases to be able to convert/assign all at once, but Super Image Processor is a much better workaround!
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ken.barber

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Serious photographers do not use cameras that only record in JPEG.
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Glenbo

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That doesn't mean they are immune to this problem, there are going to be instances where all users are up against time and have a bunch of JPEGs without profiles to open, I only suggested this as a time saver seeing as Adobe have moved to the SAAS model for their software, if it is now a service instead of a boxed product, then they should cater for all! I'm interested in saving time, I loathe applications and websites that have too many buttons to click!
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ken.barber

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If you have a bunch of JPEGs to which you wish to assign a profile, the proper tool for the job is exiftool, not an Adobe product.
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Cristen Gillespie

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> I understand what you are saying, but take the JPEG format up with every camera manufacturer in the world who use JPEG? I normally use Camera Raw, but when I have a bunch of  JPEGs I get stuck clicking convert to Adobe RGB>

Glenbo, can you batch process through Camera Raw? I shoot Raw + JPEG, plus I receive iPhone JPEGs all the time, and I open first in Camera Raw, then I can either do something there, or not. . . since my CR workspace can be set to Adobe RGB, I can  just select all to open in Photoshop and they open with the Adobe RGB profile.

As others have said, there are many ways, and I agree clicking one at a time is a nuisance when you want to open several that way. But I wouldn't count on anything changing soon enough for me, if I were you, so perhaps in the meantime, this will work more smoothly? You at least know before you open them that you are about to open them. . .
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Glenbo

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I agree mostly with what everyone is saying, but here's the rub, colour profiling is beyond most peoples grasp, I often troubleshoot for people and explaining how to handle this, will be beyond most people! The whole profiling system is flawed, deciding a workflow (setting Photoshop to open and convert all RGB files to your preferred profile) is a crazy system if you have no control over the final CMYK output! I do a lot of publishing work and to date, I have never yet come across a UK publisher that actually has a profiled workflow, and yet the number one issue I often get asked about is how to fix over inking, the Fogra 39 profile doesn't do the job, it often allows over inking, yet it is the profile supplied as the preferred profile! in terms of RGB the Adobe colour space is by far the better profile, sRGB doesn't cut it at all! when I explain all this to a client and that they need o click convert or don't convert, the number one answer is "why can't I click convert all!?" so to end I wish I'd never brought this up here! It's a problem, that doesn't have an answer ultimately, as unless there is a profiled workflow it's pointless! I stress this is an issue I have come across in UK Publishing, I have argued till I am blue in the face with production controllers that I need a profile from their printers to control colour, but the only answer I get is "use Fogra 39" which as stated before, doesn't cut it.
The best information I have found on this prickly subject is the excellent CMYK 2 (http://www.amazon.co.uk/CMYK-2-0-Cooperative-Photographers-Designers-ebook/dp/B003E6ICAW/
I came at this issue from the point of view of there should be a quicker way of opening a bunch of JPEGs you have been supplied with to maybe print out for someone, than opening 100 JPEGs and letting your coffee go cold while you sit there clicking convert or don't convert for all 100 of them, unless you know and understand how to use either Image Processor or Image Processor Pro, easy enough for me, as I know how to use them, and the power they offer! For most though, it's simply an irritation, (yes I know if they had a profiled workflow it needn't be, but try explaining this to a publisher, whose FD still doesn't understand why you need more fonts than Helvetica & Times!)
This problem reminds me of the old joke how many directors does it take to screw in a lightbulb!
Even worse this issue extends into programs like elements, where I doubt anyone even cares about a profile, it's a flawed badly implemented idea and it's compounded as a bad idea by the standard install of CC using sRGB (YUCK) & US SWOP Coated (not suitable for European workflows, simply there to use a Works with Windows logo)
The author of the book I mention went to a lot of trouble to learn what he thought he needed to know to control colour, but on reading his book, I felt his frustration of trying to make a square peg fit in a round hole!
I'll shut up now about this, I just wanted to explain my position on this...
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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As per the description in your posts I believe we are talking about two (2) separate but related issues:

1) How to batch assign the "correct" color profile to untagged image files.

This requires the ability to first preview the image files with various color profiles to determine the most likely working color space used to create the image files. Then batch "assign" the presumed correct color profile using a tool like EXIFTool suggested by ken.barber. Unfortunately the current version of EXIFTool GUI does not support this capability and requires using EXIFTool Command Line execution. This makes the task more difficult for many users. I've made the older version of EXIFTool and the GUI files available at the below link, which allows "loss-less" color profile assignment.

https://forums.adobe.com/message/6029359#6029359

...and here's how to use it:

https://forums.adobe.com/message/6028871#6028871

2) How to batch convert image files that are already tagged with a color profile.
That's easy–As already mentioned use Image Processor Pro.
(Edited)
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Cristen Gillespie

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> I agree mostly with what everyone is saying, but here's the rub, colour profiling is beyond most peoples grasp,>

I understand better where you're coming from. You deal with the client to press pipeline, and yes, a lot of people have no clue what profiling does.

I'm not sure that your answer (let them check Convert All) is going to make the end result any better than giving them an action to run when they select the images. If they're going to CMYK, there is some dispute about which RGB working space is "best." In fact, none is going to be wonderful, because CMYK can print color neither sRGB nor ARGB can handle, and can't print color that these profiles display easily. They're  different turkeys.  It's part of why we have prepress professionals, although a lot of people simply want cheap results over all else—not all jobs qualify for the best.

However, the fact that learning what they're doing is irritating, and most often simply ignored, when they're supposed to be doing this professionally is, imo, not much of an excuse. But if they absolutely refuse to learn even basic concepts about profiles, AND they absolutely must convert all their sRGB images to ARGB before later converting to CMYK, then why not simply have them run a batch action? Surely they can learn that much—use IP or IP Pro, or push Photoshop to improve that awful Batch Action dialog so it's intelligible, or drag and drop on a droplet? I don't quite understand why Adobe should circumvent its own safeguards for working with profiles to accommodate those who simply don't want to attempt to understand what they're doing, when they can batch convert easily enough.

I'm not saying the Color Settings dialog can't be revisited and quite possibly improved upon, maybe even to the extent of letting someone pick a profile and insist it always gets applied to incoming images, and damn the consequences, but willful ignorance (I don't care about results, I just want it to be easy) can never be improved upon, so why are we trying to accommodate it?

Yes, you kind of opened a can of worms here. Color management is still indeed that.<G>
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Glenbo

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You're right, and the only to provide a solution that they would follow is the action as a droplet, invariably IT put a stop on installing anything extra, in one location they even removed the standard Image Processor! 
Colour Profiling is a can of worms, stacked like Russian Dolls with more worms!
I think the next time I'm asked I may refer them to this post lol!
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ken.barber

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"colour profiling is beyond most peoples grasp"

Uh, yeah.  Including anyone who confuses color PROFILING with color MANAGEMENT.

To recap:

1.  sRGB has a smaller gamut than Adobe RGB.  Converting a smaller-gamut image to a larger-gamut one does nothing.  All of the out-of-gamut information has already been thrown away:  you'll still have an image that is entirely within the sRGB gamut.

The only reason I can think of for doing this is if you're sending images to Alamy, who wants images in the Adobe RGB colorspace.  I don't remember off the top of my head whether that's a requirement though.

2.  The sRGB standard was a joint venture between HP and Microsoft.  It isn't exclusively Microsoft's.  
It was developed from the known capabilities of U.S. color TVs that existed at the time, and made sense for that time.  It was never intended to be a professional standard -- just one that was "good enough for farm work" as the saying goes.

3.  NO photog should EVER use CMYK.  That's a profile for printing press people, and only they know how to use it.  If you have to convert to it for the print shop you're using, change print shops because they don't know what they're doing.

4.  This thread begins with, "I was opening a bunch of old JPEGs today to resize..."  Never resize a JPEG, unless you're downsizing.
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Cristen Gillespie

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> NO photog should EVER use CMYK.  That's a profile for printing press people, and only they know how to use it. >

I don't know if photographers should or not, but designers sending anything to press better know a whole lot about it, no matter who in their food chain does the converting. 

> This thread begins with, "I was opening a bunch of old JPEGs today to resize..."  Never resize a JPEG, unless you're downsizing.>

Best practices are just that—best. They don't encompass the entirety of our worlds.  The rules for using profiles, taking into consideration a file's destination, are not engraved in stone, and neither are the rules for resizing images. Read Margulis' Professional Photoshop starting with early editions and coming forward to today if you want to know something about how professional prepress has changed, and how few rules are immutable even today.  Like most things about image editing: "It all depends."
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Glenbo

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Points answered:
1. You assume too much, there is a reason for Adobe RGB it's a better starting point for a designer to work in given the larger colour space. If the system is profiled, then turning on CMYK Preview will show the limited CMYK space but if for instance, a sky needs extending, sRGB is the wrong choice as the blues (and greens) suck! Designers rarely leave an image as it is, so again Adobe RGB makes more sense!
2. This just proves the point that sRGB is not a good standard as TV monitors do not hold a wide gamut of colours.
3. Read CMYK 2 and you will realise you are wrong, this photographer realised that if he wanted his photos to print well he needed to get involved.
4. Of course, I was down sizing, yet as a Designer, I often have to upsample from the picture that just has to be used, taken by the MDs niece on her iPhone!
If I had my way JPEGs would be banned, a lossy file format for photographers just shows the history of the internet, if small file sizes are needed PNG is better, but I always use TIFF or PSD

This post is moving off topic, all I wanted was a way of assigning/converting to one profile quicker than clicking every dialogue, or changing a colour setup, for reasons we have already discussed, it's a bad idea to change that if it has been set up professionally. So I see validity in my suggestion!
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Cristen Gillespie

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> If I had my way JPEGs would be banned, >

Awww, I hate it too, but when quality doesn't count. . . LOL
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Glenbo

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I think everyone can stop commenting on this now, it's pretty clear no-one agrees, this will be my last reply on this topic!
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ken.barber

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"there is a reason for Adobe RGB it's a better starting point"

Agreed.  It's a better STARTING POINT.  Once an image has been reduced to sRGB, you'll never get back the colors you lost.  You might as well try to convert a grayscale image to RGB:  it will be CODED as an RGB, but you'll never get those colors back.
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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I totally agree with Glenbo's 'Points Answered' and reasoning for the original request here.

To answer ken.barber. What you are saying is correct concerning the image file's "capture" gamut. But when editing the smaller gamut sRGB image file in a larger gamut color space like Adobe RGB we CAN get back colors that exceed the original sRGB file's gamut. Since most CMYK color profiles have significant gamut outside the sRGB color space it makes sense to "convert" the sRGB original file to a larger color space like Adobe RGB to allow applying CMYK soft proof corrections that recover gamut. As you can see below there is significant CMYK color gamut in the Blue/Green color area that is clipped by the sRGB color space. This is easily corrected by applying edits in the wider Adobe RGB working color space.

This is of course all for naught if you're using a standard sRGB gamut display. A properly calibrated display with near 100% Adobe RGB gamut is required to perform "accurate" CMYK soft proof editing for print processing.

Peace

sRGB 3D Gamut (Solid) vs CoatedFOGRA39 CMYK Gamut (Wire-Frame)