Elements: Reads the incorrect time after using GeoSetter

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When I add/change a location using Geosetter the time taken which elements reads is often (not always) 3/4 hours ahead (windows explorer still has the correct time taken). I am guessing this is to do with time zone as I live in the Dubai but after tweaking multiple settings I cant seem to stop this problem. It even happens when i have been back to the UK.

Any one have any thoughts?

Thank you in advance
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Robert Ashby

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Posted 2 weeks ago

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Steve Lehman

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Adobe sets a date and time according to your computer's date and time.  Reset your computer's clock as you travel or download an app that adjust several time zones.  This one is easy to understand.   See ya.   
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Robert Ashby

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Thanks very much for the reply Steve. I am still not 100% sure why this would be the problem as my computer sits at home and is linked to the local time zone. Are you saying I should i be changing the computers time zone to match that of the photos when saving them in Geosetter?

Thanks again
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Steve Lehman

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Understand where your computer is getting the date and time to stamp onto your files. Is it from your computer or is it magic?  A computer is a recorder that plays back whatever you have in it. If the time is not there it won't stamp the time. If the time it has recorded is ticking off at your regular home-time, then that's the time you get.   Unless you change the clock to another zone-time, or have time zones auto-adjustments, it won't have the correct time where you go.  Also changing the clock too many times could possibly lead to a crash. 

You see, your BIOS gets it's boot-up time from the CMOS which is your computer's calendar and time-clock.   If you change the time in the CMOS too many times, the BIOS will get its boot-time from the CMOS okay but the CMOS may have a problem with the time changes.  It doesn't have a required many times it can change, or when it can be changed, but look at this scenario:

if you had a crash and you utilized the restore feature to restore back to a day ago, when was that?   Before you changed your clock that may have been just an hour ago from your previous time or a day ahead.  Did you forget to change the clock?  What now?  So your restore feature may not work which will lead to a crash, because it's only days to give you to reboot your computer after a crash will be an hour ago, 6 hours ago, or one day ago depending upon what hour your CMOS has now.  But don't forget one other thing:  The boot-up after a crash is the "last known good boot-up".  The last boot-up may have been one hour ago or one hour ahead depending how you changed the CMOS clock.   

Also the BIOS will have a problem with the many times you change the CMOS clock.  You see, the BIOS stamps a date and time per each boot-up.   If you are trying to reboot after a crash to an hour ahead it will permanently crash.  YOU need to leave your CMOS clock alone.   

That's why there are apps that can give you different time-zones across the globe without changing your computer clock.  BTW, the clock time in the lower-right corner is from your CMOS.   

My best suggestion is, don't rely on your computer for time-stamps on files.   Input your file dates (and times) manually and have a watch that has multi-time-zones or an app on your phone or an app on your computer for that.  I think Seiko has that feature or Citizen and some of the watches I buy, may be expensive but they work well.   Actually the last time I bought a Seiko was in Tokyo for $20.00.   I do not know or have a time-zone watch now.  I did have a Pulsar that had that feature in the 1990's.  Even having two time zones can help.   
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Robert Ashby

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Thanks for attempting to explain this Steve but to be completely honest I am still a little lost.

I have just done some more tests and Geosetter, windows explorer and elements all have the correct time taken when I import photos.

If I then change/add a location (change of location will be within the same country) on Geosetter and save it in Geosetter, Geosetter and windows explorer register the correct time taken, however, elements now reads a different time.

I set the correct time on my cameras in each country so I really only need/want elements to read the date taken.

Do i still need an external app to do this rather than just change some settings in Geosetter?

Thanks again 
(Edited)
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Robert Ashby

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So after some more tests I think I am starting to follow now. Importing onto my computer causes the files to all be stamped with UTC +4 regardless of whether this is true or not. So when Geosetter changes the time zone and does not change the time taken this messes everything up as Elements now reads the time as 3 hours earlier.

So is there a recommended app to use for time on windows 7 that I can rely on to import with the correct information which will then be read correctly by Elements?

Thanks

(Although this is now starting to feel like a GeoSetter bug and i am not sure why more people do not have the same issues as myself)
(Edited)
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Steve Lehman

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Robert Ashby, 

Again I will need to reiterate, changing your clock on your computer will help with time on Photoshop but pick a time and leave it there.  Don't keep changing it.  Your computer will have a problem.  

As for time zones, none of the downloadable time zone apps will integrate with Photoshop.  Equally as frustrating, reprogramming the clock for Photoshop can happen but it will still coincide with the clock on your computer as nothing will be gained, and it will be quite complex.  Again I say, you will need to input your time to your files.  There is a work-around, but I'm not satisfied that it will work. 

A workaround for this will be your camera - when it takes a photo it time-stamps the photo, and once you import those, there should be a time on those photo files.  I'm not sure if your Photoshop will pick it up.  You could give it a try, but from the bloggers say, there is no guarantee of this, as Photoshop may still take its time stamp from the computer clock or you will need to input it.   

Frankly, I don't know why you would want your photo files to have confusing times according to zones.  It will only make everything confusing and separating them into different folders or files will only complicate everything further.  I am a multi-task guy and even I wouldn't make my tasks more complex unless I have lots of time on my hands.  Since you travel a lot, I'd lighten your brain-load to make your day less complex.   In our country we have an old saying - KISS:  "keep it simple stupid" (disregard the stupid part, it only completes the extra S).  

I found 3 different time zone applications (below) to download which will keep you on time, and you can use them for inputting the time.   None of them integrate with Photoshop.  One is for Android.  19 others are for various computer brands but 19 to chose from.  One is a Microsoft clock if you have Windows.   Have fun with these.  It'll keep you on time.   

Likewise, having two watches could do the same.  My father had two or three watches on his arms and they worked for him in the days without computers while he was everywhere, State-side.  My wife and I are American-Canadian, mostly traveling in Pacific time, whether we are in Seattle or Vancouver.  Sometimes we go East and when we do, we set hers to another time and keep my watch in Seattle time.  There are lots of ways to do this.  Give your brain a break, keep them on your arm!   Make it simple.   

World Clock

https://www.timeanddate.com/android/worldclock/

Microsoft time zone clock

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/p/world-clock-time-zones/9wzdncrfjck2#activetab=pivot:overviewtab

19 tools for time zones for various computers

http://blog.idonethis.com/tools-for-managing-time-zone-differences/




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Robert Ashby

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Ha, indeed keeping it simple is what I would like to do.

I am not bothered what time zone the photos are labelled as, I just want Elements to read the actual time taken on the photo (which it doesn't do) or for GeoSetter not change the time zone on the photo when I add a location (which it doesn't seem able to not do).

The whole way time zones seem to operate is just odd and unnecessary to me as you say. I set the correct time taken on my photos in the camera so why different programs can't just read it I don't know...

Thanks again for all the help
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Steve Lehman

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Photoshop doesn't read the time on your photos because your Photoshop does not have a clock nor does it reach out to the CMOS to fetch the time.  Again, input your label.  I do.  Also if you are utilizing the catalog, I never do anything with that because frankly, it's always buggy.   So I cannot help you with that.