Photoshop: PNG files take ridiculously too long to save.

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  • Problem
  • Updated 2 years ago
  • (Edited)
PSD files can take as long as 5 minutes to save as a PNG. This problem needs to be addressed in an update for cs5 (not cs6).
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Ellen Schwartz

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  • frustrated beyond words!

Posted 8 years ago

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PECourtejoie, Champion

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Ellen, is it for Photoshop.com or photoshop cs?
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Ellen Schwartz

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Photoshop cs. I went to the Adobe site to leave feedback, and I was directed to here. My apologies if this is the wrong place to post my feedback for Adobe.
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PECourtejoie, Champion

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No worries, Ellen, I was confused by the software you selected under "products and Services". I will correct that for you.

Can we have more info about the files: are they large, multi-layer ones, 16 bits? Is there a message displayed? what are the settings you selected under PNG.
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Chris Cox

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Official Response
PNG uses ZIP/Flate compression. That compression method can be very slow, depending on the data in the image being compressed.

This is the tradeoff you get for using PNG to get good compression: it takes longer to save.

This is not a bug, and not something that can be addressed in a dot release.
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Franck Payen

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Hi Chris, sorry to reopen this 6 years later, but I just had a client use case that I had no idea of and thought it would be interesting to share : 
He is partly a packaging photographer, shoots his raws, develops in Lightroom, edits and cutouts made in Photoshop.
When he has to send to the client he sends them pngs :
- Most of them don't have Photoshop
- Most of them don't know how to handle another file type
- It keeps transparency
- It keeps the color profile
- Clients doesn't see the layers and "internal cooking"
- They can use it instantly on any support, incl. powerpoint and web.

He also mentioned this was common practice, which I had no idea before. It makes sense but was surprising.

The thing is, the slower compressed files takes waaaaaay more time to save, and we are talking about 100 MB psd file, 70MB PNG "fast but heavy" and 35 MB PNG "smaller but slower" (those are almost instant). That starts to make a lot of disk space + online transfer time.

35MB slow can take up to 40s to save, while 70MB fast takes less than a second...

Since we're far from your Dot Release timeframe from 6 years ago, do you think this case can get a second chance ?