Disable parts of Photoshop not needed?

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Photoshop is without doubt a massive and extremely powerful program that serves many types of users in lots of different ways. I, like lots of other photographers, only use a minute part and I wondered if there’s a way of disabling large chunks which are never ever going to be used, to allow for a faster and smoother workflow? Personally, I use ACR, open in to Photoshop, recheck my contrast and exposure and sometimes cropping and maybe Content Aware Fill then I run one of 4-5 export Actions. That is it!

So as you can see, I don’t use 99.998% of Photoshop but guess there’s a lot of brain power under the hood that is still churning away which is slowing down my computer?

It would be a great idea (IMHO) if parts of Photoshop could be disabled to help increase performance?
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Jon Hobley

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Posted 3 months ago

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Jaroslav Bereza

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Some parts of Photoshop are like plugins files or extensions. Yes, you can remove some of them and it should be a little bit faster. So maybe you could cut-off 5-10% from current functions. It should affect time to open Photoshop.

You can also customize menu and hide items you don't need.

Adobe sometimes removes features like Device Preview, Color variations, Design space, Settings synchronization ...but people almost always complain. 
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Max Johnson, Champion

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Not to dismiss the feature request, but it sounds like the things you are doing would be massively more efficient if done with Lightroom instead. I use Lightroom for import/export, color correction, cropping, all with multiple saved user-presets for exporting. There's also the ability to make virtual copies of a single file with different crops and color treatments so you don't get 5 copies of the same file on disk. 
Now, I only go to photoshop when I need to manipulate the image, like remove a fire hydrant or retouch hair.
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Jon Hobley

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Hi Max, I’ve had it with Lightroom. It’s way too slow! I used to love it and knew it inside out. Now, I dread having to use it. ACR and Ps are a lot faster. I do love lightroom Export, it’s the best around.

For my football getting images in to Lr is just way too slow.
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Max Johnson, Champion

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Fair point. LR with 20mp dng on a 4k screen lumbers along like an exhausted rhinoceros. 
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eartho

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Why not CaptureOne then?

Disabling parts of PS would do nothing to increase performance.
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David, Official Rep

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Howdy Jon,

There have been application built around the model you're suggesting, where the app is made up of a number of modules that are not all required.  Unfortunately, that model largely fell out of favor in the late 1990s / early 2000s, in part because of maintenance -- "so, of the 23 modules possible, which constellation are you using, customer...?"

Within PS code paths you don't use don't really slow you down.  You do know that you can hide commands, right?  Check out Edit > Menus to remove items.

Hope that helps,
David
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Jaroslav Bereza

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I think it slows down Photoshop startup time and requires a bit more memory. C++ plugins are loaded on Photoshop start. Photoshop reads 1000 characters of each script file and seeks special comments. These comments and plugins may have definition in which case should be allowed in menu... CEP Extensions starts new Chromium instances for each panel, sometimes also node.js process. So I suggest to turn off new Start screen and also use legacy new file dialog. If you open CEP extension, Photoshop reads all bytes of all files and makes checksum to verify digital signup of code to verify extension authenticity. 
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eartho

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Ps startup time is the fastest it's even been. I'm using an 8 year old MacPro and it's up in less than 4 seconds. Let's say they optimize the shit out of the startup and get it down to 2 seconds... how does that help anyone in the grand scheme of things? Do you spend a lot of your waking hours restarting Ps? If you had to do that 100x a day, that would still be only 6 minutes out of a 10 hour work day...
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Jaroslav Bereza

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I am currently learning myself Deco Framework and I am debugging deco script in ESTK a Photoshop crashes every time when script stopped or has error. I see main window after 11 seconds and it is usable after 22 seconds.

But my whole comment is not about start time.