PHOTOSHOP - Different preview colors in Adobe apps and some web browsers

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  • Updated 3 years ago
  • (Edited)
I'm adding this image that shows the preview of the same exact file under:

photoshop;
Bridge;
windows 7 panel;
Chrome, Firefox browser;

The image is a jpg saved w/ embed color profile (sRGB IEC61966-2.1)
But the preview on Adobe apps (in this case) is a clear orange.
When goes to the web, it is no more that orange.

Photoshop has the ability to choose different previews (cmyk, web rgb, etc).
But the one that renders color to "Internet Standerd RGB" doesn't simulate what we see on the browsers.

The same should happen with Bridge (at least one should be able to activate that kind of color preview)

If my team have a quality color control on our production, this lack of preview on Bridge provoques wrong color evaluations with wrong color corrections on the team.

If an image has been processed and has an embed color profile, it should work the same on Adobe apps and windows and browsers.

Note:
all my team are using iProfiler regulary on all monitors to calibrate colors.
All computers are using Photoshop CC2014 v2.2 and Bridge CC

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Pedro Marques

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Posted 3 years ago

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Chris Cox

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Different browsers handle color management differently. Despite W3C standards, there is little agreement among browser developers on how to handle color.

Photoshop and Bridge should be very close to correct, assuming that your display profile is correct. But by default they are showing you the color in your document, not a preview of what browsers will do.
Some browsers will apply color management the same as Photoshop does (convert document profile to display profile), some will assume that all documents are sRGB (ignore the document profile) and convert to the display profile, and some still ignore the document and display profile and copy the values directly to the display (so you never know what color you will get, and appearance will be very monitor dependent - which is what it looks like your browsers are doing).
Photoshop allows you to preview all 3 possible browser cases -- but you have to know how each browser handles color and check all 3 possible cases.

You may want to read up a bit on color management in applications, and how color management is still broken/inconsistent between various web browsers.
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Pedro Marques

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Thanks for the answer.

Two facts persist:

1. all the browsers tested and mobile devices are coherent with the same color (tiny and irrelevant differences).

2. only Bridge and Photoshop has different color previews that forces us to have all the images tested in a browser.
With CC and the ability to have html5 within apps, why shouldn't this work using adobe apps?

I know ICC consortium has partially solved thus making everyone to use sRGB IEC61966-2.1, but at least having the ability to preview it on Adobe apps should be that base from where we could improve to other levels.
ICC has already planned another ICC generation, smarter. But it will take ages for the market to integrate it.
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Chris Cox

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1) I also test the browsers, and know that they are not consistent. Other people test the browsers, and publish results showing that they are not consistent in their implementation of color management.

2) Photoshop could show you the same thing as your browser, once you understand what your browser is doing (or not doing) to your color values. Photoshop by default will show you exactly the color in your document - even if the browser mishandles your colors. Photoshop is the most accurate preview of your document, with Bridge second, and browsers all over the map with regard to color accuracy.

Your understanding of ICC and sRGB are very, very wrong. The ICC does not set web standards. sRGB is a standard from outside the ICC, but can be represented in an ICC profile (as can most other colorspaces). "making everyone use sRGB" is not a solution, nor specified by anyone.

The W3C (web standards group) said that web color should be sRGB if the profile is unknown, or use the profile in the document.

And you can already preview what your web browser will show in Adobe applications - but you don't yet understand what your browser is doing, so you don't know how to set Photoshop to preview what your browser does.

You still should do more reading on color management, and how various browsers handle (or mishandle) color management.
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Pedro Marques

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I totally agree with you.

My problem is that all your efforts and ours at the end have to be judge by the consumer that is seeing the color wherever device he uses.
If we analyse this from their point of view, the 'millenials' point-of-view, he doesn't care about color management, but only about getting at home the product with the same color he saw on screen.

The preview I mentioned before to be eventually enabled as an option, could be represented for example by iPhone6 preview, iPad preview, etc.

Finally, I'm attaching the image I tested before:

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Chris Cox

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In browsers, you will rarely get the same color among them.
Photoshop can show you all the things that browsers might show - but you have to learn a little bit about what the browsers do (or don't do). By default, Photoshop is going to show you as accurate a preview as possible of the colors in your document. But you have to understand that most browsers will not be showing you an accurate preview, and will be mangling your color in different ways depending on the browser and display.

Previews for portable devices are even more tricky, because their color rendition changes with different batches of displays.