Colour space in Lightroom - "wide gamut myth"

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  • Updated 3 years ago
This isn't something I have noticed but a friend of mine sent me the link below to explain why he had stopped using Lightroom, not a decision he would take lightly. 

http://www.damiensymonds.net/2014/06/the-wide-gamut-myth.html

The article is from 2014, so quite old as these things go - so is the point made out of date, inaccurate (if so, why) or on the money (again, why). 
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Paul Parkinson

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  • puzzled - unsure

Posted 3 years ago

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Paul Plak

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I'd say the point is still valid. I tend to stay in the sRGB color space all the time, and this protects against painful surprises when you do the final output to sRGB and see different colors on the web than on your screen inside Photoshop or LR.

But I'm not a pro and I'll probably never need a vaster color space.
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Rikk Flohr, Official Rep

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Some reading material for you on a previous discussion of this article: http://forum.luminous-landscape.com/i...
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JaapV

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I would also suggest readers now panicking at the thought of being labeled "Craparazzi" to read that "article" all the way to the end (!) and to take note of its date and of the Lr versions mentioned therein. In any event, it's total crap.

As to "why" and "why not": sorry for not taking the time to provide instant gratification. The www has plenty of answers, as demonstrated by Rikk.
(Edited)
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Paul Plak

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Well it all depends on your needs and your workflow. As long as you don't need to go the extra mile, working within sRGB makes some steps easier.
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JaapV

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Sure, can't fault you for that. But to draw the conclusion that Lr is poisonous seems a little paranoid to me.
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Paul Plak

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Well I'm still using LR on a daily base and nobody has died. ;-)
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Cristen Gillespie

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There are other ways to treat your files so the hard effort you put into post isn't lost because of an early decision that you'd never need better. You can work in a wider gamut on a large original.  In LR you can create a virtual copy and use Soft-Proof set to the desired profile to keep from being surprised, make adjustments for it as needed.

I don't use LR for output, but I do use Save For Web in Photoshop to generate a small sized image for web use. I shouldn't be terribly surprised by the conversion if I've used Soft Proof set to sRGB for the web, and I've still got a wider gamut saved aside for a very nice printer—or whatever happens in the future.

It's been my experience that I'm usually sorry if I save anything in a condition that isn't as flexible as I can possibly manage. The web is getting more color managed, so you might even want someday to show off a photo with more color than you'll get out of sRGB alone. It just doesn't have to be all or very little.
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Conrad Chavez

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The credibility of that blog post is going down every year, and even more so in the last year. Apple recently revamped most of their popular iMac line with DCI-P3 gamut displays, and on mobile devices, the Apple iPad Pro uses DCI-P3 and Samsung Galaxy/Galaxy Tab displays can use Adobe RGB. Both DCI-P3 and Adobe RGB are much larger than sRGB.

That's the beginning of a long-term trend where consumer displays are moving beyond sRGB to larger color gamuts, and not just one. As time goes by it will become less reliable to assume most displays are sRGB. The right way to handle these changes is through color management and profiles. Lightroom is already doing that correctly, so it's ready for the future.

On the other hand, what that blog post recommends is a workflow that might soon be as outdated as telling web designers to stick to the 216-color Web-safe palette.
(Edited)