Lightroom/Camera Raw: Colour Profiles for similar makes/models of camera limited to 14

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  • Updated 1 year ago
  • Not a Problem
  • (Edited)
The number of profiles in the Camera Calibration tab seems to be limited to 14. It does seem to recognise the camera make and model, Sony profiles appear when it is a Sony image. The same for Nikon. I have two Nikon D7100 bodies and have profiled both cameras but LR cannot distinguish the serial numbers of the camera taking the image.

So I have 14 profiles for camera body number 1 and that precludes any profiles from camera body number 2 from appearing in the list. While I imagine the differences may be slight, if I want to profile the second body I can't apply those corrections to the image.

LR must be able to read the serial number or increase the number of profiles so that I can distinguish the different bodies in the profile name.
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Rick

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Posted 1 year ago

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Andrew Rodney

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I didn't know there was a limit. That said, you only need a handful of such Camera profiles based on the illuminant! One for Daylight (all daylight) one for Tungsten or better, one dual illuminant. One for Fluorescent and then any other odd and differing illuminant. 

Everything you thought you wanted to know about DNG camera profiles:

All about In this 30 minute video, we’ll look into the creation and use of DNG camera profiles in three raw converters. The video covers:


What are DNG camera profiles, how do they differ from ICC camera profiles.

Misconceptions about DNG camera profiles.

Just when, and why do you need to build custom DNG camera profiles?

How to build custom DNG camera profiles using the X-rite Passport software.

The role of various illuminants on camera sensors and DNG camera profiles.

Dual Illuminant DNG camera profiles.

Examples of usage of DNG camera profiles in Lightroom, ACR, and Iridient Developer.


Low Rez (YouTube):

http://youtu.be/_fikTm8XIt4


High Rez (download):

http://www.digitaldog.net/files/DNG%20Camera%20profile%20video.mov

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Rick

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Hello Andrew

Thank you for the link to your video, it is well done and is a complete overview of DNG camera colour profiles. Anyone reading this thread should take the 30 minutes to watch your explanation, most questions will be answered. 

Of course, I have some questions.

I figured out that LR will adapt the profile list to reflect the choices of profiles created for the specific camera used in their creation. I came across this by accident since I am trying to create profiles for two cameras at the same time (Nikon and Sony). This solved one problem, wondering where the profiles disappeared to when I changed source images.

I have a colour vision deficiency and so I try my best to have a calibrated workflow starting with the camera. It was helpful to see that there was little difference between the profiles for your Canon until you went to tungsten. Camera manufacturers seem to have so many variations that can be selected (daylight, shade, cloudy, incandescent, fluorescent, tungsten, flash, K and so on). By creating a custom profile am I really only telling LR how my camera sensor reproduces colour based on a predictable target? That is why WB is handled in the basic tab after the camera calibration has been applied? This is also another great reason to shot RAW.

With my first Nikon D7100, I had three profiles for Daylight, Shade, and Fluorescent. I would import into LR using a preset that chose one of these settings. In your video, you showed that this could be set as a default and in the process showed that the serial number of the camera was read in the process. It seems that this is the only place that LR captures the serial number.

My first D7100 was stolen and I have replaced it with a second D7100. I assumed that it would be appropriate to profile this second camera but I also want to have the original profiles should I wish to go back to my library and make adjustments to historical images. This is where I discovered the 14 profile limitation. So why would LR recognise the serial number when making a specific profile the default but not when selecting the profiles to present for selection in the Camera Calibration tab?

I understand that I can use fewer profiles and I can name them for each of my two Nikons and continue to work with the correct profile for the correct camera. The profiles that ship with LR get pushed to the bottom and not all variants remain available to me. It occurs to me that if I am taking the time to create specific camera profiles, I don't need access to the ones that ship with LR. I thought that they actually reflected the correct profile for my cameras much like the lens corrections were created specifically for my lens/body combinations. If I created my own profiles, there is no reason to use the ones that ship with LR?

Thank you for your response to my post.   

 
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Andrew Rodney

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The settings  you refer to sound like white balance settings for JPEGs. DNG camera profiles are by design white balance agnostic; you need to still set WB on the raws with whatever DNG camera profile you build. And yes, you want to build a custom profile for each camera even of the same make and model to account for differences in each. You will not need to use those supplied by Adobe however, some attempt (key word, attempt) to mimic the JPEG renderings who's name match. 
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Andrew Rodney

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I see no such limit on this end (Mac OS). I've got 20 dcp profiles showing up in ACR. 
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Simon Chen, Principal Computer Scientist

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Camera Profiles matching are based on the camera make and model, the SN of the camera body is not used. You might consider renaming the profiles appropriately to help you identify which camera profiles to use.
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Rick

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Thank you, Simon, I'm doing that.