Photoshop, Lightroom, Camera Raw, Bridge: Consistent color readings tools

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It would be nice if the densitometer that is in Lightroom (reads 0-100%) we available on the Info palette in Photoshop. That said, it would be nice if ALL the different color model densitometers were available cross application in a way that makes sense. 

Hey, while we're at it, why don't we add a densitometer to Bridge as well so we don't have to open in PS of LR to see if something needs adjusting.
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Mark Gilvey

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Posted 2 months ago

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Andrew Rodney

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I believe you need to first understand what you're asking for to understand this isn't possible;

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Densi...
There is no densitometer, there are RGB encoded values.
(Edited)
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Mark Gilvey

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For lack of a better name, it is essentially densitometer readings. We're reading light values in pixels in this case. I don't know that there is and appropriate name for it so I used the word Densitometer since it seems the closest. Is there a better name for it? I suppose this is a little like the dpi vs poi argument but that being said, I hope I got the general idea across. Thank you for your clarification. 
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Andrew Rodney

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For lack of a better name, it is essentially densitometer readings.
It absolutely is not and once you read what density really is and how Densitometry works, you'll understand why you were corrected. ;-)
There's no need for a lack of a better name but there is for the understanding. 

This is nothing more than a scale, in this discussion of 0-100 of RGB encoded values which all differ based on the color space. Or 0-255 using a different scale:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RGB_color_model
Typically 256-cubed (8 bits in three color channels with values of 0–255)—although each color in the RGB24 CLUT table has only 8 bits representing 256 codes for each of the R, G, and B primaries combinatorial math theory says this means that any given color can be one of 16,777,216 possible colors. However, the advantage is that an indexed-color image file can be significantly smaller than it would be with only 8 bits per pixel for each primary. 

IF I make a document in Photoshop in sRGB and produce a value that's R45/G89/B98, there isn't a lick of 'light' being applied here. There are, RGB values in a fixed scale (using 8-bits per color) being specified. 

IF you want the Adobe engineers to take a good request seriously, it's useful to ask them using correct terminology. You are welcome for the clarification. 
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Andrew Rodney

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Agreed that the entire Adobe universe provide the same info palette readouts and use the Lab encoding found in LR which unlike PS isn't clipped to +/- 128.