Lightroom Classic: Color Label filter on folders doesn’t show subfolders

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  • Updated 8 months ago
  • (Edited)
In my workflow, under a single top-level folder I have created subfolders for each year and under those I create more subfolders in broad categories such as Nature, Places, People and Travel. Under each of those I create even more subfolders and so on, as required.

I added a Green Color Label to the 2019 folder to mark the current year. With the release of Lr Classic 9, I tried the folder filter on the Color Label->Green. Lr hides all other folders except 2019, as expected.

However, although I can see all my images under the 2019 folder (with Library->Show Photos in Subfolders checked), none of the subfolders are visible in the Folders panel. This is very disappointing for me as I expected to see and be able to select any subfolder belonging to the filtered folder.

I imagine for some users this isn't an issue, but for my workflow, the Color Label filter isn't very useful as it is and would like to see it show subfolders under the filtered folder if I choose.

Another odd behaviour that I observe is when I deselect the Color Label filter by selecting None, Lr opens every single folder and subfolder in the Folder Panel. If I then close Lr and relaunch, the folders return to the open/closed state that I had before enabling/disabling the Color Label filter on folders.

It all might be "as designed", but it is still very annoying.
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Anthony Blackett

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Posted 8 months ago

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Johan Elzenga, Champion

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If you only mark the parent '2019' folder green, and not its subfolders, then it seems logical to me that these subfolders will not show when you filter on a green label.
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Anthony Blackett

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Sorry Johan, but it doesn't seem logical to me at all, it just restricts choice. If I mark a parent folder with a Color Label (or a Favorite Folders for that matter), then Filter on that Color Label, I can see and access all images under that folder. If I don't want to see the subfolders, I could simply collapse the parent. I think I should have the choice without having to mark each subfolder with the Color Label. To my knowledge, there isn't a way to select all the subfolders and mark (unmark) them with a Color Label.

Further to selecting Filter->Color Labels to None expanding all folders and subfolders, if Filter->All is selected, then the folder expanded/collapsed state returns to only those I had expanded previously.

Tony

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Johan Elzenga, Champion

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So what would seem logical to you if you marked a folder with green and marked its subfolders in red? What would then be logical to you if you filter on green? To see red subfolders? Or in this case no subfolders or only unmarked subfolders?
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Anthony Blackett

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In any scenario, including the one with a subfolder marked with another Color Label, I would expect to be able to expand the parent folder, and see and expand/collapse all subfolders as I choose.

Currently in the scenario you describe, with a green labelled parent and red labelled subfolder, if I filter on green I see all the images under the green labelled parent, including images from the red labelled folder. If I right-click one of those images and choose Go to Folder in Library, the red labelled folder’s images will be shown despite the filter set to green. I see no reason why the folder structure under a filtered Color Labelled folder should not be visible in its entirety.

As it is now, for me it joins an ever growing list of useless features that the Adobe developers add with each update while ignoring very good ideas suggested in this forum and don’t fix serious bugs that plague Lr Classic.

I’ve been using Lightroom since Version 1.0 was first released in May 2007 and it remains my choice for raw image editing, but I would very much like to see some real innovation return to the development of Lr Classic rather than the fluffing around the edges that we are getting.

Tony

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john beardsworth

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I think one can argue this either way, and I am happy with the way it is.

What seems crucial is its consistency with how text-based filtering works in Folders/Collections/Keywords. When you enter text that is in a parent but not in its children, only the parent is shown. While I wouldn't be against a Show Children option, I think the default works the way I want it to behave.

Rather than this colour filtering being a supposedly-useless feature, it really makes the colour labelling coherent. It's a broad brush, unsophisticated tool, but that's exactly what will make it adaptable for all sorts of uses.
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Edmund Gall

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I get what Anthony is saying. The behaviour he's asking for is similar to what macOS provides for it's colour tags on folders & files. The initial view when you select to filter on colour tags is to show all items - i.e. both folders and files - which are directly tagged with that specific colour. However, you do have the ability to open the tagged folders and see all of its contents - not just any of its sub-items that have the same colour tag. See the screenshot below for explanation:

I've tagged a mix of test folders & files wth red tags, orange tags or no colour tag.

When I click on the Red tag in Finder to filter or show me all items I've got with the red tag, then only the Test 1 and File 2.2 items appear in the initial list (shown as the left-most column), as they're the only red-tagged items I have. However, if I click on the Test 1 folder, Finder opens it and displays its full contents (as some - including me - would argue is logical for folder behaviour). Test 1 subfolder does not contain any red-tagged items, but I'm still able to see its contents and even drill down further into its own subfolders (which is the intuitive behaviour for folders): thus, I can eventually drill down to view the 2nd red-tagged item - File 2.2 - within the non-colour tagged subfolder Test 1.1.

I can see why the only or nothing approach would apply for colour tags on photos - because that is the ultimate item of interest to the user. But, surely, the ultimate point of a folder is its contents, not the folder itself. What would be the point of displaying a folder in a folder tree - even if it is a filtered folder tree - if you can't view all of its contents?..