Premiere Elements: Chinese characters not displaying properly

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  • Updated 1 year ago
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  • (Edited)
Simplified chinese characters are not displaying properly. I've had this problem before. Traditional shows up fine, but i don't use traditional. I would prefer it in simplified. I'm using premiere elements. the characters display as a box with an X thru it. :(
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Peyton Sharp

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Posted 1 year ago

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Peyton Sharp

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nevermind, i discovered any of the fonts near the bottom (fang song, simhei, simsum etc) solve this problem. Leaving this here so others can see.
(Edited)
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David, Official Rep

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Howdy Peyton,

Just so you or anyone reading this post knows, when you see the characters replaced by boxes or boxes with an X in them (also called "tofu boxes" in some terminology), regardless of language, it means that the glyph (character) for that symbol is missing from the current font and you need to select a different font.  By default, Photoshop will try to find an equivalent, but there's no guarantee (and similarly, if you select a run of text and the font goes blank, it means there are multiple fonts in the selection -- if you didn't do that on purpose, then it's Photoshop trying to help you by auto-magically replacing a missing glyph with another one from a similar font).  Missing glyphs can happen for any language, though admittedly, it's more common with languages that use a script other than Latin.

Good multilingual fonts are usually called "<whatever> Pro", though that's no guarantee it'll have the glyphs for the writing system you need.  In many cases, you'll just need to try it out or check the documentation.  Myriad Pro is a great font because it includes many different scripts within it.  Tahoma is another good one.  And, in Photoshop, you'll find that the fonts are grouped by language family -- first are the recently used, then SVG/emoji, then Latin-script (for most European languages, though they may include other writing scripts as well), then Japanese, then Traditional (Taiwanese) Chinese, then Korean, then Arabic/Farsi, then Hebrew, then Indic (and these are further subdivided into Devanagari, Gurumkhi, Tamil, etc), then Thai, then Simplified (Mainland) Chinese, and finally missing fonts denoted by "[<name of font>]".

Hope that helps,
David