CC and LR6 product separation, or 'the pressure begins'

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So there I am reading a tech tip in Australian Photography about Dehaze in Lightroom. That looks handy, I'll give it a try I think  . . . but; oh no, its not there! So after hunting around in the forums, I discover it is only active in CC and not in LR 6. Very disappointed but not unexpected by us cynical types.

Even though I've never ordered it, I've already had CC try to take control of my laptop. Many additional "management programs", many more background processes and a pre-occupation with forcing me to be logged into your servers and maintaining themselves rather than Lightroom. I had to get Adobe Support to log in to fix it.

So to the question. After you have forced me off LR 6 to CC, can I please keep control of my computers?
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Jeremy Wood

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Posted 2 years ago

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Cristen Gillespie

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> After you have forced me off LR 6 to CC, can I please keep control of my computers? >

That depends, I think, on what you mean by "keep control." I know one guy who is determined nothing shall run without his permission, but he is a programmer. He knows he may stop a process from running, only to discover a feature can't be accessed any longer without running that process. But he has managed, over time, to eliminate everything that isn't relative to his use and doesn't outright break something, and only once in awhile comes up with a problem. I'm pretty sure he's not a Lightroom user, though. He does this for Photoshop.

The Creative Cloud rarely intrudes when I'm using CR/Bridge and PS, but I'm always having to sign in with Lightroom and its kissing cousins—maybe because I use them a lot less often. But there are indeed a lot of background processes, and if you use the Cloud to communicate between apps, whether LR to LR Mobile or LR TV, or the CC Libraries to have files accessible, both between desktop apps and/or mobile apps and desktop apps, you're going to find they want to know it's you and that you have enough permission to do what you think you want to do.

If you really want to decide where everything gets installed and exactly what processes are allowed to run, you'll probably find that it's not going to be easy until you know clearly what they all do. If you're more flexible about it and willing to ignore the background processes, it will be easier to deal with those times when they want to notify you of updates, or ask you to sign in, etc.

So. . . how badly do you want CC and its nifty features? I'm a control freak when it comes to my images, so a lot of the features really matter to me, but I'm not much of a control freak when it comes to what Adobe decides to put in a folder on my hard drive. If I find something I can't understand that seems to be running amok, I ask about it. Other than that, I just let them do what they feel like so I can do what I feel like.  '-}
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Jeremy Wood

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I wrote my first program in 1972, around the same time I got to use my dad's SLR for the first time. I can indeed do as your friend did but why should I need to?  I've worked internationally as a consultant but I am not a computer nerd and don't play with them for fun. I do like that they are now more capable and reliable and I don't waste as much of my time fixing them. That doesn't mean I like the people selling me a software package to insist that I am now somehow beholding to them to watch my every use of it.
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Cristen Gillespie

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> That doesn't mean I like the people selling me a software package to insist that I am now somehow beholding to them to watch my every use of it>

I understand. I think if they pay attention in any personal way to whatever data they collect, they're buried in data with all the millions they must be collecting it from. And I also don't think they have the same nefarious intentions that many people have who already have more personal information of mine than I can possibly safeguard. Perhaps I should be worried by whatever information Adobe is gleaning from my use of their products, but I can't seem to bring myself to care.

Your mileage obviously varies, and I'm sure you've been weighing that against any possible benefits from an upgrade. All I can say is that yes, your computer will not always be an island unto itself if you subscribe. How detrimental that is, I really don't know.
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Jeremy Wood

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"but I can't seem to bring myself to care"
Are you sure? You've cared enough to write a lot of subtle rhetoric countering my cynicism about a well understood practice. Nice try pretending you think people look through our data personally; actually they use the computers to analyse it. Don't get this wrong, I don't think Adobe is a bad guy. But for example. . .  I had a problem with my head torch on a dawn shoot. Later I "googled" some torches. Next time I checked the weather on my Govt web site, the advert panel showed the same torch businesses. I do still care.

"weighing that against any possible benefits from an upgrade"
That was my point by the way, shortly I will have to choose, not between a licencing model but between a stagnant version and the new features in the other. (seen it before; over and out)
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Cristen Gillespie

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> Nice try pretending you think people look through our data personally; actually they use the computers to analyse it.>

I know they use data mining software if they're looking at all of us that closely. But if they're looking at "me," and not just collecting anonymous usage data, that's a bit more effort for it to mean anything to them as a business.

What they get from usage data could be detrimental to me, or it could work in my favor. Who knows? They'll see, perhaps, that <5% of their customers ever use Apply Image or Calculations, and that >75% use Auto Tone. What they do with that is anybody's guess, because at some point, humans have to make sense of the data. The computer isn't going to say that >75% use Auto Tone, but not Apply Image, because they can't figure out how to use Apply Image, don't even know it's there, and therefore Adobe ought to make Apply Image and Calculations one dialog and more accessible to us, more understandable.

But I believe you can still opt out of them collecting the anonymous usage data. You can't opt out of them knowing the status of your subscription and what you have/have not installed through that.  You can opt out of the features that push to you. Just turn them off. But as far as I know, they still ask on initial install if you want to participate in their program to anonymously collect some data about your usage. Intego tells me whenever they are connecting, asking my permission. So I know I'm being logged, if not personally. And some of what they push, as well as pull, without a doubt has an affect on performance—another issue with being connected and making use of all the features.

> Next time I checked the weather on my Govt web site, the advert panel showed the same torch businesses>

Yes, we're being tracked everywhere. It's tiresome. Sometimes it's even malicious, but not with most businesses. I weigh, as you are doing, the pros of being on a site, working with the software, etc., when I decide if there's anything a business or site can track or not. Ghostery is frequently blocking 7,8 up to 12 attempts for some company or other to pay attention to me. Who knows how many get through without my even knowing. Even watching what's going on is tedious and blocking them slows down my use of the internet.

I don't like that Google and Facebook and Instagram and Pinterest and Amazon and. . . are all watching me like a hawk, however impersonally, in order to send advertisements my way that they "think" I ought to be interested in.  I understand it's how they make a living, but I still don't feel comfortable with it. I have a grocery store that tracks, and most often go to the one that doesn't. As much as they say it's all for my benefit, I think it's all for their own. Direct advertising costs less. Selling information about my "habits" and "preferences" to whomever is too easy and lucrative for too many of them to give up.

But truthfully, with Adobe, I don't care that they see how I use the software. I prefer having a lot of people participating in their collection of usage data to focus groups dictating what I want or don't want. I think I gain from it as much as I give up. I could be wrong, but I don't see it, obviously, if I am.

Now, that's not saying I'm thrilled with subscription software. I still prefer perpetual licensing. But I also prefer Photoshop overall to any other image editor I've found to try. Others have some great features, some good interface ideas, but overall, PS is still ahead for the way I use it.