Elements 13: Cannot install 32 bit version to 64 bit Windows 7 computer

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Hello, I would greatly appreciate some insight and clarification about the following.  I have been getting conflicting answers about whether or not this is possible: installing the 32 bit version of Adobe Photoshop Elements 13 to a 64 bit Windows 7 computer.

Today I was given the following error message when attempting the install of PSE 13 to the 64 bit Windows 7 computer:
"Exit Code: 7  
Please see specific errors below for troubleshooting. For example, ERROR:  
SUMMARY  
-0 fatal error(s), 2 error(s)  
ERROR: This installer does not support installation on a 64-bit Windows operating system. Please download the 64-bit version of Photoshop Elements 
ERROR: System check returned with error: 6"


Originally I was wanting to see if it is possible to have TWAIN driver support for a 64 bit Windows 7 computer running the 64 bit version of Adobe Photoshop Elements 13 (the computer is hooked up to an Epson scanner).  The answer I received from Epson was that only the 32 bit version of Adobe Photoshop Elements 13 had TWAIN legacy driver support and that these were not compatible with the 64 bit version of PSE 13, their exact words the following: "Yes, using the 32 bit version of Photoshop elements with the plug in from Adobe should allow you to scan directly from within Photoshop. You are correct in that our Epson Scan/Twain drivers are 32 bit and will not work on third party 64 bit software programs."

I verified this with postings and articles by Adobe: to have TWAIN legacy driver support I would need the 32 bit version of PSE 13.  Now I'm finding out that the 32 bit version of PSE 13 cannot be installed on a 64 bit Windows 7 computer.

So my questions are, is the 32 bit version of PSE 13 incompatible with a 64 bit Operating system?  Was this always the case and if not, when did it change?  If the 32 bit version of PSE 13 is incompatible with a 64 bit OS, is there any other way TWAIN support can be enabled apart from switching to a 32 bit OS with the 32 bit version of PSE 13?  The people that use the scanner/computer were used to and preferred the TWAIN interface, as opposed to the WIA interface, so any help is greatly appreciated.
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dEchols

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Posted 1 year ago

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Steve Lehman

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Hello dEchols

Epson gave the right advice.  You can run your old Twain driver or run WIA support, and both are the same.  if you see a difference, you should not.  If you just prefer Twain over WIA because you utilized it in XP, the WIA support for XP is not the same kind in Windows 7, 8, or 10.  A 64 bit and 32 bit environment is not the same per each type of Windows Operating System but they should be backward compatible but only if you designate Windows to chose that mode.  The page frames are larger in 64 bit than in 32 bit systems, and unless you choose the mode, your apps will look for smaller page frames to place its app.  Then again, if you have a 16 bit app, and if it doesn't find a smaller page frame to run in, 16 bit apps have been known to begin changing the entire system including its page frames to 16 bit by "making" smaller page frames, so be aware of what you are using.  You could get a blue screen.  You can change your app to run in 32 bit compatible mode (or XP compatible mode) in Windows 7 and then it'll run in your Windows 7 64 bit environment as usual.  To do that you need to Run as Administrator.  To do that follow these steps: 

1. Simply right click the icon and select "Run as Administrator".  Now run it in compatibility mode.
2. Run in Compatible mode, right-click the icon, then choose "properties" and choose the 'compatibility' tab, then check-mark the "Run in Compatibility Mode" box.   

To summarize:  
Most apps won't have a problem running, as 64 bit is fully compatible with 32 bit software as long as you run it in 32 bit mode.  16 bit apps cannot run in a 64 bit OS.  BTW, a WIA driver is fine to run in 64 bit.  You can resolve all of this by downloading the proper driver for your scanner for Windows 7 64 bit.  Epson has those.  A WIA driver runs fine in Adobe Photoshop or in Elements as long as it's a 64 bit driver.  Try downloading the correct driver set, for your particular scanner.  I have 8 scanners and 5 computers.  I have a scanner from an old XP machine (still running) and I found a driver from Epson to run its old Epson scanner from 1998, in Windows 10.  

I didn't like WIA in 32 bit systems, but in 64 bit system WIA works great.  Twain was eliminated from Windows 10 so I use WIA.  You might get used to the change.   

Steve Lehman, MCSE responding, for Adobe Products
(Edited)
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dEchols

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Steve,

Thank you for your response in regards to TWAIN support vs WIA driver support as well as 32 bit and 64 bit versions of PSE 13 on a 64 bit OS.  It's been the clearest and most insightful response so far I've seen from anyone.

When you are referring to an 'app' are you referring to the installation of Adobe Photoshop Elements 13 (64 bit in this case) or the drivers/interface(TWAIN vs WIA) for the scanner?  Just wanting to clarify since I understand what you mean by running a program/app in compatibility mode.  Also for the sake of clarity, I believe you're referring to running the 64-bit version of PSE 13 in 32 bit compatibility mode?  Let me know if I've got any of that wrong.
(Edited)
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Michel BRETECHER, Champion

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Link to the Photoshop Elements system requirements (select version 13)
https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop-elements/system-requirements.html

"Microsoft Windows 7 with Service Pack 1, Windows 8 or Windows 10 (32-bit versions will be installed on 32-bit systems; 64-bit versions will be installed on 64-bit systems)"
As far as I know, the installer will not allow installing the 32-bits version on a 64-bits computer and OS.
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Steve Lehman

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dEchols

I was referring to Adobe App, as an App.  (Windows 7 does have compatible mode)  Above I said that since the real problem is scanner compatibility, my after thought was to install a new scanner driver for your early model scanner.  You didn't say which Epson model you have.  If you check the Epson support site, there could be a driver listed.  If there wasn't before, check again, sometimes it takes awhile for them to post one.  I think that's your best way to resolve this.   

For our own examples:   I build computers and mess with lots of software, but in my side business, we have a team of commercial photographers who need imaging machines for processing photo negatives, even for the (vintage) Brownie camera from 1956.  We are one of 3 who do those.  Our shop is not a copy-center, its a digital re-imaging process lab.  We have every digital and analog machine plus a dark room.  

Our older scanners might help you know scanners better:   
For our Epson 1250 from 1997, and there is a 32 bit and a 64 bit driver.  We didn't find it until Windows 10 hit the market.  Now, if you would like to update to a newer scanner I will recommend our Epson v800 scanner, sold to commercial operators, and if you use your scanner often, it's probably a good buy for home use.    If you need something larger, I can recommend our 17 inch Epson GT 15000 dating back to 2005, and as it is not improved often, its drivers become scarce, but we can find them if we wait long enough.  One was almost delivered to us in January and we have it now!   Like you, sometimes we need to wait a longer to find one.  For example, we didn't find a new driver for our 60 inch Epson 'slot' scanner, but after we bought our 48 inch 'slot' scanner as a replacement, Epson issued an updated driver for the 60 inch.  They are only image machines in different sizes and their drivers are almost the same.   

My best advice is keep checking Epson Support for drivers.  To do so, jump to this site, enter your scanner model number, then go through its wizard.  If not here, check back. https://epson.com/Support/sl/s


Steve Lehman, MCSE responding   
(Edited)
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Steve Lehman

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Big Postscript:  

Most older models such as those that use Twin drivers have been retired.  You may only find a generic driver for your scanner from a driver provider that wants to help those with older models with Twain.  Even then, they may not have Twain in their driver.  One provider is www.hamrick.com with VueScan software.  This is a qualified distributor, and VueScan has been on the market for almost every Windows version and works older scanners on every Windows OS.  VueScan has most everything including OCR.  It may not seat itself in your Elements software, as each application can operate differently.  

At hamrick, at its bottom-left corner, there is a link that leads to a list of older scanners.  The drivers may be 32 bit (again).  If so, download VueScan to scan images into a file that can be pulled into Elements, later.  

Epson sold VueScan under the name of GT7200U, to foreign countries and allowed other scanners to borrow VueScan for its own scan software.  Canon has VueScan for its bonus software.   WIA is the driver of choice among professionals.  To be frank, Twain had short calls.  Below, you will find that WIA and Twain were used together.

My suggestion to buy a newer scanner, stands.  I have been inside many printers and scanners and I can assure you that most brands cross-build their machines with a mix bag inside.  It's common to find Canon parts in a HP.  Cannon scanners have hardware parts from Epson and Epson software too.  Most pros won't use a scanner without Canon parts inside, only for Canon's camera reputation.   Then again, some pro's like myself have a 5 or more cameras, with Canon and Nikon both.  It depends if we want images fast on a Canon, or if we can take our time to set a camera computer on a Nikon.   Among our 5 cameras, I usually select 2 to 3 cameras for a shoot, both digital and film.  Canon sets up faster.  Nikon has more settings and I can get more out of it.  Nikon can use after-market lenses but the lens lacks auto-features, and I always go back to the Nikor lenses that work with a Nikon.  There's so many reasons for a pro to select certain brands.   Decide with confidence.  When it comes to scanners, most are alike, it's the software that does the job.  Try Vuescan, or buy another scanner.  Pro's buy equipment whenever Windows changes compatibility.    

Let's get the truth out about WIA and Twain.  WIA worked in cameras.  WIA always used Twain as its support, as Twain had a compatibility layer for WIA to work with Twain.  Most of the time, both worked together, and you probably didn't notice.  This link will explain the differences between WIA, Twain, Sane and other driver programming.  http://www.dynamsoft.com/blog/document-imaging/document-scanning-twain-wia-isis-sane/

Steve Lehman MCSE responding   
(Edited)