Photoshop: Can AdobeRGB color space in Photoshop in a sRGB display simulate physical AdobeRGB display?

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My display is a sRGB display, when I set the "color setting" in Photoshop into "Adobe RGB", I saw visible color changes. My question is: Does AdobeRGB in Photoshop in a sRGB display really show how a color looks like on a physical AdobeRGB display?
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Amy

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Posted 4 years ago

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Chris Cox

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No, because your sRGB display has a smaller gamut than an Adobe RGB display. Photoshop will do the best it can, but saturated colors will be clipped on your display.

And changing the working space should have no effect on the appearance of your open documents.
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Amy

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Thank you very much for your kind reply. I probably didn't describe clearly because I did see some difference when switching between AdobeRGB and sRGB. I opened a bmp image which has several color blocks whose rgb ranging from (1 1 0) to (0 1 0), that is from yellow to green along the chromaticity triangle. AdobeRGB and sRGB have different green primary, so these color blocks should look differently on sRGB display and AdobeRGB display. But because right now I don't have a physical AdobeRGB display, I am using Photoshop's AdobeRGB color setting to observe the difference on my sRGB display. I did observe some difference: when I switch to AdobeRGB in Photoshop on my sRGB display, the green blocks look more saturated but almost couldn't observe differences between neighboring blocks, while in sRGB mode in Photoshop on sRGB display, green blocks look less saturate but with visible color difference between neighboring blocks. Now I am worrying the color blocks displayed on my sRGB display in Photoshop's AdobeRGB setting will not be the same with those displayed on a physical AdobeRGB display. Can I use it in this way?
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Chris Cox

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Which setting are you changing? Again, changing the working space should have no impact on your document. Assigning a different profile would change the way the document colors are rendered.

You have an sRGB display - it cannot produce the same saturated colors that an AdobeRGB display produces. You can see a simulation of AdobeRGB, within the gamut limits of your sRGB display.
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Amy

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I just open the image in Photoshop, go to "color setting", switch between AdobeRGB, sRGB and display RGB, the color blocks didn't change when I switch between sRGB and display RGB, but did change when I selected AdobeRGB, the changes were described above. If these changes are results of simulation of AdobeRGB on a sRGB display, how does Photoshop do the simulation? What will the difference between the simulation result and the result on a physical AdobeRGB display be like? Thank you very much again.
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Chris Cox

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OK, you're changing the working space. That could only affect your document if your document was unmanaged (had no profile). In general for this sort of testing, you want to assign a profile to the document to change the interpretation of the color numbers (and correctly remember the assigned interpretation).

Photoshop is transforming the colors from Adobe RGB into sRGB, but clipping the colors that are outside the sRGB gamut - meaning that you lose detail in saturated colors. On an AdobeRGB display, there wouldn't be any clipping and you could see all the colors.
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Misbah Rahman

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here is the my problem. bcoz photoshop 2018 show srgb but when we again open that image in photoshop 2017 its showing original color profile. so how to soul this problem?
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Amy

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Fig.1. result in sRGB setting in Photoshop on a sRGB display


Fig.2. result in AdobeRGB setting in Photoshop on a sRGB display
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Amy

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black line indicates blocks where differences couldn't be observed.
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Amy

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Got it! Thank you very much for your time and help! Have a nice day.