Bridge: File corruption with Canon RAW files

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Help, Bridge is corrupting my files. RAW files from a Canon EOS 5D MkII are getting corrupted. I just recently updated ACR to version 6.4.1. Could that be a cause, though that was about 2 weeks ago and nothing happened until yesterday and today. Yesterday files downloaded from the camera appeared corrupt in ACR, however today, RAW files from yesterday's shoot that were good last night and were processed have appeared corrupted, and files from a series of photos from last week have also started to get corrupted. the corruption appears as multi colored vertical stripes either on the whole picture or a part, always on the edge. steve
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STEVE BISGROVE

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Posted 7 years ago

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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Steve, this issue is usually caused by hardware: a bad cable, card reader or card.
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STEVE BISGROVE

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Jeff, but this has happened with two different cards. Furthermore, yesterday (and last week) I worked on the same files which were fine then. Now all of a sudden they are unreadable.
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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If Camera Raw/Bridge were corrupting files we'd have tens of thousands of users reporting the problem - so we need to look at system specific problems (Hardware failure, or other software interactions).
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STEVE BISGROVE

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OK, I'm using an iMac with 3.2 Ghz proc. OS 10.6.7. Photoshop CS5 completely up to date. Canon EOS 5D MkII. I have downloaded my photos from two different cards using a media express card reader. However the strange thing is files that were ok yesterday and last week, are now unreadable (at least in Camera Raw) though earlier, before running permissions maintainance with Onyx, they were not readable neither with Preview nor with Quick look, now they are, and also processable with Canon's DPP. I'm still going to make a few further tentative investigations, with backed up files.
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Brett N, Official Rep

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Those kinds of color bands indicate corrupted image information. When "editing" images in Bridge/Photoshop you never actually change the original file. That's not possible with RAW files, hence the need for a Camera Raw plug-in. Instead, all of your edits are saved to an XMP sidecar file. Simply deleting this file will return your image to the original state it came off the camera. However, if you are having to run permissions repairs with Onyx just so you can read them in other applications, it sounds like you may be having issues with your hard drive, possibly bad sectors. Let us know what happens with the backups.
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Jeffrey Portelli

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I am having the same problem. I have used different cards, different cables, different computers, and different operating systems. My images are not corrupted when downloaded from my camera using the Canon EOS utility, and display fine in either the Canon or Windows image viewing utilities. I also took by camera to Canon to have it repaired, suspecting the camera's software might be the problem. It was not.

The only change that I have made is upgrading ACR, which I would have never suspected until reading Steve's post above.

What has become even more interesting is that, now being aware of the corruption problem, when I download my images using Bridge I quickly scan them as soon as the download is complete to see if they are corrupt. I can literally watch the corruption take place before my eyes. By this I mean I can scan the download and the images are fine, and within seconds I can watch random images change into the banded images posted above.
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Stephen Bisgrove

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Jeff, it sounds like exactly the same thing as happened to me, you're right. I watched the files currupt before my eyes as bridge "auto processed" each thumbnail. For me it turned out to be my external hard disk. So I put all the files and data from that disk onto a new one and have never had the problem since. Maybe that will solve it for you. Are you using the same disk for these images? Changing where these files are sited is the only think you don't mention as having done.
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Chris Cox

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That means that the thumbnail was intact (what you see first), but the RAW data was corrupt (which shows after the file gets processed and the RAW data read to create a more accurate thumb/preview).
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Stephen Bisgrove

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In the end the RAW files were processed, retouched and sent off and they were fine. Something was happening to them from the HD to Bridge, and the fault as far as I can see was my HD.
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Dazy Parker

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In my case, I converted the RAW files into JPEG format then, used a JPEG repair software. check this out: http://www.stellarinfo.com/jpeg-repair.php
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Randy Hunter

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Has anyone ever determined what is causing this problem?  I have the same problem with both a 5D mark II and III.

Did not start happening until I upgraded to CC.  CS5 on a 2nd computer does not corrupted the RAW or Jpeg files.

Help.!
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Gladys Klip

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I have the same problem, transferring my images from CF Lexar cards from 1dx and 5dmiv directly via either cable, card reader or via external hard drive but sometimes colored bands appear on my RAW images. It happened two years ago and now it happens again. My images are ok, not corrupted and I have several card readers so the hardware is not the problem. I also notice that LR6 does a 'auto-process' on the thumbnails on my images after I have uploaded them. So they appear fine and only after a while the glitching appears. Nothing wrong with my CF cards as I have 25 of them. 
I've noticed more people with different brand/cards have the same problem. Does Adobe looks in this at all and do they actually try to fix it? Otherwise, I am forced to use another software for processing my images and I don't want that. Hope someone reads this and takes action. 

Thanks in advance!
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Brett N, Official Rep

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Colored bands indicate corrupt image information. Where the corruption is coming from, whether a bad memory card, bad cable, or bad hard drive copy can usually be discovered by simple testing (test files from a different card, import with a different cable, or import to a different drive). 

But there are some fundamental things about raw files that must be taken into consideration. Adobe applications cannot and do not edit raw files directly. Bridge Camera Raw will filter your original raw file through your Camera Raw settings and provide you with a rendered view of that file. The original data is untouched. Also, when your first import your files and view them in Bridge the thumbnails you see initially are the embedded thumbnails created by the camera. This is a JPEG copy of your raw file with all of the camera's settings applied, creating a file that does not represent what your camera actually "saw". A raw file is simply what was captured by the camera sensor. For example, if your camera supports shooting in black and white, the camera sensor still sees the color of the shot. So your raw file will still be in color. The black and white is merely rendered by the camera and embedded in a JPEG. The camera may attach metadata to the file which tells some programs (such as the manufacturers native software) that a black and white setting was used, and a black and white filter will be applied to the raw file. 

So, if you import a file into Bridge and initially it looks correct and then suddenly the color bars appear, what has happened is:
1. Bridge displayed the embedded jpeg thumbnail.
2. Bridge read the raw information within the file and rendered a new thumbnail based on that information. 
Thus, while the embedded thumbnail is in fine condition, the raw data itself is corrupted and not providing enough information to render a new thumbnail. 
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Kurt

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I sporadically have this problem, but see no other logical explanation for its cause, besides Adobe Bridge being the one to introduce the corruption. I've got a set of raw files I imported into drive 1 from the camera CF card. I initially processed them in Bridge to open them into Photoshop and create several panoramic tiffs, and everything works fine.

Then, I wanted to make backup copies of those same RAW files. But every time I copy them to another drive, regardless of which drive or which location, some of those copied files are corrupted with the colored bands, and its always the same files, and always the same pattern of colors on the respective corrupted files, no matter where I copy them to, even after I clear the Windows clipboard and clear the cache in Bridge. This happens even though the files on the first drive originally imported can all open OK in Photoshop and do not appear to be corrupt.

To be sure of this, I did a DNG conversion of those original RAW files, on the same drive and in a subfolder of the directory where the original files were. After the DNG conversion, the same raw files that were corrupted when copied, were also corrupted when converted to a DNG, and again showing the same colored patterns, but all the original files can open OK. So now I essentially have a set of raw files that can't be backed up in any way. I can work with the originals, but there is something in the files that makes them unusable to Photoshop/Bridge when a copy is made or when processed into a DNG file.

It seems to me that what has to be happening is that Bridge is doing something to the RAW files when they are first processed that corrupts those files in a way that puts a defect in them carried over into any copy, but in a way that doesn't affect Bridge's ability to open the original file properly. There's no other explanation for having a set of original files that still open fine in Photoshop, but where the same five ones from that set are ALWAYS corrupt when the entire set is copied to another drive AND when processed into a DNG file.

    
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Gladys Klip

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It remains a mysterie what happens to the files. It happened to me when I open the RAW files in Lightroom 2 years ago and only recently with the same CF cards from Lexar. I use the cards both in 1dx and 5dmIV cameras (erase images and format in both cameras). As suggested by N. Brett, who responded to my problem, I think we can, however, rule out a couple of things: 1. the memory cards are not the problem, 2. (the sensors of) the camera's are not the problem and 3. the transfer from whatever device nor directly from the camera is.

What's left is the software in my opinion. But let me tell you what happened afterwards. When I clicked again in LR on the same images with the corrupted files a week or so later the strangest thing happened. After 2 seconds the colored stripes completely disappeared!! I couldn't believe my eyes, so I carefully clicked on all the corrupted files and every single images went back to normal. It was almost as I saw a short blink before they went back to normal. So I have no corrupted files anymore. Isn't that the weirdest thing? So let something explain to me now that it isn't LR who is doing something to my RAW files. My advice to you back up your corrupted files and wait a couple of days and click/open them again. Hope it works for you as well. 
However, it remains a worry and every time I upload images I get a bit nervous and I only upload one or two cards, wait a while and then continue uploading. This shouldn't be happening and although Adobe says it is not the software I do hope that one day someone finds the problem in the software.