Lightroom: Auto Tone over expose all images by large value

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  • Updated 1 year ago
  • (Edited)
1. Lightroom Auto Tone feature works incorrectly on the Mac version. On the Mac version it makes exposure much-much-much higher that it's required. 100% of the photos are over exposed after using the Auto Tone feature.

2. And it works much differently on iPad version. The Auto Tone feature should work the same on the both apps.

The Adobe support team are totally useless and can't do anything to help fixing the issue. Never saw so useless support in my life! It can explain why so serious issue exists for several years. I think you should change your support team leaders and rules first because it's the most important reason of all existing issues in your software.

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Dmitry

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Posted 2 years ago

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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Hi Dimitri, Would it be possible to get a copy of your raw file and the sidecar file with the auto-tone applied for our engineers to troubleshoot? It may help if we could see your Lightroom System Info. Launch Lightroom, and select Help > System Info... and copy/paste the text in a reply.
(Edited)
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Dmitry

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It's impossible to upload files with size more than 2MB. That's why I've uploaded the scaled image here. I'm using JPG files and don't use RAW files. I can reproduce the issue on more than 90% of my images. 9% of them have too high exposure after applying Auto Tone but not so ugly like other 90% of images. And only about 1% of images have something around the correct exposure.
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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You can use dropbox or CC sync to share a file. I can provide an email address if that's helpful.
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Dmitry

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Provide e-mail please. But you can do the same with the scaled image above. I think the result will be the same and I can check it and confirm.
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Dmitry

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And no one photo has really correct values after applying the Auto Tone feature.
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Jordan Jones

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This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Auto Tone ALWAYS dramatically overexposes my images (I shoot JPEG).

Whenever I use the Auto Tone function, it dramatically overexposes my photos. All photos are shot in JPEG on a Sony Alpha 6000 with a Sony 16-70 lens. I can't figure out why it does this. 

The first image is a photo with nothing done to it, the second is the same photo after applying Auto Tone, you can see how overexposed the auto tone version is. It does this pretty much with
every photo in my library.




This is what AutoTone did to the photo:
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tpnotes

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Hi,

I just want to add some things I noticed with auto tone:
- the problem that auto tone overexposes is much more prominent with the current process than with the previous one
- auto tone works okay with RAW files from Pentax K-x and Pentax K01 (the yellow one), but overexpose nearly all of the RAWs of Olympus OMD E-M1
- when applying a Olympus camera profile instead auf Adobe Standard as profile for the Olympus files, auto tone works much better
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Alan

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How do you apply an Olympus camera profile? It was my understanding that lens profiles for Olympus lenses are not necessary in LR.
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Richard Peters

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Alan: True, Olympus LENS profiles are not necessary. LR can derive this information from the Raw file typically (provided the lens used was supported in this respect, and corresponding instructions written into the Raw file, by the camera).

But as with any other camera, to interpret an Olympus Raw file's contents into a viewable image it is still necessary to base that conversion on one or another CAMERA calibration choice...

either "Adobe Standard", or else some other profile.

That provides a tonal and hue baseline, which then acts as a starting point for further adjustment.

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Alan

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OK, but the alternatives to Adobe Standard appear to be Camera Muted; Camera Natural;, Camera Portrait or Camera Vivid. Do you have a suggestion as to which might be more accurate?
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Victoria Bampton - Lightroom Queen, Champion

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Camera Natural is the emulation of what the camera jpeg would look like at default settings. Which you choose is personal taste.
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Alan

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Thank you