Bridge CC: Gets brought to its knees by animated GIFs

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  • Problem
  • Updated 4 years ago
It takes forever to generate a static image of animated GIFs the preview window. It never animates it. It's faster to force quit than to let it take its time getting nowhere.

Mac 10.9.5
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way phat

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Posted 4 years ago

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way phat

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BTW, I know this isn't normal behavior that affects most users, but it is a recurring problem for me. I guess some file gets corrupted? If there are likely suspects that I should delete or such, please let me know.
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way phat

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Is there another forum where help can be found?
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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Is there a way to post the raw image(s) that you're attempting to create the GIF from or is it too many or would it be too large? Zipping them up and uploading that ZIP to a place like www.dropbox.com and posting a pubic share link would be the usual way to share a file that is too big to include in a message.
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way phat

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Hi Steven, thanks for your help.

I'm not creating the GIFs. It's any GIFs, when it's in that mode. And restarting Bridge doesn't help.

However, today after an OS restart it's working fine.

Is it possible that a partcular GIF might be corrupt or have illegal characters in it's name or something that messes with the cache at the OS level?
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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The general way to narrow down on a specific thing that you're not sure which one of many is, would be to move half the items out of the folder to another folder and then restart and see if only one (hopefully) of those folders has the problem, then halve that folder's contents, again, and keep doing that until you have just a few items in a folder and you know one of them is the problem.

This is called a binary search. If more than one item exhibits the problem then both folders might have the slowdown occur and you'll want to try halving both of the halves until you have a partition of files that is ok and another that isn't.

You don't have to find the precise file, but just reduce the number you zip up to send to others to test with.
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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The other thing you can do is move a small fraction of the files to a folder, and if the folder with the small number of files already has the problem then you don't have to worry about the bigger folder of files, and just do the binary search on the smaller folder.

This second method is easier to use if there are quite a few bad files and you only need to have a small group to upload for others to test, and don't need to find all the bad files.

You probably won't know which of these methods to do until you've divided the files in half, once, and see if both halves have a problem or not, if so then there are multiple files with the problem and you can do this second method to one of the halves.
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way phat

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That's good advice, Steven.

Now what in a file could do this? I'm wondering if there are attributes I could look for from the get-go. Might it be in the name, or would it be something less obvious and more internal? Something I could search for in metadata?
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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I don't know what is special about one of the, that's why you're doing the binary or bucket search to find out.
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Yup. Binary search is what we use all the time to narrow down issues. Thanks Steve.