Automotive windshield

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  • Updated 2 years ago
How could we design the same exact drawing of the rear car windshield of a certain car model: lines, shaded parts around the edge, dots pattern ? Of course, I don't mean how to draw it (as drawing would take a lot of time, and the results most probably won't be very accurate), but I mean is there a way we can scan the glass or take a picture for it and import it to Illustrator or Photoshop then make some processes on it, in order to have the same accurate drawing with same dimensions ready for any other use, whether print it or to adjust it a little bit later.
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fadi

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Posted 2 years ago

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Graham Short Photography

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There might be a better way to do this, but here is what I would try: You will need a large sheet of white paper or a white blanket, and something to hold it in place behind the glass of the rear windshield, one or two speedlights and a camera with a trigger that can trigger the speedlights.
My idea is based on trying to make the background behind the glass all the same; plain white. 
1) place the speedlights inside the car so that they can illuminate the back wind shield.
2) attach paper or blanket to the inside of the frame of the rear wind shield. Get it reasonably flat and tight without any sagging or folds.
3) Take the camera and frame a shot of the rear wind shield from outside the car. 
4) Set your exposure so that the white blanket is illuminated by the speedlights  so as to JUST overexpose, without causing light flare. It will take a bit of experimenting with settings so use manual mode but you should be able to achieve a puppet shadow like effect of the rear windshield and its features against a white background, which is then easily imported into photoshop to process as you wish.

As a starting point I would suggest using the speedlights on full power and setting the exposure on the camera to ISO 100, 1/160th sec shutter speed, and an aperture of f/16. See how that works for you?
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fadi

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Thank you very much. Ok this is step one, then what would be the next step ? What should be the process used then, in order to transform it from an image to something we can adjust or modify later ?! Thanks again.
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Max Johnson, Champion

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If you are looking for a drawing art style, you could do the Image Trace, as Cristen suggested. If you are trying to make it a photo-realistic windshield, then you could bring it into photoshop and add solid color layers with the "color" or "hue" or "overlay" blendmode and use masks to isolate trim and other components. Then you change the color of the layer to whatever you need.
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Cristen Gillespie

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> import it to Illustrator or Photoshop then make some processes on it, in order to have the same accurate drawing with same dimensions ready for any other use, whether print it or to adjust it a little bit later. >

Are you thinking of Illustrator's Image Trace? If the photo is extracted from it's background, you can use the photorealistic setting with the maximum number of colors, and have a windshield you can use at any size for print or web. But it is a "drawing" then. If you make it much larger, the traced areas, rather than the contone of a photo, will be obvious.

And it can be difficult to ensure fine details are traced (play with the Advanced settings) although if you have most of the glass looking right, adding a layer to create the defrost lines across the back is simple enough. One stroked top, one bottom, and use the Blend tool with Steps. Or just copy, move, transform again, and then distribute, though you'll then need to individually adjust the paths to match the windshield shape. Could use the image (on a layer below the image trace) to help out.  A "dots" pattern??? would also likely be easy to create. It's all the realistic shading that takes a long time, and Image Trace can probably handle that.

I can't tell from your description if the results would be what you're looking for, though, since you're moving from pixels to vector, and the look will still be fairly illustrative.