Photoshop: Automatically resize content and stretch canvas to accomodate new elements

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Not sure what happened to the feature request thing Adobe had before but I have an idea for Photoshop that would be great for efficiency. I work on a lot of emails and let's say you have a set canvas at 1100px high. You need to add something in the middle of that canvas though that is 250px high and in order to fit it in there, first you have to resize the canvas by using the crop tool or canvas size to make it taller, then you have to move everything underneath it to make whitespace in order to fit the new 250px element in. It's a lot of manual moving around just to put something in if you need to readjust elements.

It would be great if there was a photoshop feature where you could place an element on the canvas and it would automatically push everything up and down so you could put the new element in between the graphics that are already there. So you would drag something onto the canvas and it would squeeze in between other elements and push everything else out of the way to fit. Is this possible to implement?
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Alex

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Posted 7 months ago

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Max Johnson, Champion

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Add move elements first, then Image-> Reveal All will at least get you  the canvas resize part automatically.
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eartho

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you're talking about liquid layouts... which is why we use InDesign =)
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Alex

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unfortunately reveal all doesn't work if you have items that are off the canvas but not cropped. So if I have an image that has half of it cutoff by the canvas but I didn't crop the pixels permanently, then reveal all will open up to that as well making the email wider than I want. Yes basically I'm asking for liquid style layouts for Photoshop where you could drag and drop something in and things would move to fit it
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eartho

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I don't understand how this would really save any time. If Ps did this automatically, there's no guarantee that it would be done exactly as you needed it to be, so you'd still have to fine tune everything... which would take as long as doing it by hand in the first place.
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Alex

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Why couldn't it do it automatically correctly every time? However much space the new element takes up is how much space the other elements would have to push up or down. So you drag a new element in between other ones, it shifts everything either above it or below it down however many pixels that is, say 250px, and then adjusts the size of the canvas as well. I'm imagining a sliding motion where everything slides up or down to let it fit in there. Then you could set gutters in a panel for this tool that would give a certain amount of margin around the new element so it has breathing room.
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eartho

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Again, that's what InDesign and XD are for. I'd rather Adobe not spend their time and resources dedicated to making Ps a page layout program.
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Alex

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Who makes emails in indesign? Funny you say that because I wonder why they made art boards in photoshop then if they didn’t care about using it for any interfaces. This is a good idea that can save time, are you on the adobe team?
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Cristen Gillespie

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> Why couldn't it do it automatically correctly every time?>

Probably because it's just a computer and we are able to want an infinite number of different responses to the same basic situation. Even ID can't get it right much of the time, which is why we have so many controls to help us create and modify liquid layouts. It's certainly no push of a button to work with them.

Here I have to agree with Earth. If you want automatic layout adjustment to start you on your way to a layout with different dimensions, then you use layout software. If you want PS to start automatically shoving elements around on your page, scaling whatever it thinks needs to be scaled to make it all fit somehow—I can't imagine a computer being able to make  decisions like that without me taking a lot of time to fix what it did more often than not. 

If it were just for a very limited layout situation that could somehow be automated, then I'll bet you can find someone who can script it. Considering how much you do of this, it's probably well worth your while asking if someone could provide a script for it.

I doubt there are enough users for a PS to tackle it, though. And there's just so much that PS needs to be doing, even when it comes to layout, that almost everyone could make use of—guides that are created at angles, guides from objects, an automatic Show Center toggle—the list could be continued.
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Max Johnson, Champion

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I wonder why they made art boards in photoshop then if they didn’t care about using it for any interfaces.
Because they were solving a different problem. The issue you have to solve is that you have a layout that is fluid. Artboards were meant to address the issue of needing to design to more than one static layout. If you wanted to use artboards the way they were intended, you could make 4-5 artboards in the same document with a different number of items and heights in each. Not what you want, but using the tool the way it was designed.