Autoamtic dust removal tool

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  • Updated 2 months ago
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This conversation has been merged. Please reference the main conversation: Lightroom/Camera Raw: Automatic scratch and dust removal

There are many post to this idea but adobe is sleeping - good morning!
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Siegfried Wohlgemuth

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Posted 1 year ago

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Keith Anderson

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Hmmm... One reply after ten months.  I guess in the days of digital cameras, few have dust spots to remove.  I've tried a competitor's product: SRDx.  It worked sometimes, but left a lot of repairs to be done manually in Photoshop with the spot healing brush. 
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Mark Gilvey

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I use SRDx. Photoshop and Lightroom could learn something from them. The trick to SRDx is don't think of it as the final edit. I use it globally and then hide the flaws with a layer mask in PS. It is a bit clunky but when you shoot something on black and you discover dust that have first and last names, spotting in LR or PS is just futile. My vote is for an SRDx style solution but it could use some improvements. 
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Keith Anderson

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I like to thank helpful people, and this seems to be the only way.  Thanks, Mark.  I'm less enthusiastic about SRDx than Mark.  For some slides, I copy the background to two new layers, and filter one with a Median filter of 2, and the other with 4.  I mask each fully black, and put white dots or lines where I want the filter to do its trick.  It works a lot less well than I hoped, but it solves some problems that defeat other tools, like the spot healing tool and/or the clone stamp.   After a lot of trial and error, I think Pshop needs a tool with the look and feel of the clone stamp but that does the equivalent of select then fill then deselect.  For scratches in particular, Pshop looks too far away from the scratch to find good pixels and just replaces the scratch with a different blemish, often two of them, one either side of where the scratch was. 
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Mark Gilvey

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Thanks Keith. I'll give the Median filter a try as well. I used to find Dust and Scratches helpful for large areas where detail isn't important but haven't used it for a while. This would be really helpful if Adobe would work on this a bit more. 
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Keith Anderson

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Initially, I used the dust and scratches filter often, because of its obvious name.  It has two sliders, and I found it difficult to use, but had some success on some large flat areas, like walls of industrial buildings that do and should look dull and dreary.  I had less success on vegetation. 
Later, I read advice somewhere, possibly in this forum, that the dust and scratches filter isn't as clever as its name suggests and that the median filter might deliver similar results and be easier to use.  That has certainly been my experience. 
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David Converse

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I use frequency separation and median. There is also a trick of adding a Levels adjustment layer and moving the black slider way to the right. That will increase contrast and help show the spots (especially against lighter areas such as sky or a light colored wall.)
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Keith Anderson

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I haven't tried frequency separation.  I hope it is fun and isn't too advanced for me.  I seem not to need to increase contrast to see spots; those on my images stand out like dog's balls, but I'll have fun discovering what it does.  Thanks.   

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