Lightroom: Auto tone with LR 3.5 and Sony A77 v1.04 at high ISO exhibits pinkish/reddish tone

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  • Updated 6 years ago
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Upon importing my high ISO RAW shots (more than 3200 ISO) in LR 3.5 taken with my Sony A77 v1.04 and with an auto-tone import preset, the dark areas exhibit a strong dominant pinkish/reddish tone (color shift).

I suspect it being a bug - it doesn't happen on my high ISO shots taken with my Sony NEX-5.

When resetting the develop parameters, the color shift disappears (see attached picture taken at 6400 ISO). Problem reappears when reapplying auto tone.



Thanks for your help.
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Disinto

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Posted 6 years ago

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jdv, Champion

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Under extreme circumstances, auto-tone can got confused. Think of it as a potential starting point rather than a tool you always apply.

Otherwise, perhaps Adobe can use this as a hint to tune the response for this camera.

Speaking of which, have you applied a camera profile as well? I wonder if that is involved.
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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When comparing two AutoTones it is useful to describe what is happening with the Toning sliders, giving the values, rather than just saying something looks wrong.

To me the "pinkish tone" looks like the color of thermal sensor noise that the camera unfortunately produces excessive amounts of and that the AutoTone-computed slider values may be accentuating by too much Fill Light and too little Black clipping. In other words I don't think LR is adding this pinkish color, it is already there and just very dark. AutoTone is applying Fill because it assumes there was something in the background that should be brightened, where in this case all we're seeing is the pinkish noise texture.

Try double-clicking on the Blacks slider or the Fill Light slider after doing the AutoTone to reset them back darker and see how things look.
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Disinto

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John, I didn't apply any camera profile but just a lens profile. Speaking of which, it also produces pinkish hues in the corners after correcting distortion.

Steve, that's right and I've tried my best to manually reproduce the behavior, but I think there's clearly a problem here. I'll retry tonight.

While I acknowledge that the pinkish tone may well be due to the thermal noise, I think ACR hasn't reached maturity when it comes to developing RAW of these Sony's new high resolution APS-C sensors (A77/NEX-7). The behaviour starts appearing even at ISO 800 and can truly ruin some of my high ISO pictures (or to be more honest, reduce my hope of brightening them).

There's a clear color shift (magenta) that can be partially corrected when playing with the magenta slider in the camera calibration toolbox. However, until Adobe introduces some enhancements for A77/NEX-7 RAW handling or publishes an ad-hoc A77 calibration file, I'll consider it as a stopgap solution as it affects the entire image - not just the pinkish parts.

I can post some RAWs in case you're interested to see this behaviour. Thanks for your comments.
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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The application of a lens profile would be the reason for the slightly lighter corners.

Yes please upload a high-ISO sample RAW or two, with black-in-the-distance background, one from the A77 and one from the NEX5 if you can.

The reason I say this is just the low-level camera-sensor noise being amplified is because I saw the same thing with a Nikon Coolpix 5000 and Canon 300D RAWs back fro when I was taking long exposure night-sky shots through a telescope, as well as seeing similar pinkishness on a Sony DSLR a couple years ago. The higher-resolution sensor the smaller the photosites so the more intense of a single stray electron can have.
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Disinto

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Thanks Steve. I'll post that tonight. I don't have NEX-5 shots in the same situation but I have other low-light, high ISO for a fair comparison.
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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For the record, doing an Auto Contrast on a Sony A77 high ISO ARW file in Picasa also shows a pinkish tone for dark areas that are brightened, so it is not unique to Adobe processing and I still contend this is the color of the high-ISO noise in Sony DSLR cameras.