Photoshop: CS6 APC_Index_mismatch BSOD (Video Driver issue)

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  • Updated 6 years ago
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I keep getting APC_INDEX_MISMATCH BSOD upon running a content aware fill in a large document. Typically this is a hardware error, but in this instance it definately has to do with Photoshop and /or the latest Nvidia drivers.

Win 7 x64 Ultimate N SP1 with PS CS 6 Extended (updated) with ample specs (16 GBs ram SSD drvie has PS install). Dont know how to post the log
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Allan Smith

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Posted 6 years ago

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Allan Smith

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Document only had two layers, also had much transparency gamut surrounding image.

Wierd thing is that an even bigger selection wouldnt cause this to happen (like the inverse of the panorama that sat at the bottom). Before you say: it is a memory error or something, please note that this is reproducable with a particular selection...and larger selection doesnt cause this error.

Compositionally it didnt encumber me, but I think this wont be the last time this happens. PS CS6 restore feature works pretty ok however in my experience
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Chris Cox

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Can you post the rest of the details from the BSOD?

Most likely this is a video driver issue (since applications cannot cause a BSOD themselves).
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Allan Smith

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thanks chris, I will post the log but the default setting to win7 is auto reboot on bsod (I'll see if I can get the log file tomorrow and post it when I get back into the office tomorrow
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Allan Smith

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thanks chris, I will post the log but the default setting to win7 is auto reboot on bsod (I'll see if I can get the log file tomorrow and post it when I get back into the office tomorrow
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Natisha Joshi

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I'm seeing a similar problem with Photoshop CS6 using the high-pass filter on a single layer image.

I don't want to detract from OP's problem but it sounded similar to mine so I thought I would post what I know so far. I'm going to be running some memtests on my 8GB of RAM, etc later today. I'm running Win 7 x64 SP1 on a system with multiple hard drives - keeping control (ie: programs) and data separate, with plenty of scratch for PS. Not sure exactly what kind of H/W I have as my hubby put the computer together for me - and I can't find the build invoice.

I've had these BSODs happen consistently with two different NVIDIA cards (just swapped out my old MSI card with an EVGA GTS 250 last night) - just updated the NVIDIA drivers etc last night.

- Details for BSODs:

Results normally in BCCode 1 or 1a; running WinDBG on the minidump indicates an APC_INDEX_MISMATCH bug that occurred during the Photoshop process:

- Output from recent minidump (BCCode 1)

BugCheck 1, {fffff8000316f772, 0, fffd, 0}
Probably caused by : ntkrnlmp.exe ( nt!KeUserModeCallback+e6 )

FAULTING_IP:
nt!KeUserModeCallback+e6
fffff800`0316f772 8bd8 mov ebx,eax

CUSTOMER_CRASH_COUNT: 1

DEFAULT_BUCKET_ID: WIN7_DRIVER_FAULT

BUGCHECK_STR: 0x1

PROCESS_NAME: Photoshop.exe

...

MODULE_NAME: nt

IMAGE_NAME: ntkrnlmp.exe

DEBUG_FLR_IMAGE_TIMESTAMP: 4fa390f3

FAILURE_BUCKET_ID: X64_0x1_SysCallNum_10be_nt!KeUserModeCallback+e6

BUCKET_ID: X64_0x1_SysCallNum_10be_nt!KeUserModeCallback+e6
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Chris Cox

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Darn, no further information on which driver caused it.
It's almost definitely a driver, and probably a bug in the way the driver calls the kernel -- but we don't know which driver.

Most likely are video and hard disk, but it could even be part of the OpenGL/OpenCL system code.
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Natisha Joshi

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I think I've solved my particular problem.

So memtest86 showed some problems with memory addresses between 6800K and 8191K - after running various tests, it looks like a bad slot (4th and last slot on my motherboard) instead of a bad module.

Since it's the top quarter of RAM affected by the bad slot, I can only guess that the consistent crashes in Photoshop were a result of actually using the top 2GB of RAM during the high pass filter - I can't think of any other programs I run that are as memory/CPU intensive. I'm not really familiar with how the Windows OS works - so it's just a guess.

Running on only 4GB now, I haven't had any BSODs using Photoshop.
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Natisha Joshi

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Quick update. Removing the faulty RAM appeared to solve the problem for a couple days. But now it's back. Not sure what to do at this point.

Photoshop probably causes a BSOD on roughly 30-50% of my photo edits - needless to say, productivity is at a low.
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Chris Cox

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No, applications cannot cause a BSOD. Only hardware, the OS, or low level drivers can cause a BSOD. Really, that's why it's a BSOD and not a just normal application crash - because something went wrong at a lower level than applications can access.
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Sandra Chung

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Sorry, but you're wrong: It's USUALLY, not always. I won't argue with you about it, but I know I'm right, after 20+ years in PC repair/building and IT support. .

http://pcsupport.about.com/od/fixthep...
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Chris Cox

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You might wish to consult a more definitive site. Particularly a site that understands kernel protections, hardware faults, and other important details. But even the about.com article talks about troubleshooting the hardware, OS, and drivers, not applications.
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Sandra Chung

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That was for the other person's benefit, not mine, to show that it's not always hardware. It was the in simple terms, that a layperson can understand. I comprehend that there is no way an Adobe employee will admit in a public forum that their software will cause a BSOD.. fine, have it your way, but I, and other techs, know better. have a nice day.
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Chris Cox

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It isn't always hardware: many times BSODs are due to bugs in low level drivers, and sometimes bugs in the OS. But BSODs cannot be caused by applications.

I'm sorry you do not understand modern operating systems. And I'm sorry that you have been previously misinformed about the nature of BSODs. But please do not try to mislead other users into believing that applications could somehow be responsible for kernel/hardware/BIOS level errors - because they cannot.