Adobe Sign In Issue - One VERY Upset Customer!

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  • Updated 7 months ago
Merged

This conversation has been merged. Please reference the main conversation: Photoshop/Lightroom: Loss of internet connection and license

OK, I will tell you at the outset, this post will NOT get vulgar or rude. That said, you have one VERY PO'd customer on your hands. Here's the deal:

I was away from home and without internet access yesterday (I let 24 hours pass before writing this so the fact I'm still this upset is a sign of how serious I think this issue is). I have been signed into Adobe CC and have used Adobe CC (Photoshop, Lightroom and Bridge) every day for the past 3 months. I am a long time subscriber to the Photography Plan (from its inception) and the Single App Plan. Yesterday I did emergency duty as a wedding photographer at a wedding I was attending. I promised to do some base processing of select images (these were all shot in RAW) and get them copies that evening for a couple of reasons that are not important to this discussion. No problem, I had my LT with me that has the second copy of Photoshop and Lightroom installed (as per the EULA) and has in the past also been used to process images in both LR & PS. When I opened Bridge to import the photographs the login screen told me I was not connected to the internet, which was correct - the internet service was down. I thought that was no problem since in the Adobe CC FAQ's that addresses this possibility, Adobe stated that you merely had to be connected at least once in 90 days (and even then there may be a bit of leeway) for the subscription to be verified. I had been connected in the previous 24 hours so I figured everything would work. It didn't. The login screen told me that my subscription could not be verified and Bridge shut down. I attempted to open the program a total of 4 more times before I gave up. I tried to open Photoshop and Lightroom with the same results. This could have cost me a job and my client a lot of money. Thank GOD I also had Capture One installed and I was able to get the job done!! 

This is completely and totally unacceptable! I am a paid up member in good standing, and I am being denied the service despite having met the criteria for the subscription. I know the EULA says that Adobe is not responsible for lost work, etc. due to any failures of their program, but you may find that someone is going to test that condition in a court of law at some point if this keeps up. You may also want to consult with your legal department what the term the courts use when you accept money for a goods or service but fail to provide that goods or service despite the customer meeting all the requirements of the EULA. 

This will NOT happen again with me. As a photographer I DO have options. I WILL be cancelling my Single App subscription largely as a result of this episode because I no longer trust Adobe to meet their end of the bargain. 

If I were the only one ever to have seen this issue, my tone might be more moderate, but I'm not. Since CC2019 this seems to be an increasingly common problem. I have seen numerous others on this forum and elsewhere of late, complaining about similar issues. I also might be more moderate (or not have subscribed to Adobe CC at all) if this potential issue had not been addressed in the FAQ's when Adobe went subscription based, to my satisfaction. It would appear as though the answer given there is not factual, OR your new login procedure is seriously flawed/broken. For those of us who make a living from our photography, the make/break lines can be rather thin and it looks totally unprofessional when a photographer can't even open the processing program he or she has paid for. I do understand piracy is a major issue for software companies and I sympathize deeply with that (I have even reported a pirate in the past), but I am sick of paying the price these pirates when I'm adhering to all the rules of the EULA. This is just the latest and most egregious example of the customer being penalized for the law breakers.

In conclusion, I have one suggestion that I think Adobe had better seriously consider (along with the unbelievably large number of broken components we are finding in Photoshop CC 2019):

FIX IT!!!

If you have suggestions as to why this is happening, I will listen and I will be respectful in my replies, but I will not accept excuses. I am the customer here and I expect to be treated as such.

Glenn
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Glenn Davy

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Posted 7 months ago

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dmeephd

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Hear!  Hear!

Sorry about your experience, but you are absolutely correct.  Adobe cares more about making money than earning money.  They have sung the priracy songs for so long its become trite.

Clearly, based upon the legion of bugs and breraks in the latest versions of Lightroom and Photodhop, Adobe is spending more money on loss preventation (read: licensing schemas and scans) than product development.

Despite the EULA, or perhaps because of it, one day there will be a class-action lawsuit in a federal court.
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Jaroslav Bereza

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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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If I was in that situation, I'd try using a Wi-Fi hotspot on my phone long enough to get an internet connection to start the program.

I wonder if the issue is that the 90-day token is only renewed every 90 days instead of every time you login, and your lack of internet happened on the 91st day, so you're SOL.
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dmeephd

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Do you think Adobe should have a 'grace' period, of say, 10 days before cutting off their paying customers?  Sometimes we working pros are on location where there is no internet or cellphone access.

Svalbard.  Greenland.  Wrangel Islands.  The Pribilofs.  Antarctica.  Botswana.  Zambia.  Namibia.  You know...places like that which are not Times Square.
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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The issue from the thread that was a suggestion for being merged into was that the customer apparently had their system time set backwards, probably by some time-sync service, or distance-of-travel, but the system time getting set back is also a sign someone is trying to extend a trial or end-of-subscription window beyond the designated cutoff time, so Adobe disables the software until the license can be verified from Adobe through the internet.
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dmeephd

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No, the real issue is that Adobe is so damned greedy they can't stand the idea that someone, even an established paying customer, has use of their bug-infested products for one bloody day beyond the subscription.

Funny thing is, Adobe goes ahead and charges the credit card on file prior to the end of the subscription whether the customer is connected to the internet or not.  So your argument does not hold water.
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Richard Kain

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I am not an Adobe employee.

I do think I know what problem you are having and how to prevent it from happening again. I think it is really simple: First, each computer has its own record of your interactions with Adobe. Apparently your laptop had not been connected to Adobe for more than the 90 days that I think is the time limit, so the programs thought that they'd better check your licensing status. Your response indicates that you'd expect that Adobe knows that this is the same person as the one that was using a different computer. Actually your licensing status is stored in your computer, not at Adobe.

All you have to do to avoid this problem is to prepare for the event by simply opening an Adobe application on your laptop before you go to the event. (Obviously, you need to have Internet access to do this.)
(Edited)
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dmeephd

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Not sure you're correct here.  I added an additional Mac to my stable and Adobe never asked anything upon installation of the programs.  There are programs which insert license keys on your hard drive, but I've never seen evidence which indicates Adobe follows this practice.

If anyone knows for sure, please chime in, because if this is the case, then Richard's advice is sound and spot on.  Otherwise, it would be fruitless and give users a false sense of security when they get out into the internet-less world.

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