Photoshop: "Stamp visible" (cmd-opt-shift-e) will not work if current layer is hidden

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  • Updated 6 years ago
  • (Edited)
"Stamp visible" (cmd-opt-shift-e) should create a new layer (above the currently selected layer) containing a flattened copy of the image.

The shortcut will not work if the currently selected layer is hidden. There is no logical reason why it shouldn't do this.

Workarounds:
* Create a new layer before hitting the shortcut (I usually do this).
* Change selection to a visible layer and then move the resulting layer to the correct position in the stack (above the hidden layer where you wanted it).
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Jonas M. Rogne

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Posted 6 years ago

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David, Official Rep

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This is because all of the layer-based Merge commands are disabled when you have a layer selected that's not visible. This is as designed; there are MANY things you cannot do on a layer that's not visible. Why would you want to edit a layer that's not visible to you and doesn't impact your document?
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Jonas M. Rogne

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Seems you misunderstand me. I'm not trying to edit the invisible layer in any way. I'm trying to create a new layer.
(you might be confusing it with "merge visible"?)

** Practical example: **

1. I have an image. I've performed a curves adjustment, and then a Vibrance adjustment that I've then turned off (for whatever reason):

2. I want a merged copy on a new layer. Do do Liquify (or whatever).
3. I click to Stamp Visible to a new layer by hitting ctrl-alt-shift-e (windows) / cmd-opt-shift-e (os x).
4. Nothing happens.

Current solutions:
A. If I select another visible layer, it works, but the new layer is unfortunately not above the Vibrance layer (where I wanted it) so I have to move it afterwards.
B. I can create a new empty layer before hitting the shortcut.
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David, Official Rep

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Howdy Jonas,

Yes, I do understand your example, but when a given layer is turned off, most layer-based functions are likewise turned off. This is a feature for most users to avoid unwanted adjustments to layers they've removed-but-not-deleted (probably because they don't want to actually delete them).

The problem you're encountering is that the shortcut for Stamp Visible doesn't work. And that's as designed. All shortcuts function based on commands and when a layer is turned off, the commands for Merge Visible, Merge Down, and your Stamp Visible are all likewise disabled (in order to protect the average user's workflow). Making changes to such a workflow could have disastrous consequences to other users, who rely on the functionality that disabled layers are (generally) "non-reactive".

Does that make sense?

Have a great day,
David
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Jonas M. Rogne

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Howdy and thank you for the swift reply!

Your explanation would make sense if "Stamp Visible" was a function that might in any way affect or depend on the selected layer (it only needs it to know where to insert the new stamped layer).

"Select All > Copy Merged > Paste" is essentially the same as "Stamp Visible" and works well (but it's three steps using the clipboard instead of one simple shortcut).

Following the similar reasoning the "paste"-command would also be disabled as it inserts pixels on a new layer above the currently selected layer (just like Stamp Visible). I understand that behind the scenes it works differently, but from the user's point of view we are simply inserting things on a new layer. The fact that the layer below what we insert is hidden should not matter.

You mention "stamp visible" above a hidden layer having possibly disastrous/unexpected consequences for other users. Do you have an example of a workflow where the user wants to insert a flattened copy of their image on a new layer, but don't want it to happen if the currently selected layer is hidden?
I have never encountered this situation myself, but many times I happen to have hidden layers in my documents (that might be selected when I try to Stamp Visible).
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David, Official Rep

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Hi Jonas,

Actually, where to insert a layer, in this case the stamped one, is a function of what layer is selected. The function is disabled because it's part of an entire suite of commands that are disabled. And it is the entire suite of commands, rather than Stamp Visible, that I was referring to when I said it could impact users in undesired ways.

A web designer, for instance, might have 100 type layers in his document, but only 20 are visible. The rest are needed, but for reference rather than display. If he accidentally targets one of those layers and does a Merge Down, what happens? Do we trash his invisible data or do we merge it even though it's invisible?

Your are correct, however, that your example is a little different (unique even?) in that there isn't so much a good logical reason to disable Stamp Visible as technical and workflow concerns. We disable the whole suite of commands because they are generally dangerous for users in this context. Changing just Stamp Visible would mean exposing a derivative command, but not the intermediary steps as well as possibly introduce a number of workflow bugs and issues.

I can log a feature request if you like, but I would think most folks would rather that development effort allocated to cool new features or enhancements.

Whaddya think?
Thanks,
David
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Jonas M. Rogne

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Log a feature request.

I makes sense that the only reason it is disabled is because it is contained within a suite of other functions that should be disabled (like merge down). Maybe some time in the future it could be moved outside of that set, or somehow expose it as you mention (if this seems possible without creating a mess of your code).

I'll cross my fingers (but with low hope) that it will be included some time in the future together with all those other "minor" tweaks that I find so helpful in improving the overall experience of Photoshop. The last one I really enjoyed was finding out that cmd-j in CS6 works for duplicating layers (not only selected areas). That was something I kept clicking naturally in previous versions somehow expecting it to happen! :)