Photoshop CC 2014: What happend to the Oil Paint filter?

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I'd like the oil paint filter back. When I'm shooting models in the fields, this filter ads a van Gogh'ian touch to the background, if not overdone. It needs to be strokes, so just a soft filter wouldn't cut it.
And no, running two installations on the same machine to feature a single plugin is not a solution, it's not even a propter workaround.
I liked the idea you had a couple of versions back, where you were able to download the filter as a separate plugin from adobe labs or Adobe marketplace, I'm not sure.
And I truly would appreciate a splash screen *before* the update to notify of any plugin dismissal beforehand - I'm sure this was notified in some Adobe forum beforehand, but since I, for one belong to the working world, I can't afford to spend all of my time in all forums for all the software that I own.
Cheers,
Michael.
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Michael Rapp

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Posted 5 years ago

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Gregory Katsoulis

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Steve, thanks for posting a solution. I do have to register that, while it works, it is an absurd solution. To keep an entire previous version of Photoshop in order to access a single filter is ridiculous. It is a solution that will eventually fail as newer hardware becomes incompatible with older software.
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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An engineer posted that the oil paint filter was using old technology that's no longer compatible with the newer PC CC 2014. I don't know what that means, exactly, although it seems like it's not just an arbitrary solution, but some sort of judgment of cost-benefit that went against re-engineering of this and a few other filters/methods.
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Philip Sustachek

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I don't think it actually was. The original filter was written in opengl language or cuda, I forget which one, but nothing that would be really phased out I believe. It was interesting that the original filter was lumped in with pixel bender which was phased out because it utilized flash 10 which did get phased out obviously. Pixel bender was updated and made available through pixel bender accelerator, but the code and math that it was written in originally had nothing to do with them. It was a full on adobe 8bf which almost certainly had to be ported to visual c++ cause that's what their library supports to make that type of file.

It probably just needs to recompiled with the new adobe includes in the new cc 2015 plugin library, but the writer, I think Krypandis, who I've been trying to make contact with doesn't seem willing to do so I guess? Or maybe even can't? Maybe he wants to sell it instead of giving it to adobe and whatever deal they make, but no leads on that yet. This may be a more complex issue dealing with the writer who was external to Adobe and how this was published and included in photoshop than it does having to do with it using outdated technology.

At it's core is math theory and an understanding of it, this can be rewritten in any of adobes sources by a programmer that knows what they're doing. I've been studying to understand it and rewrite it for months now and made a lot of progress..that probably could have been done by someone that knew what they were doign and spent years in school for this sort of thing unlike me relatively easily. I've been tearing my hair out trying to understand calculus and pde's coming from an art background it's really tough.

I've been making progress of understanding the math and made some headway although my filter currently doesn't have the full capabilities. I can do the same effect essentially, but it only detects tensors in the horizontal and vertical in images currently, which is kind of an interesting effect in itself, but not a good full on reproduction of the filter. I need to create a more dense tensor model and a larger kernel now which is tough to do in pixel bender, but eventually I'll crack it I have confidence now to use pixel bender accelerator at very least. The crap I've learned over the past month or two pouring through papers and books on how this filter was made is insane.

This filter was essentially made using Tensor calculus which is how Einstein computed e=mc2 so meshing that with programing is just like crazy tough.
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Chris Cox

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Please read the previous posts, which do spell out what happened.
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Philip Sustachek

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I reread every post in this topic, none of what Adobe is saying jives with my research and facts that I know. There's a bigger story here than what Adobe is telling us, or they're just being stupid and not caring about this.
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Gregory Katsoulis

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I doubt there is a conspiracy or bigger story. They didn't want to allocate resources to a feature they perceived as being used by a small percentage of users.

That doesn't make it right.
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Chris Cox

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All the facts are in this topic: The group that supported OilPaint, and the libraries behind it, went away. We cannot support that library or code ourselves (it was a huge GPU centric library), so we had to drop the filter.
Again, we are trying to bring it back in some way, but that takes a lot of time and effort.

So I'm not sure what "research and facts" you think you know -- but basically we're doing all we can with the resources we have.
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Gregory Katsoulis

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Chris, This is actually good news! I had no idea any effort was even being considered to bring it back. So, let me say, I'm all for it. How can this be encouraged, in a positive way?
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Chris Cox

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Again, that has already been mentioned in this topic a few times (including a post pinned to the top of the topic).

There isn't much that you can do - it's all work for the Photoshop developers and QE at this point.
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Philip Sustachek

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What gpu centric libraries? Cuda or opengl? Those are commonly available and can be included in the build relatively easily I would think..what part of it requires anything from adobe to do at all. It's a separate 8bf file just like any filter right, which is a self contained dll.. So how does anything you're saying make any sense?
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Philip Sustachek

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If adobe is going to abandon it and have the perception that it's old technology that no one uses, open it up as open source so those of us that are using it can recompile it and keep it updated ourselves. The fact that they're keeping it secret yet won't release it functionally shows there's something funky going on.

Which library "went away" specifically? Cause no, dont think so.

Who were the group that supported the oil paint filter? Kryptandis? How did he or them "go away"? The oil paint filter was always included in photoshop tangentially and only in the 2014 cc release actually included with the base filters of the program itself, which was great, but not the norm. Previously we had to go out of our way to install it in the program separately, so how does what you're saying many sense at all? Why was the oil paint filter prior to 2014 included in pixel bender, when it had nothing really at all to do with pixel bender, and was a separate 8bf file itself, it wasn't even using anything to do with anything pixel bender related even. It was completely separate. So wtf?

Adobe had a "group" that dealt with it? I highly doubt that.

I know software business back-handling when I hear it, my first instinct is to ask questions. There is something funky going on here I know it.
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Chris Cox

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Please read the previous posts in this topic, which go into quite a bit of detail on what happened.

The PixelBender library ran on top of OpenCL/GL/Cuda, and had it's own language abstraction to make it run regardless of OS platform. That library was abandoned, but Oil Paint depended on that library, and could not easily be refactored to not depend on that library. Yes, there was a group developing and maintaining that technology - and they went away. So we could no longer maintain the Oil Paint filter because the technology it depended on had no support, and GPUs are a constantly moving target.

Again, all of this has been covered previously, in this topic, and in the topics on PixelBender.
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Philip Sustachek

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I did reread all the posts, stop saying that. Nothing of the detail you say makes any sense.

What do you mean by it's own language abstraction?

Ok, even it's that's true, I don't think that's true at all, because it was never a pbj, or a pbk file that actually used pixel bender at all, and it existed as a separate 8bf file in cc2014, without pixel bender at all being installed, but pixel bender is back with pixel bender accelerator, so fix it then using that. Sell/give it to the company that's selling pixel bender accelerator.

The guys that wrote pixel bender accelerator as a plugin apparently figured out how to make gpu's not such a moving target, yet adobe is apparently hand tied? Don't believe it. It's lack of imagination at best, something nefarious at worst.

Again you're not telling how or why the group that was handling it "went away".
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Chris Cox

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If you had read all 3 pages of posts in this topic, you would already know the things that you keep getting wrong and wondering about.
I mean the library had it's own language, plus an interpreter/compiler for that language. That isn't something easy to maintain.

Yes, the Oil Paint filter did require PixelBender to run, even if it was not a simple single file filter. No, the Oil Paint filter doesn't work with that third party implementation - it is far from that simple.

The group that maintained PixelBender was disbanded, and most of them left Adobe.

Again, you really should read the existing posts in this topic.
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Philip Sustachek

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I know all about pixel bender. I'm programming in it to recreate at least the majority of the filter for the past couple months now. I read all the history of pixel bender, and all of Kevin Goldsmith's posts about it. The oil paint filter was completely separate, it had nothing to do with pixel bender as far as I can find. I don't see how you can say it was part of it. If that's the "language abstraction" you're talking about, I think you should go back and reread what I'm saying. It may have at one point used it as an interface or had some limited interactivity? That part I don't know for sure about. I never understood from the standpoint of how it was bundled together because I can't find any early verions of it other than a fully realized 8bf file. But that was done away with in 2014 for sure because it did exist as an 8bf file that was included in the main filter directory of photoshop on its own with no pixel bender functionality.

It also changed its functionality and visual appearance in the 2014 release from the original perhaps pixel bender related filter, so it was for sure ported over to a full on visual c++ version.

The pixel bender guys didn't write the oil paint filter for sure. Their "going away" should have had no effect on the oil paint filter, any more than any other filter in photoshop. They were already gone before the 2014 release anyway right? So who wrote the 2014 release of it?

I read the abstraction and the formulas used to create it and the explanation and nowhere did pixel bender come into any of it.

You shouldn't be saying things like that as an explanation that don't have anything to do with anything.
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Chris Cox

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Then you would know that the oil paint filter was entirely written using PixelBender. It started as a single PixelBender kernel, but grew beyond that before it was shipped with Photoshop.

Just because it was a separate plugin doesn't mean it didn't link in PixelBender (because it did).

No, Oil Paint was never ported to C++ -- it was a PixelBender filter, as you could learn reading the topics here.

Yes, an engineer on the PixelBender team wrote OilPaint - both the simple single kernel version and the more complex version that we shipped with Photoshop.

And because OilPaint relied on PixelBender libraries, compilers, etc. -- it was rather difficult to maintain once all PixelBender support went away. Again, that has been explained multiple times in the topics here.

I'm really not sure where you keep getting bogus information. You could have easily learned what happened by reading the topics about OilPaint and PixelBender here in this forum.
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Philip Sustachek

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So what's oilpaint.8bf in photoshop 2014 then? that 8bf includes pixel bender in it? How does that work? The 2014 release has pixel bender somehow in the kernel of photoshop's build? That's just nuts.

It originally didn't ship with photoshop, it shipped as a separate thing included with pixel bender toolkit, which you had to research and install separately, but the source for the oilpaint part of it was never accessible, the pbj's or pbk's were never included. I believe it was even an 8bf even then...because how would you not have an oilpaint.pbj file at least somewhere? Or any code or anything out there in pixel bender language? There's no evidence on the web or anywhere I can find of oilpaint ever existing as code in pixel bender language, meanwhile there's hundreds of other examples of people working on various filters in pixel bender, but not one trace, not even a question or source or anything of oilpaint. Why?

How does pixel bender make an 8bf file? How does an 8bf file call out pixel bender? That's just messed up. You need to compile an 8bf file in c++ as a 8bf which is a dll file..and adobe only has libraries for visual c++ to compile 8bf's, it has nothing to do with pixel bender at all.

Who was the engineer that wrote it? Let us contact him and see if he can give us the source.

That line of history just doesn't jive with what I've been researching. If that's true they should release the original kernel as a pbk so we can use that if that's really all there is to it. Why did they keep it a secret and let every other filter that was pixel bender based open source? That just doesn't make sense to me.

As far as I'm concerned you're the one with bogus information unless you can answer those questions.

Paste the pbk in the forum here and I'll be happy. Explain how pixel bender interacts with the other parts of the filter, cause I can't find any examples or documentation of any other pixel bender filter ever written or functioning like that which makes it impossible to duplicate. There's some missing abilities that no one ever knew about pixel bender apparently if that's all true.
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Chris Cox

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That is the OilPaint plugin that you copied there. It still references PixelBender DLLs.

Yes, the earliest version was a simpler PB kernel. But it evolved a bit beyond a simple kernel.

The OilPaint filter was compiled into a plugin that called multiple PB kernels, through the PB APIs. No, 8BF plugins do not have to be in C++, they just have to follow a C++ API -- some are written in Pascal, VisualBasic, even Fortran... Even the PB filter called the C++ APIs, even though it was compiling a completely different language.

Start your research by reading what we have already said. And I'm really not sure where your "research" found such bogus claims.

If you continue posting complete B.S. and accusing the hosts here of misleading you, I can only conclude that you are trolling and not seriously seeking answers.
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Petra Poschmann

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The oil paint filter was FANTASTIC
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STEVE SETLIK

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I have a dream that one day I will stop receiving email notifications for this topic. Yes, I've tried everything suggested but they still keep coming.

At this point I'd like to volunteer my time to help Adobe to reintegrate the Oil Paint filter just to clean up my inbox.
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Gregory Katsoulis

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I would vastly prefer a functionally consistent healing brush, which I use every day, to a filter that provides one very specific look. If Adobe does, indeed, need to prioritize, I think it made the right decision here. However, it isn't clear to me why Adobe would not have the resources to allocate, or why it would be eliminating departments, when it gives every appearance of being not only a stable company, but highly profitable.
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Philip Sustachek

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That's what the very superficial understanding of this filter is. It doesn't simply give one look. At a very low level it's an anisotropic diffusion filter that provides a smooth look to an image. It does it faster than any other filter of this type. I use it to get rid of a certain frequency of noise, as well as banding. It's incredibly useful if you're a pixel peeper, and for printing.
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Garner Boyd

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I keep my old PS6 also on my computer to be able to use oil paint and others the new and so call improved CC2015 couldn't handle.
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Roger Jokela

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If i had known this filter was gone I would have never bought the subscription to Creative Cloud - WTF? Sounds to me like the guy/girl that created it left the company and nobody else knows how to write the programming - huge fail on Adobe's part.....
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Tammy Hall

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I guess I will have to keep photoshop cc on my computer in order to use the oil paint. Going back and forth between programs sucks!! I appreciate that we can now download the older versions if we want too but it takes up alot from my computer trying to run more than one at a time.. there are also other toold and plug ins that will no longer work in 2015 so I will have to find the versions it will work in and redownload those as well.. I don't feel we should have to do this..I understand the reasons why they would have to take it out but I am pretty sure they have people working for them that could rewrite the code needed to keep it in photoshop. a lot of people depend on this plug in and i wish they would bring it back oe at least make a a plug in we can download for free to CC subscribers since we do pay money to have all these features.. I also wish mini bridge was brought back. I found it easier to use mini bridge rather then having to open it elsewhere. I know you can just double click and it opens in photoshop but the mini bridge make it a little faster to work..please bring back oil paint and mini bridge and fix whatever needs to be fixed to run these plug ins.. i am working with the companies i bought them from but if its not supported in these new versions then im not sure what they can do
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Xavier GAGARIN

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This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled where is Oil filter.

Bonjour,

Je n'arrive pas à retrouver le filtre peinture à l'huile , j'ai un ordinateur portable récent avec 16 mo et une carte graphique NVIDIA INTEL HD Graphics 4000.
Merci d'avance de vos remarques
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Waldir Gomes da Costa

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This is totally unacceptable! It costs me to believe that Adobe is so irresponsible and do the exclusion of a plugin and not to renew an upgrade! I got the full DC 2015 yesterday and will just cancel! This irresponsible attitude is worthy of legal action and I will.
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Catherine Johnson

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This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Is the oil paint filter ever going to be added bacy to Photoshop CC?.

I can't find anything recent on this in the forums. It appears a lot of your long time customers were very upset up this popular filter being removed. I was just introduced to the filters and can see why they are upset. So, is Adobe going to man up and add it back?
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Garner Boyd

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Adobe out of touch with their customer base just like Microsoft. To big to listen. Well I broke down and subscribed to P/S CC 2015. to check out this great new S/w. I had to leave my old 2015 on my computer so I could take advantage of all my plugins that I already had. Plus to take advantage of oil paint plugin. When I started using the new P/S CC I felt I was moving backwards. This will be the first and last year I will subscribed to P/S CC unless things start changing fast. I don't time and money for Trial Ware in my business. I do use oil paint quite a bit more than the few other feature they have added.
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Chris Cox

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You might want to read the previous replies, especially the one at the top of the topic.
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Catherine Johnson

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The comment from Adobe was 11 months ago. We need an update.
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Philip Sustachek

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So you can actually get something like oil paint filter effects using the diffuse filter setting it on anisotropic setting and running it several times chaning the orientation of the photo 90 degrees each time. It doesn't quite string out the linework quite like the oil paint filter does but I've been using it in leu of my own oil paint filter that I've reprogrammed until I can figure it out a little more.

Using it in combination with the surface blur and smart blur filters yields a pretty good effect similar to the oil paint filter most of the time.

You don't get the same brush strokes if you're looking for that but the smoothing function of the filter is basically anisotropic diffusion, so that function is really similar, it's unfortunate that the diffuse filter isn't controllable really except by running it several times and varying layer opacity.
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Philip Sustachek

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The basic oil paint filter needs to be reprogrammed cause it used pixel bender libraries which was essentially a flash utilized mainly application was phased out, and the oil paint filter used libraries from it somehow, although I'm still not sure exactly why or how. They won't release the basic code so we can use it in pixel bender accelerator either for some reason. Anyway it needs someone to reprogram it using new technologies or the sdk and other means which means a ton of work for someone that knows a ton of math, art, and programming.
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Chris Cox

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Er, no, Flash wasn't involved in any way. Please read the previous responses.
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Philip Sustachek

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Most people using pixel bender and developing with it were using it in tangent with flash/actionscript applications, is all I meant. If you look for code on the web, almost half of the stuff you come up with is people implementing it within flash. That's no longer the case, I imagine a lot of the decision to cease its development had to do with html5 replacing a lot of flash applications, and the general downturn in how flash is viewed among developers as well.
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Dave McClave

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"...it needs someone to reprogram it using new technologies or the sdk and other means which means a ton of work for someone that knows a ton of math, art, and programming...."

Um... more than a year? That's how long it's been. Adobe is acting ridiculously unresponsive on this topic.

15 years ago, before Adobe bought Macromedia, when Flash was still innovative technology, I had the opportunity to see the CEOs of both companies speak at FlashForward 2000 in New York. I realized at that time that Adobe was heading away from innovation at lightning speed toward profit; They favored appeasing stockholders, rather than customers.

It seems the trend continues, as innovative and useful features are eliminated in favor of cheap, easy profit. Way to go for the low-hanging fruit, Adobe. There was a time when you worked hard to please customers, rather than stockholders; when you put in the time and effort to do cool things, rather than focusing on recurring income. You ruined Flash many years ago, and it seems you will eventually do the same with Photoshop.
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Max Zimmermann

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Wow. strong words, not to mention killing freehand and it's workflow, which was lightyears better than illustrator
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Chris Cox

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Please read the previous responses. We already said that we're trying to bring it back. And yeah, it had to be rewritten.
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Max Zimmermann

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Sounds Good...i like & Stay curious
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Philip Sustachek

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Things change you know, Adobe is a victim of its own success I think is the problem more than anything. It's difficult to keep a dinosaur like photoshop alive vs competitors in new marketplaces. Old technologies get replaced by better things and they have to adapt vs new people that can just start fresh, it takes more man hours and work to adapt than it does to just start fresh a lot of the time. As Chris mentioned in our long argument before, photoshop filters are coded in practically every language that has ever been created, so that's a lot to wrestle and get a handle on.

The oil paint filter is no joke, it's probably among one of the most complex filters mathwise. I've been studying the formulas and trying to get up to speed on the math and programming of it, and learned a ton doing it, I'm sure they have people that are way up to speed on that kind of thing working on it, but even so it can't be an easy job. Hats off to them if they manage to actually tackle the problem well, which it looks like they're actually trying to do.

Photoshop also has a long history of innovation and compiling some of the best techniques and basically assembling new math and theories into something working and applicable, take for instance the anti shake/blur filter just recently. That's pretty amazing stuff that's thrown into the base filters now, that you don't have to go searching for, so it's always going to be hard to beat for that.
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Thanks Philip. That's about right. Thanks for your patience.
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Stay tuned. I have good news for you in the near future.
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voice of reason

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As a product manager in the healthcare software industry, I can't even imagine taking away a feature as obviously so well liked as the oil paint filter. It is unfathomable to tell customers that if they like this feature, they should turn back their software revision. Your product managers must have MBA's otherwise, they would know what they're doing.
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Chris Cox

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Please read the rest of the posts in this topic for the background about why the filter had to be removed.
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Philip Sustachek

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They didn't really have a choice, it wasn't removed, it was more like lost cause of changes in the software industry. If you read other posts you would understand that...

Honestly though Chris your response to everyone is to read previous posts even when it's inappropriate and they're just coming here to complain as a outlet though is useless...and we still get comments in email even if you delete them.
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Waldir Gomes da Costa

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The real thing is: I was introduced to Adobe software, especially Photoshop in early 90's, at the School Of Visual Arts in New York and has since stood open-mouthed every innovation. I was operating at full kit CSS6 since its release, with physical license purchased and doing automatic updates for all these years. Now, with the OSX El Capitan installed, it was recommended to upgrade to Creative Cloud, with monthly payments and very high value, and frankly, changed the look, layout tools, but, technologically, including tools and practicalities zero! In short, we are now forced to pay dearly, dearly, for the same software package that we had already bought and paid too dearly for a new, same as the old. And with the aggravating circumstance, depending on the layout change, we still have to waste our valuable time to readjust to what we used to with eyes closed. This is the reality of Adobe for consumers of its software. And this is absolutely liable to lawsuits requested to the prosecutor, based on the consumer's right to guarantees. This is the real thing!
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Steve Sprengel, Champion

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CS6 can still be installed with the CC license:
https://helpx.adobe.com/creative-clou...

I can't comment on whether it works on El Capitan, but CS6 seems to work on Windows 10, and includes the Oil Paint filter:

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Philip Sustachek

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cc 14.2 is the last version to still include it. It's what I'm still using mostly as well.
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Jack Barnhart

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The problem is, and wile that IS a good solution, I need to use both CC and the oil paint for various reasons. The issue lies with my small, college student computer that I don't have the funds to replace.

Then features from both versions are nest, it greatly inconveniences the customer to have to have two versions of the same program on one computer.
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Jorge Jaimes

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This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Loose Oil Paint filter. ... loosing projects..

My regular Photoshop CC disappear after I install Photoshop CC (2015)
I use to use the Oil Painting filter, and now is NO longer available !!!!! :(
What can I do ?, I wish I can keep the older version with Oil Paint filter as well as the new one. Is this possible in some way ?
Looks like every new version of Photoshop brings new features (most of them cool), but as well kills some other Cool Features. :(
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Official Response
This feature has been returned and modernized with the Photoshop CC 2015.1 update that was released today: https://blogs.adobe.com/photoshop/201...

More details on using the new Oil Paint filter: https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/usi...
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Peter Kennett

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WooHoo!!!!! THANK you Jeff!! :)
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Manny Gonzalez

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Sorry, not in my release :( I don't see it... and the examples shown are using CS6 ??

I see a Oil Filter in one of the menus but it is always grayed out.

And the blog entry does not mention the filter... ?!?!
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Peter Kennett

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WooHoo!!!!! THANK you Jeff, and the whole Adobe team.
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JulieannaD

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Jeffrey, That is wonderful news ! Thank you !!

I downloaded the update, and I see Oil Filter under Filters/Stylize, but it is grayed out. Have tried with multiple different photos with no luck. What am I missing ?



Thank you again ! I'm so excited :)
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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Oil Paint requires a card that supports OpenCL 1.1. Double check your card for compatibility and make sure your driver is up to date.
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JulieannaD

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Thank you for your advice. I checked and my card supports Open CL. Downloaded an update. Oil paint was still gray, restarted computer and tried again, still gray.
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Pete Green, Customer Advocate

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Try resetting photoshop's preferences: blogs.adobe.com/crawlspace/2012/07/photoshop-basic-troubleshooting-steps-to-fix-most-issues.html#Preferences -- does that help?
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Manny Gonzalez

  • 29 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
I, too, can't use it... same grayed out menu entry... I have all settings on default, latest drivers, windows 10 updates etc. etc.
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JulieannaD

  • 11 Posts
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Thank you Pete, I followed Julieanne Kost's instructions, but no luck. Still gray. https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/usi...
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Jeffrey Tranberry, Sr. Product Manager, Digital Imaging

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This is a great conversation that's separate from the main one, so I created a new conversation to continue the discussion.

Please reference the new conversation here: Photoshop CC 2015.1: Oil Filter greyed out
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Philip Sustachek

  • 8 Posts
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sweet
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Manny Gonzalez

  • 29 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
Good to see Oil Filter is back. BUT, it doesn't work :(
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Manny Gonzalez

  • 29 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
I have an HP z620 Workstation with a NVIDIA Quadro 5000 GPU and it supports OpenCL 1.1 ... filter is still gray :(