"Convert to sRGB" doesn't work on export

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  • Updated 10 months ago
I'm working in sRGB profile, but when I'm trying to export or save as JPG with "convert to sRGB" set, resulting image differs from my working file in colors. It actually looks the same as if "convert to sRGB" is NOT set. 
Here is a comparison of what I'm working with in Photoshop on the left, and what I'm getting on export on the right. The left is slightly less yellow and less contrasting:

Checking "embed color profile" partially solves the issue, but not all apps respect it, Windows 10 Viewer and FastStone Viewer for example, so I don't want to rely on it.
Here are my Color Profile settings to prove they are set to sRGB:

I'm using the latest version of  Photoshop 2017.1.1. Lightroom apparently has the same issue.
Would appreciate any suggestions on what I'm doing wrong.
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andrew.grabko

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Posted 10 months ago

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Johan Elzenga, Champion

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As you are already working in sRGB, it should not matter whether or not you check 'Convert to sRGB' on export. Conversion would be like translating English into English in this situation. What you see must have a different cause. How (in what application) are you viewing the results? Is your system calibrated? What profile are you using as monitor profile?
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andrew.grabko

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Viewers tested are standard Windows 10 image viewer, FastStone Viewer and Chrome. Chrome displays image correctly only if I embed color profile. Don't see how my monitor calibration is relevant because the whole point of working in sRGB is to have consistent look on any device. Maybe I'm misunderstanding the "convert to sRGB" option and it doesn't mean "baking" correct colors into exported image?
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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It sounds like  you're using a wide gamut monitor with a viewer that isn't color managed. Do the Export images look correct inside LR and PS? If so then you have your answer.

http://dptnt.com/2009/05/color-management-in-image-viewers/
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andrew.grabko

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Color management is relevant if an image has embedded color profile. The point of having the sRGB conversion, as I understand it, is to destructively "bake" required colors on export without color profile necessary. I'm using a simple monitor. Viewers tested are standard Windows 10 image viewer, FastStone Viewer and Chrome.  Image looks wrong in all of them
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Johan Elzenga, Champion

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As I tried to explain before: you did not really use an 'sRGB conversion', because your working space is already sRGB. Whether or not that conversion is set is irrelevant, because you are 'converting' between two identical color spaces.

No, conversion is not "to destructively "bake" required colors on export without color profile necessary". You can't 'bake in' a color profile in the pixels of an image. That is not at all how color management works.

An embedded color profile (and an application that understands it) is always needed to see the correct colors, because colors are nothing but three numbers. The color profile tells the application what those numbers refer to. Without a color profile, and/or in an application that doesn't understand it, those numbers mean nothing and so they are usually displayed wrongly.
(Edited)
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andrew.grabko

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Thanks for explanation Johan, I think I'm starting to understand now. I guess I just need to always embed profile into an image for it to look correct at least in some viewers.
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Todd Shaner, Champion

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I'm using a simple monitor. Viewers tested are standard Windows 10 image viewer, FastStone Viewer and Chrome.  Image looks wrong in all of them
There are actually two-parts to a fully color managed application. 1) Ability to read the embedded color profile (or assume sRGB in its absence) AND 2) Ability to apply the system display profile (i.e. monitor) to the image data. The second part isn't as important with a standard gamut display because its gamut is very near sRGB's gamut.

However, if you have an improper display profile assigned to your monitor OR it is wide gamut then you will see a difference between the rendering in LR/PS versus a viewer that doesn't use the display profile. Both Windows Viewer and Faststone do NOT use the display profile. Windows Photo Gallery does, but you need to have the correct display profile assigned to you monitor. Better yet calibrate your display with a monitor calibrator!

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/942856/when-you-view-an-image-in-windows-photo-gallery--the...
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andrew.grabko

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Thanks for the tips and the link, Todd, will try it:)