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3 Messages

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180 Points

Tue, Jan 21, 2014 11:21 AM

Solved

Photoshop CC 14.2: Pressing 'Esc' in text layer editing mode doesn't cancel, but applies changes.

Responses

Official Solution

Adobe Administrator

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3.5K Messages

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53K Points

7 years ago

Howdy Andrej,

This change to ESC with regard to text was done on purpose.

Honestly, it involved quit a bit of debate and wrangling on the team since from a technical perspective, it is NOT the correct behavior. From purely engineering perspective, ESC should not confirm an action -- it should cancel the action. From a usability and workflow perspective, however, this change was the right thing to do.

Many users of Illustrator and InDesign have grown accustomed to using the ESC key to confirm a text layer. As a result, these customers attempt to follow the same logic in Photoshop and wind up losing all their work without even the ability to Undo (text in PS is modal, so until confirmed, it has no history state). As you can imagine, that leads to MANY irate users...! This change is for them.

For users expecting the older behavior, yes, there is a very slight inconvenience that now they may have to manually delete a text layer (using the Layers panel). But we believe the gain for other users, both in terms of interface consistency between all three Creative Suite apps as well as in terms of non-lost work, more than compensates.

Does that make sense?

Thanks,
David

27 Messages

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758 Points

With regards to this paragraph:
------------------
For users expecting the older behavior, yes, there is a very slight inconvenience that now they may have to manually delete a text layer (using the Layers panel). But we believe the gain for other users, both in terms of interface consistency between all three Creative Suite apps as well as in terms of non-lost work, more than compensates.

Does that make sense?
------------------

You're wording it wrong. "For users expecting the RIGHT behavior [...]" is correct. Seriously. You do this in your OWN app. You have [ESC] as cancel for ALL other functions. Not just one or two; ALL. Just because you did something wrong in the past, doesn't mean you need to continue it. Also, you took away our 1 key to cancel, and now others have 3 ways to submit through keyboard input; esc, command+return or numpad-return...

FWIW, I'm a big user of your suite. I occasionally pop into Id, and use Ai all the time...

So no, it does not make sense at all. You can word it however you want, the fact of the matter is that you're breaking possibly the most common pattern in the world of UI design. That's just a fact. As in, there's no way to disprove that.

3 Messages

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180 Points

"very slight inconvenience"
It's actually not very slight. It's а significant and very annoying thing, to be honest.

Adobe Administrator

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3.5K Messages

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53K Points

Hi Andrej and Dirk,

When we made this change, we did discuss (argue!) about purity of design vs human workflows. Workflows won. Now, if you can share with me some examples of how/why this is a big deal, perhaps we can add a preference. The counter-argument, just so you know, is that Type is modal so if you want to cancel, it's just ESC and then CNTRL/CMD+Z, thus one extra keystroke, while preserving text for AI and ID users (see http://feedback.photoshop.com/photosh...).

Please understand, I'm not being argumentative, but rather looking for a case which would justify the work to make this change (in lieu of other development work and bug fixes).

Thanks,
David

27 Messages

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758 Points

David, honestly, there's only one reason why you should have it the way it is now, and that's because this is how it works in other apps. You weighed that against:
- breaking the pattern that you use everywhere in your application
- breaking a pattern that even Microsoft, Apple and Linux agree about
- not everyone uses your entire range of products
- not everyone is unable to learn that one program behaves differently to another
- you're breaking a pattern in your own application (you see the commit and cancel tickboxes in the top bar when you're typing text? They also exist when you're doing stuff like transforming, and escape cancels that.)
- I'd wager that most people using Photoshop STARTED in Photoshop before even touching Illustrator/InDesign
- As I said before: There are now 3 ways to submit text changes (shift-enter, numpad-enter or [ESC], but NONE to cancel. What gives?

We're talking about a button that was added to the keyboard for this specific reason. Aborting, escaping. And you're ignoring that.

Worse. You discussed and thought "well our other apps do this too" won over the above reasons. Just that one, single line, winning over all the rest?

On top of that, you don't even mention this change, and I'm just pissed off because I lost work because of your little "sensible change". If nothing else, revert it (or make it optional) so that others won't go through the same issue.

"Discussing a feature" is fine. But you only heard the side of the people that wanted the change. The rest of us was caught unawares and now informed that "the discussion was had".

Please, pardon any vitriol in this post. You broke something I use tons of times each day. Expect annoyance.

Adobe Administrator

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3.5K Messages

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53K Points

Hi Dirk and everyone,

AGAIN, let me say there was MUCH debate about this change internally. Picture yelling in hallways. Pouting too. It's a sensitive issue. But we decided (and I agree) that better to minorly inconvenience some users than completely dump the work of others.

That's where my request comes in -- I need user stories which can convince the powers that be that this issue is worthy of engineering resources and not simply a couple of vocal users complaining that we've made a change, one which is resolvable simply by adding CNTRL/CMD+Z after doing ESC. Keep in mind nearly EVERY change we make annoys SOMEONE...we have to balance various communities' needs and wants.

If you read the other thread, then I'm sure you heard the irritation and annoyance those users experienced when they followed their AI and ID workflows in PS and lost everything that they typed. This change does solve that. I too run into the problem you're describing myself (I've been making wedding invitations in PS, for instance), but I'm starting to get used to the extra keystroke, even as I find it annoying.

*AGAIN*, I hear your position and I get it; but that will not provide much leverage when I pitch this request without a solid, rational, dispassionate user story (preferably with workflow examples) explaining why a preference is needed.

Thanks,
David

p.s. -- users who are interested in becoming part of the discussion for future features/updates are welcome to apply to our prerelease program...! We did preflight this change there.

27 Messages

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758 Points

Turning your customer's complaints into a solid, rational, dispassionate user story with workflow examples is the job of your very own in-house user interface or user experience designers.

Don't ask the people who use your product to do your work for you.

15.1K Messages

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195.8K Points

The in house user experience designers are the ones who pressed for this change.

Champion

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882 Messages

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19.2K Points

You CAN cancel the text input with the other Photoshop-wide shortcut for cancel, CTRL+.

5 Messages

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162 Points

David, is it difficult from a software development standpoint to make this a preference option, or is there another reason why we aren't offered a choice? I understand everything can't be an option and Adobe has to make some permanent choices, but when a key is suddenly changed to (in my mind) lose its function on one tool, I think every one of your users that utilized that function would appreciate the option.

Thanks for any response to this question.

Adobe Administrator

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3.5K Messages

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53K Points

Hiya Ken,

To be honest there are three factors. First is that there is a certain amount of engineering work involved which could be applied elsewhere. We did pitch a preference, but as Folletto points out, for designers this was an overdue update to how other apps work. Second, adding a preference every time we make a change creates a LOT of overhead. Finally, there was a concern that this effort would be for naught as either people wouldn't react negatively (Ha!) or they wouldn't know / think to change a pref. Historically, any change we make gets loads of negative attention, even by people who love the change in the future... I'm not saying that is what's happening here and I am definitely interested in making the case for a preference, but without some good stories I'll be left with "some PS users don't like it" (versus what we've found to be support from suite users). My hope is to have a better use-case in order to change minds.

Does that clarify things a little better?

Thanks,
David

18 Messages

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374 Points

@David I've been hitting escape to cancel text changes because it was INTUITIVE.

This was a terrible decision on adobe's part. PLEASE make this an option or return it to the ESC key.

The switch from Photoshop CS6 to Photoshop CC has been EXTREMELY infuriating as there have been many little changes like this, without ANY sort of warning or way to restore the original settings.

14 Messages

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264 Points

After using cc for a few months now, I'm happy as a clam with esc applying my changes, as it does in the rest of the cc suite. Thank you, adobe.

4 Messages

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206 Points

After a few months, I agree with the change as it increases the consistency between products, and prevents accidental loss of input.

HOWEVER, I really hate how it leaves empty text layers - if my click misses the text area I'm trying to edit (accidentally click on the canvas with the text tool active; common occurrence when I'm using a tablet or touchpad), hitting the ESC key should abort the operation, not leave an empty text object cluttering up the canvas.

16 Messages

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362 Points

David, no it makes no sense. I can understand your thoughts, but your conclusion and decision are wrong. Your post is 9 month old. When will Adobe finally fix that idiocy? The mood and the comments in this topics says everything. You better don't want to know the mood I'm in every time I have to work with that "feature". I tend to stick with CS6 because of this. I can't believe that this is what you intended.

1 Message

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60 Points

I am an Interaction Designer and join this discussion out of general interest in the topic of ESC key behavior concerning text node editing.

In particular because I experienced contrary behavior between two conceptually similar applications, which I used in parallel: The mind mapping software FreeMind and the outliner OmniOutliner. Switching forth and back between them (on a Mac) results in constant usage errors, even after a long time of parallel usage.

FreeMind follows the conventional behavior: ESC cancels the current input and reverts the text piece to its state prior the current editing state.

Whereas in OmniGraffle ESC acts as a toggle between navigation and editing mode.

Conclusion without usabilty tests, just observing myself + design thinking:

1) From a consistency standpoint I can defend "ESC cancels last text node edit, reverts to previous state".

2) But in itself, I say that the concept is outdated meanwhile, mainly due to the almost universal availability of undo/redo capabilities! I did not read this in the reasoning of the Adobe UX designer. But I say a paradigm shift is happening here!

"ESC as edit/navigate toggle" is really a great concept. Why?

Ad 2) The widespread availability of undo/redo abilities in almost any app, mostly multi-step or even unlimited undo/redo, obsoletes the concept deciding to apply or submit after EACH single edit. To offer choice at each micro-task consumes uncessessary mental concentration. Input fault is rather the exception than the rule! Should fault happen, undo is always here to the rescue!

3) If your app has only 2 basic modes, it is very self-evident to use only one key for switching back and forth between them rather then 1 particular for entering, another 1 for submitting, another 1 for canceling.
a) Simplicity!
b) Less finger maneuvers! You can easily remain on the key, then navigate to your intended node, then repress it.
c) The ESC-key can be found blindly, even by non-savvy touch-typing users.

Ad 1) Changing such a fundamental interaction pattern (= almost a "traditional value"), really sucks in a mixed software environment (old + new concept). The transition period may be very long, and a lot of resistance will occur. But should you keep conventions which are obviously obsoleted just for consistency's sake? This is an issue, where UX and IxD considerations leave their domain, and touch change management and universal social transformation issues.

I am interested in a professional discussion, would appreciate comments! Thanks!

30 Messages

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514 Points

This is very thoughtful and cool Stefan!

I would challenge with a couple ideas: The input device needs to change before your illustration makes sense. Specifically Esc would need to be renamed.

This is challenging because of how ubiquitous qwerty keyboards are. It also neglects the elegance of num pad enter as the polar opposite (and equally easy find) counterpart to escape. one big easy to find button for yes, one for no.

Just a thought :)

27 Messages

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758 Points

Note to Stefan; due to the nature of "committing" over "escaping" text entry, it will break your undo-redo history if you go back a couple of steps, then start editing and hit escape. You'll lose your redo capabilities!

This has been an issue for me a heap of times, due to Photoshop's hugely useful history palette. Normally it would help me move back, consider a change, and then move forward again. But accidentally committing (esc) managed to make me lose some work!

So even within that new "paradigm" and undo-redo availability, it doesn't quite work.

Official Solution

Adobe Administrator

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15.1K Messages

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288K Points

5 years ago

This should be better in the Photoshop CC (2015) update. We added a pref for you to choose what you want the behavior to be. The first time you create a text layer and hit esc, you will get the following dialog:

Sr. Product Manager, Adobe Digital Imaging

27 Messages

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758 Points

Jeffrey Tranberry, you are now my hero. I will get your name (all caps) and "IS MY HERO" printed on a shirt, and wear it to every single Adobe convention I'll ever attend. Ever.

15.1K Messages

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195.8K Points

ROFL

Adobe Administrator

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15.1K Messages

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288K Points

Chris actually did more work on this than I did. I was, however, being pesky about adding a pref for it. Squeeky wheel gets the grease.

Sr. Product Manager, Adobe Digital Imaging

27 Messages

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758 Points

Not you mr Cox. Shoo.

;)

But honestly, thanks for listening. It's often small daily annoyances that push us users towards other software, regardless of how powerful your offerings are.

Adobe has been moving faster since CC, which is greatly appreciated, so kudos for that.

Looking forward to CC 2015. Great stuff.

27 Messages

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758 Points

Jeffrey - I figured as much, reading your job title.

And thanks for amplifying our squeeks ;) (give us some credit!)

15.1K Messages

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195.8K Points

Seriously, I'm still laughing at "JEFFREY TRANBERRY IS MY HERO" on a shirt...

Yes, we understand the annoyances, and that's why we take the time to add preferences/choices to make the application work well for everyone.

18 Messages

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374 Points

It only took a whole year! Seriously though, glad to hear this has finally been resolved.

1 Message

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50 Points

This isn't an option in my preferences, and I updated a few days ago, so I should have the latest. HELP?! I want to make it commit not cancel! I'm on a Mac with Yosemite.

Adobe Administrator

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3.5K Messages

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53K Points

If anyone is having trouble finding this new feature, please go to your Creative Cloud application and on the Apps tab, click Update (Photoshop) or Update All, to get the latest version.

Thanks,
David

3 Messages

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180 Points

7 years ago

Hi David,
Thanks for quick reply and explanation of this.
Well... Your explanation definitely make sense, but for me personally, as the orthodox (ancient) Photoshop user it's just a very annoying thing. The Photoshop is the major tool for me, as for UI/UX designer, which I used for 10+ years, and all these small changes for shortcut keys, which is not configurable, is a real headache.
Cause my fingers pressing these keys unconsciously, at the level of reflexes ;)
So that is a bad news...

Anyway, thank you for your answer.

Kind regards.

5 Messages

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220 Points

7 years ago

How are you supposed to cancel a change to a text layer now?

Champion

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882 Messages

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19.2K Points

7 years ago

Alfred, you can use the other historical shortcut for cancel in Photoshop, CTRL+. (CMD+. on a Mac)

3 Messages

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114 Points

7 years ago

I think Photoshop need to provide a legacy setting for the ESC function. Let the user decide how the text execution should work for them, there are a lot of users NOT using Illustrator or InDesign.

5 Messages

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220 Points

7 years ago

Thanks for the reply

It speaks against all common sense to use esc to confirm an action and there is already a well functioning way of doing it with Cmd+Return.

Would't it be more natural to change the behavior in Indesign & Illustrator? They're the ones doing it 'wrong' after all.

Champion

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882 Messages

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19.2K Points

7 years ago

The issue with InDesign is that entering text is not modal, while it is in Photoshop.
In fact, when you use ESC in ID, you escape of the text tool to the move tool, but given the fact that text entering is not modal, it stays there.

5 Messages

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220 Points

7 years ago

Ok, thanks for the clarification, I don't use Indesign or Illustrator that often.

But then it makes even less sense to copy functionality for how non modal text fields work into Photoshop where the text fields are modal.

Feels weird to break functionality for all Photoshop users to please a smaller group that work primarily in Indesign or Illustrator?

Why weren't the way Photoshop text work updated with history and turned non modal?

27 Messages

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758 Points

7 years ago

This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled
PHOTOSHOP 14.2: Hitting [ESC] commits changes when editing text..


There's an issue with the text tool since the latest version. It submits the changes to text you're editing, as opposed to exiting editing of text.

The escape button was created to stop doing something. Stop, in the sense of "No, Quit, Exit, Cancel, or Abort", according to its wiki entry here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escape_key
Instead, you turned use of [ESC] into "Yes, Okay, Confirm, Commit".

Now, I understand that in your other suite apps, it actually commits changes. This, however, is a break in the pattern used by all other computer applications, including your own. The fact that Photoshop was the only one NOT to have this faulty pattern, doesn't mean you should implement it here too for the sake of "consistency". Consistently bad doesn't beat out inconsistently good.

To give some examples, if you wanted to be consistent, perhaps you should make escape do the following as well:
Commit a transform
Submit an open dialog window
Save the layer-name you're editing

Etc.

When seen in that context, it just doesn't make sense. Besides, there's either command+return or the numpad return key to submit text.

This pattern of cancelling or escaping has been that way since forever, and is still consistent today.

Please, either make it optional or undo this change.

Adobe Administrator

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3.5K Messages

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53K Points

Please see comments, above. This change was made to help the workflow for users of our sister-products.

Thanks,
David

27 Messages

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758 Points

No it hasn't. You give that as a reason, but I'm challenging that reason in this very post. And honestly, the day "our other products do it to" trumps "you're breaking one of the most common use patterns ever", I will quit UI design altogether.

27 Messages

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758 Points

On top of that, you're contradicting yourself because [ESC] only applies/saves changes for the text tool, NOWHERE else. Nowhere.

12 Messages

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226 Points

Actually "nowhere else" isn't correct. Every other app has "Esc" with the meaning of "Close the text tool after you made the changes". While you're in text mode, you can just use things like undo to undo them.

I'm aware this is a kind of an abrupt change for users that use exclusively Photoshop, but for people that use basically any other tool this is a welcome change: Sketch, Acorn, Pixelmator, Illustrator, InDesign, OmniGraffle, ... and even more commonly used apps like Wunderlist, iCal, ... they all use "Esc" in that way. Photoshop now just works perfectly for people that use cross-product workflows.

So yes, they could have transitioned people more softly. But the change was long time due. And if the change happened, it means that most of the people use Esc in that way. :)

15.1K Messages

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195.8K Points

Actually, most other apps I surveyed used ESC to cancel text entry. Only a few and web browsers used ESC to commit text entry. Using ESC to commit text seems to be a very recent change in some app behaviors, probably due to people using text entry in browsers more often.

27 Messages

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758 Points

7 years ago

Here's a free solution:

(I know, it's not that simple. It's just an idea though.)

14 Messages

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264 Points

I was 8 months ahead of you on this: http://feedback.photoshop.com/photosh...

27 Messages

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758 Points

Good for you Ben, good for you.

You'll have to pardon my sarcasm, I get a bit frustrated every time I get a message saying there's a response to one of my posts in this topic, and there's no resolution.

18 Messages

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374 Points

I cannot agree with you more on this. Why WOULDN'T this be an option? I've been hitting escape to cancel text since cs4... David, this was a terrible decision.

3 Messages

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78 Points

It's democratic)

30 Messages

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514 Points

+1 ... escape functions as cancel in so many applications that it IS the standard no matter what Adobe's myopic internal UX people are saying.

Whats next? escape to confirm quitting the app without saving? or apply a transform? CTRL+. is a clunky unergonomic solution requiring the user to take the hand off the mouse.

It's the ESCAPE key!!! Sounds like a pretty rational inverse counterpart to the ENTER key.

You guys, Adobe.. I swear. UN-believable.

AAAAAAANND... Que standard fare defensive Adobe responses. I should update my display drivers, perhaps?

5 Messages

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162 Points

7 years ago

As a user posted above, please make this a preference option. It only makes sense to me (and apparently a good number of other users) that the escape key -ya know- escapes the changes. We now have 3 ways of confirming text (Enter key on numpad, cmd+ return, and now escape). Where is the cancel option?

I am a huge fan of quick keys and tiny tricks to work faster within Photoshop. To select a text layer, I like to hit 'T' for the text tool, then click on the layer I'm looking for, then hit ESC so I'm automatically on the layer I want without having changed the text. This is useful if I have to nudge a text layer but not edit the text. Sometimes my fingers slip and I accidentally add unwanted characters. But now, when I hit the ESC key it commits those changes and I have to undo. Of course it's just a minor extra step, but I've become so conditioned to how it used to be that it throws me off.

I understand adding features to software, but not when features are removed in order to add them. I don't develop software, but I don't understand why Adobe wouldn't give us an option instead of taking one side of a debate that nobody will agree with.

Again, please make this a preference option.

Champion

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882 Messages

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19.2K Points

7 years ago

For the time being, the only way, from the keyboard, to cancel of a text entry, is to use CMD+. (Mac) or CTRL+. (PC)

I wonder if some would not like a suite-wide prompt/ preference that would either use ESC everywhere to commit, or cancel text input, like the Bridge color settings...

12 Messages

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226 Points

I personally find faster to just use Undo. The finger are already there, and Undo is a very wired in shortcut. :)

22 Messages

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1.2K Points

7 years ago

Hey Photoshop

@David : I read your explanation, and I completely understand the reason behind to create some consistency with other tools. I just want to share some thoughts on it being a UX designer and using Photoshop myself.

Consistency is a point of view
Being consistent with the other tools with the type tool creates a huge inconsistency within Photoshop itself. The types of content in photoshop that you go into "Edit mode" to edit, and need to confirm with the checkmark, like text and free transform are expected to work similarly within the tool. Now they dont anymore. Many items now work the old way with ESC being CANCEL, but for Type tool ESC is now CONFIRM. This means that there are 2 very different behaviours with the same visual representations when editing. This creates a cognitive challenge when using the tool at high pace which super users like myself and some of the other guys in this debate do. As mentioned above alot of these shortcuts and methods are imprinted reflexes when working, and now you need another cognitive proces to differentiate between the two.

It's not something i expect can be "solved" easily or now that you have made a commitment to this solution, but it's something to be aware of.

18 Messages

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374 Points

6 years ago

@David I've been hitting escape to cancel text changes because it was INTUITIVE.

This was a terrible decision on adobe's part. PLEASE make this an option or return it to the ESC key.

The switch from Photoshop CS6 to Photoshop CC has been EXTREMELY infuriating as there have been many little changes like this, without ANY sort of warning or way to restore the original settings.